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AP World !

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Harrison Gilker

on 29 January 2013

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Transcript of AP World !

The Silk Road 1. The Building of the Silk Road The beginning of the Silk Road started with the Parthians who held an empire on the threshold of Central Asia and shared customs with the steppe nomads to the east that helped fostered trade on the Silk Road. •The Origins of the Silk Road Zhang Jian made his first exploration of Inner Asia and found many items worth trading for and acquiring, specifically Arabian horses. He is considered the originator of overland trade with western lands and personally introduced dozen of plants and trees to China; alfalfa and wine grapes. • The Spark that started the Silk Road Trade flourished in 100 BCE as the Greeks could buy Chinese silk from Parthian traders in Mesopotamian border entrepots. 2. Location Across the Afro-Eurasian landmass that connected East, South, and Western Asia with the Mesopotamian and European world. Extending over 4000 miles, the Silk Road also included North and East Africa. Begins in Chang'an and, by way of the Hexi Corridor, reaches Dunhuang, where it divides into three, the Southern Route, Central Route and Northern Route. 3. Who The trade was largely controlled and used by the Chinese, peoples of India, Persia, Eastern Europeans, and Arabia while also including trade with North Africa. Although they traded items from their respective countries, Asia and Europe did not have direct contact. 4. Trade Items Trade moved primarily east to west with Silk being the most profitable export for the Chinese. They also exported copper oxide, zinc, precious stones, and peaches and apricots. 5. The Pork Issue Does not include the Razorback's football season. Deals with the domestication of swine and how separate cultures developed different religious perspectives upon the highly ritualized and delicacy that is swine. The separate ideologies surrounding the swine spread along the Silk Road and demonstrated the different beliefs and principles that were distinct to each trade center or region. 6. Spread of Ideas Along with the many products and plants that were traded, so did several ideologies and religious ideologies. The technology of the stirrup, the mounted bowman, and chariot warfare. Religion A few of the major religions that spread along the Silk Road were Zoroastrianism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Taoism. Military tactics, such as the chariots, the saddles, and mounted bows man also spread along the newly designed roads, done primarily by the Hun dynasty. How the Silk Road promoted thought and spread inventions. The Hun established a 5000 miles of trade routes in the year 600 BCE to 300 BCE, 7. Lasting Impacts Made cultural and regional differences noticeable, established bilingualism, encouraged blended families, spread military technology, and promoted interdependence and specialized products for trade. The Chinese were primarily interested in Arabian horses and various spices while also getting alfalfa and wine grapes. Indian Ocean Maritime 1. Where In Southern China Sea, from the east coast of India to the islands of Southwest Asia, from the West Coast of India to the Persian Gulf and the East Coast of Africa. 2. History of Trade First travelers used sailing canoes and traveled the route from many of the Indonesian Islands of Southwest Asia to Madagascar. Dhows and junks were used to transport goods. Started with Mesopotamia to East Africa and India around 2000 BCE. First travelers used sailing canoes and traveled the route from many of the Indonesian Islands of Southwest Asia to Madagascar. 3. Who Major trade existed between East Africa, Western Asia, Roman Empire(until collapse), Madagascar and China through the Indian Ocean Maritime. The countries/regions that used the Indian Ocean Maritime The trade from China came primarily south while the Indians with the Africans and existed as a "cut-off" for trade, shortening routes for Chinese traders. More Info 4. Trade Items Silk and porcelain from China Spices from southeast Asia Pepper, gems, pearls, and cotton from India Incense and horses from Arabia and southwest Asia Gold, ivory, and slaves from east Africa Important Trade Items and Their Respective Countries Written around 60 A.D. by an unknown author, the periplus ascted as a written map to guide traveling vessels along the Indian Ocean Maritime. A Greco-Roman preiplus written by an unknown author that described the trade routes and navigations from Roman/Egyptian ports, such as Berenice, along the along the Red Sea and the Indian subcontinent. 5. Periplus of the Erythaean Sea 6. Lasting Impacts Encouraged blended and bilingual relations. Allowed for the exchanging of cultures, religion, and ideologies Thriving, blended port cities with growing populations The trade over the Indian Ocean established a semi-world-wide trade market that encouraged product specialization, such as that of high quality cotton from India. Trade Across the Sahara Indian Ocean Maritime Indian Ocean Maritime 1. Where In Southern China Sea, from the east coast of India to the islands of Southwest Asia, from the West Coast of India to the Persian Gulf and the East Coast of Africa. 2. History of Trade First travelers used sailing canoes and traveled the route from many of the Indonesian Islands of Southwest Asia to Madagascar. Started with Mesopotamia to East Africa and India around 2000 BCE. Dhows and junks were used as transport vessels. 3. Who Major trade existed between East Africa, Western Asia, Roman Empire(until collapse), Madagascar and China through the Indian Ocean Maritime. The countries/regions that used the Indian Ocean Maritime The trade from China came primarily south while the Indians with the Africans and existed as a "cut-off" for trade, shortening routes for Chinese traders. More Info 4. Trade Items Silk and porcelain from China Spices from southeast Asia Pepper, gems, pearls, and cotton from India Incense and horses from Arabia and southwest Asia Gold, ivory, and slaves from east Africa Important Trade Items and Their Respective Countries 5. Periplus of the Erythaean Sea A Greco-Roman preiplus written by an unknown author that described the trade routes and navigations from Roman/Egyptian ports, such as Berenice, along the along the Red Sea and the Indian subcontinent. Written around 60 A.D. by an unknown author, the periplus ascted as a written map to guide traveling vessels along the Indian Ocean Maritime. 6. Lasting Impacts The trade over the Indian Ocean established a semi-world-wide trade market that encouraged product specialization, such as that of high quality cotton from India. Allowed for the exchanging of cultures, religion, and ideologies Thriving, blended port cities with growing populations Encouraged blended and
bilingual relations. Trade Across the Sahara 1. Trade Routes 2. Who Used It 3. Trade Items 4. The Land 5. The Bantu 5. Periplus of the Erythaean Sea A Greco-Roman periplus written by an unknown author that described the trade routes and navigations from Roman/Egyptian ports, such as Berenice, along the along the Red Sea and the Indian subcontinent. Written around 60 A.D. by an unknown author, the periplus ascted as a written map to guide traveling vessels along the Indian Ocean Maritime. Travel occurred primarily east to west across the Sahara to reach sub-Sahara Africa from North and Northeastern Africa. Southern African traders that supplied salt from Southern Sahara while the sub-Saharans provided forest products such as kola nuts and edible palm oil. Towards Egypt - gold, slaves, ebony, spices, and ivory Away from Egypt - glass, oil lamps, silk, saffron, beads, and spices. The Bantu people are the groups of cultures that are the majority of Africans. More than 300 languages belong to the Bantu. Migrated during the desiccation of the Sahara Sub-Sahara Sahara Desert
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