Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Writing a Rhetorical or Textual Analysis

No description
by

Jessica Zbeida

on 17 October 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Writing a Rhetorical or Textual Analysis

II. Getting Started
First, you must
pick a text to analyze
. What kind of works interest you? Is there a text (written or visual) that you'd like to understand better?

Next, think about the
CONTEXT
of the work:
Who's the
author
? What was his/her purpose? Has he/she created other works?
Who is the
audience
? Is it a specific group? How much do they know about the subject?
What is the
larger conversation
? When did the work appear? What "challenge" did the author(s) face?
III. From Context to Text
IV. Writing Your Draft - Conclusion
The Conclusion is the last thing your audience will read.

It should provide them with a sense of closure and completeness. A strong conclusion must do two things:

Sum up the main points of your essay without

REPEATING
them
.
Answer the
"So What?"

question (indicate why your analysis of this text or image matters)

You may want to add a relevant quotation, an important fact or statistic, a rhetorical question, or other interesting statement to the beginning of your conclusion. If you've used a similar device in the introduction, be consistent in the conclusion.
GOAL!
Writing a Rhetorical or Textual Analysis
Steps to Success
(1). Summarize the Text/Image
First, you should summarize the
TEXT
or
IMAGE
. Ask yourself:

*What is this work
trying to do
? Does it make a claim? Does it try to influence someone?

*Are there
reasons/evidence
to support the claim?

*How is the work
organized
? What are its
components
? How are they presented? Why did the writer(s) chose that order or arrangement?
(2). Focus on Medium/Genre
Next, you should consider the
MEDIUM
and
GENRE
. Ask yourself:

*What is the
MEDIUM
of this work? Did it appear in a newspaper, scholarly journal, blog, etc.? What does the audience
EXPECT
of this medium?

*What is the
GENRE
? Is it an advertisement, a speech, an editorial, an essay? What does the audience
EXPECT
of this genre?
(3). Focus on the Appeals
Then, focus on the
APPEALS
the writer uses in the text or image. Ask yourself:

*ETHOS
--How does the author
present
him- or herself? Does he/she have
credentials
in this area? How does he/she
establish trust
with readers?

*LOGOS
--
How does the author use
facts, statistics, and logical reasoning
? What evidence does he/she use? Is the evidence appropriate for the audience and purpose?

*PATHOS
--Does the writer appeal to
shared values
or experiences? Does the writer want readers to have an
emotional response
?
(4). Focus on Style/Voice
Last, think about the
STYLE
of the text or image. Ask yourself:

*Is the writer(s) style
formal
,
informal
, or somewhere in between? Is the approach
satirical
? Is the
tone
sarcastic or angry?

*Does the writer use
metaphors, similes, allusions, or other
rhetorical
or
literary
devices
? Are there
visual
"tricks"
(superimposed images) at work?

*What
impression
do you think the writer wants to create with this text or image?
IV. Writing Your Draft - Body Paragraphs
The
Body paragraphs
of your essay present your analysis, which should focus on both the

TEXT

and

CONTEXT
.

When you analyze the
context
, you should consider:
the
Author
(or artist)
the
Audience
(may be primary and secondary)
the
Larger Conversation
(when, where, why of the text)

When you analyze the
text
, you should consider:
the
Thesis/Main Claim
and
Supporting Reasons
the
Medium
or
Genre
of the work
the
Types of Appeals
Used (logos, ethos, pathos)
the Author's
Style
(satirical? sarcastic? formal?)
IV. Writing Your Draft - the Introduction
When you write the

Introduction

to your rhetorical or textual analysis, you will need to:

Get your reader's attention with a
good "hook"
(a relevant quotation, fact, statistic, or rhetorical question)
Briefly summarize
the text or image (who created it, when it appeared, etc.)
Provide any

background information
your readers need to understand your argument
State your
THESIS

(what you're writing about AND why it matters)

The introduction is often the hardest part of the essay to write, so you might try writing the body paragraphs first.
I. What is Rhetorical/Textual Analysis?
What does the term
"
rhetoric
"
mean? How is it related to writing?

Aristotle defines rhetoric as
"the art of finding in any given case the available means of persuasion"
(Faigley & Selzer 58). In a rhetorical or textual analysis, you attempt to
understand how people influence one another through communication and other forms of symbolic action
.

You might write a rhetorical or textual analysis about a speech, advertisement, political cartoon, photograph, short story, poem, or song. You would analyze, or break down, the elements in the work you chose (both its
context
and
text
) to understand it better.
Full transcript