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Integumentary System

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Emily Nunya

on 19 March 2015

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Transcript of Integumentary System

Integumentary System
Hair
Hair is one of skins many accessory organs, is found all over the body, and contains numerous tightly packed dead keratinocytes.
Not many areas of skin are hairless, but the ones that are include the palms of your hands and feet, and your lips.
Hair keeps your body insulated by preserving warm air around the skin, and keeps the body protected from harmful, ultraviolet rays by covering areas of skin from the sun.
The structure of hair is broken down into three main parts; the follicle, root, and shaft.
Hair follicle- Contains epidermal cells within the dermis. The pigmentation that gives the hair its natural color is formed within the follicle.
Hair root and shaft- Have three layers; the cuticle, cortex, and medulla.
Skin
The skin has three layers; the epidermis(dead and waterproof), the dermis(hair and sweat glands), and the hypodermis(fat and large blood vessels).
The thinnest skin is found on the eyelids and is only 0.02 centimeters thick, the thickest is found on the feet being 1.4 mm deep.
Every inch of skin has an exact, exclusive purpose for the location of it.
Every minute your skin sheds over 30,000 dead cells.
When stretched out, the average skin is 2 square meters.
There are two types of skin; hairy and glabrous.
Scar tissue on the skin is lacking of hair and sweat glands.
To obtain healthy skin, try:
Vitamin A
Vitamin D
Vitamin C
Vitamin E
5 square cm of skin can obtain up to 600 sweat glands within it.
Skin can average as much as three gallons of sweat on a exceedingly hot day.
Conclusion
The integumentary system comprises hair, nails, and the glands and nerves located in the skin.
The main function of the skin system is to protect you from any harm, internal or external.
This system regulates internal body temperatures to maintain homeostasis.
The skin has three layers; the epidermis(dead and waterproof), the dermis(hair and sweat glands), and the hypodermis(fat and large blood vessels).
Every inch of skin has an exact, exclusive purpose for the location of it.
The epidermis layer is a self-regulating, self-sustaining composition while being the outermost layer of cells that make up the skin.
The dermis layer can be up to 40 times thicker than the epidermis layer. The main cells within the dermis are fibroblasts.
The innermost and thickest layer of the skin is hypodermis and it is made of adipocytes; a type of cell specialized in accumulating and storing fats.
The average person has 2.6 million sweat glands in their body.
Nerves are made of axons, long fibers that are made of nerve cells.
Hair is one of skins many accessory organs, is found all over the body, and contains numerous tightly packed dead keratinocytes.
Nail plates are surprisingly made out of dead cells and unlike nail beds and cuticles; they don't require oxygen.
skin cancer- The violent growth of irregular skin cells. Commonly caused by tanning beds or harmful ultraviolet radiation rays from the sun.
Nails
Nails and hair are both made of a protein known as keratin
Nail plates are made out of dead cells and unlike nail beds and cuticles; they don't require oxygen.
Nails grow around 1 cm every 100 days ( 0.1 mm daily) and it can take from 4 to 6 months for a fingernail to grow back completely (a toenail takes from 12 to 18 months)
If you put nails into Coke they would dissolve four days due to the drink's highly corrosive nature.
The reason for hang nails being so painful is that it is the edge of the living nail root being ripped open.
Introduction to the Skin System
Although the integumentary system is referred to as the skin system, it contains many other components, such as hair, nails, and the glands and nerves located in the skin.
It is also the largest organ system in the human body.
This system provides an effort along with every other system to maintain the internal conditions proper for a human body to function, without even just one of your body systems we would not be able to function like we do.

Facts
The main function of the skin system is to protect you from any harm, internal or external.
It will provide protection of the internal organs against disease, exposure of extreme temperatures, punctures, etc.
The nerves account for the feeling of touch, cold, heat, pain, and pressure.
Human skin of an adult would have an average surface area of 18 square feet.
It accounts for 12 to 15 percent of total body weight, weighing 6 lbs.
Skin sheds itself about once every 28 days.
Most skin is waterproof.
People who acquire rare diseases such as Naegeli syndrome and dermatopathia pigmentosa reticularis never develop fingerprints in their lifetime.
Epidermis
Dermis
Hypodermis
Sweat and Sebaceous (oil) Glands
Nerves
Clinical Disorders That Affect the Skin System
Integumentary System Song
Answer This
References
skin cancer- The violent growth of irregular skin cells. Commonly caused by tanning beds or harmful ultraviolet radiation rays from the sun.
warts- A small, fleshy, harmless growth typically found on your hands or feet, commonly caused by a virus.
dermatitis- skin inflammation.
eczema- A disease where areas of skin become irritated, swollen, and rough.
acne- the development of inflamed sebaceous glands in the skin.
vitiligo- A medical condition that causes patches of skin to loose color, usually has no obvious cause.
FUN FACT: Michael Jackson claimed his skin turned so pale because he suffered from vitiligo.
psoriasis- A disease in which skin cells build up causing itchy, dry patches upon the skin.
moles- Usually caused by a disorder by cells which give skin its pigmentation.
birthmarks- A typically permanent brown or red mark on a persons body from birth.
bullae- Fluid filled sacs that occur whenever fluid becomes trapped under a thin layer of skin.
decubitus ulcers(bed sores) - An injury to the skin caused from extended pressure on the skin.
Picture References
http://fashionsunrise.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/healthy-hair-shampoo.jpg

http://www.color-hex.com/palettes/1790.png

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/28/94/11/289411e260323bc4e1c9355dd407ed5f.jpg

http://everydayknicker.com/wp-content/uploads/sweaty-back.jpg

http://media1.popsugar-assets.com/files/2013/08/01/039/n/1922729/648397559b9926ef_thumb_temp10906271375401031/i/What-Eat-Strong-Nails.jpg

http://tw.aisj-jhb.com/viccrusades/files/2013/05/skin.jpg

http://pgbeautyscience.com/assets/images/wosc/Chapter%201/Epidermis%202.jpg

http://cdn2.hubspot.net/hub/189659/file-291640991-png/images/integumentary-epidermis-dermis-hypodermis-skin-keratinocytes-melanocytes.png?t=1425913664531


Major Functions
provides a blockade against injuries and diseases to the body from the outside world
preserves body fluids
regulates internal body temperatures to maintain homeostasis
protects against harmful ultraviolet radiation rays from the sun
removes waste
shields the body's internal tissues and organs
helps protect the body from dehydration
provides the body with the feeling of touch, pressure, pain, heat, and cold
Stores water and fat
self-regulating, self-sustaining composition
The outermost layer of cells that make up the skin
Contains three layers; the granular, spiny, and basal layer.
Squamous cells, flat and scale-like, make up the majority of
this layer.
Melanocytes produce melanin, what gives the skin color, and are found in the deepest parts of the epidermis.
Melanin also absorb and reflect ultra violet radiation, protecting the skin from the suns harmful rays of ultra violet radiation.
Over the majority of the body, the epidermis is thin, but on areas such as the hands and feet it is thick and hairless.
sweat is surprisingly odorless, but the smell produced whenever you sweat comes from bacteria within the sweat glands.
the average person has 2.6 million sweat glands in their body.
sweat glands are most concentrated on the bottom of our feet and least concentrated on our backs.
The dermis layer can be up to 40 times thicker than the epidermis layer.
The main cells within the dermis are fibroblasts.
The fibroblasts are most populated close to the epidermis, very few are found deep within the dermis layer.
Numerous blood vessels, with a small diameter, are found within the upper level of the dermis, but not close enough to break into the epidermis. These blood vessels bring plenty of nutrients into the epidermis.
The nerves(located inside the dermis layer) such as touch, temperature, and pressure occasionally do break through to the epidermis or are linked to nervous corpuscles.
innermost and thickest layer of the skin
it is made of adipocytes; a type of cell specialized in accumulating and storing fats.
the hypodermis is often referred to as the subcutaneous tissue, superficial fascia, and hypoderm.
fat in the body is stored as an energy reserve in the subcutaneous tissue.
helps to insulate the body and cushion internal organs.
blood vessels, lymph vessels, nerves and hair follicles also run through this layer of skin.
Nerves are made of axons, long fibers that are made of nerve cells.
The two types of nerve cells are neurons and glia cells.
If we lined up all the neurons in our body it would be around 600 miles long
The three classes of neurons are afferent neurons, efferent neurons, and inter neurons.
Glia cells do not carry nerve impulses.
The 5 types of glia cells are astroglia, microglia, oligodendroglia, satellite cells, and schwann cells
1. What is the main function of the skin system?

2. The system provides the body with the feeling of _____, _____, _____, _____, and _____. Name 3.

3. Which vitamins do you need to obtain healthy skin?

4. The average person has ___ million sweat glands in their body.

5. If we lined up all the neurons in our body it would be around ___ miles long.

6. The structure of hair is broken down into three main parts; the follicle, _____, and _____.

7. Nails grow around 1 cm every ___ days.

8. Define birthmarks.

9. Where is the thinnest skin found on the body?

10. Where is the thickest skin found on the body?
AAAS. (n.d.). Integumentary System. Retrieved from AAAS Science NetLinks: http://sciencenetlinks.com/student-teacher-sheets/integumentary-system/

CDC. (n.d.). Indoor Tanning Is Not Safe. Retrieved from CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/indoor_tanning.htm

Clinical Disorders of the Integumentary System. (n.d.). Retrieved from Human Physiology : http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/ap/foxhumphys/student/olc/h-reading4.html

Markey, S. (2007, February 6). 20 Things You Didn't Know About... Skin. Retrieved from Discover: http://discovermagazine.com/2007/feb/20-things-skin/

Neomam. (2012, November 26). 50 Incredible Facts About Skin. Retrieved from Eavesy: http://visual.ly/50-incredible-facts-about-skin

Taylor, T. (n.d.). Integumentary System. Retrieved from InnerBody: http://www.innerbody.com/anatomy/integumentary

The dermis. (n.d.). Retrieved from L'OREAL: http://skin-science.com/_int/_en/topic/topic_sousrub.aspx?tc=SKIN_SCIENCE_ROOT%5EAN_ORGAN_REVEALED%5ETHE_DERMIS&cur=THE_DERMIS

The hypodermis. (n.d.). Retrieved from L'OREAL: http://www.skin-science.com/_int/_en/topic/topic_sousrub.aspx?tc=SKIN_SCIENCE_ROOT%5EAN_ORGAN_REVEALED%5ETHE_HYPODERMIS&cur=THE_HYPODERMIS

What are warts? What causes warts? (2014, September 3). Retrieved from MNT: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/155039.php

Zimmermann, K. A. (2014 , October 16). Skin: Facts, Diseases & Conditions. Retrieved from live science: http://www.livescience.com/27115-skin-facts-diseases-conditions.html

The McGraw-Hill Companies. (n.d.). Chapter 5: The Integumentary System. Retrieved from Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology: http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/ap/seeleyessentials/student/olc/chap05summary.html
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