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Teaching Without Telling | Part I: Disruption

In Part I of this workshop for literacy practitioners, participants will identify and disrupt normative instructional models that serve to disengage learners in their organization.
by

Megan Pratt, OCT, M. Ed

on 24 October 2016

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Transcript of Teaching Without Telling | Part I: Disruption

C
Teaching Without Telling
ROLE CALL
SESSION
DESCRIPTION

Disrupting Normative Models of Instruction Using Creative Communication to Maximize Student Learning, Engagement and Independence
Part I: Disruption
Twitter:
@MPratt_
Email:
meganpratt@live.ca
LinkedIn:
linkedin.ca/in/MeganAPratt

Ontario Native Literacy Coalition |
Changes, Challenges, Choices, Changes Conference
| Laubach Literacy Ontario

YOUR
MISSION
LEAD BY
EXAMPLE
CHARADES
SHARING IS CARING
INSTRUCTIONAL
INVENTORY
INVENTORY AUDIT
Now, take an audit of the different practices that are
chances
for you to embed more principles of andragogy.
TEACHING AS A
TRADITION
PHILOSOPHY
AS A PRONOUN
Megan Pratt, OCT, M. Ed
WORKSHOP
HOST
Professor at Niagara College
Research Supervisor at Mohawk College
HLC Board of Directors
COMMUNITY INTRODUCTIONS
Time for a Proper
Introduction!
Name + Title + Organization
To teach is not to tell. In this two-part workshop, participants will identify and disrupt normative instructional models to master three creative communication strategies which triangulate to effortlessly enhance student learning, engagement and independence, whether one-on-one, in small groups, or in large classes.
Service
Providers
Admin
Practitioners
Volunteers
Mission Statements
+ one sentence (9.5 to 15.3 word average)
+ describes the reason an organization exists
+ guides decisions about priorities or actions
+ be clear, memorable and concise
+ provides foundation for practice
TED

|
Spreading Ideas
Smithsonian

|
The Increase and Diffusion
of Knowledge
Livestrong

|
To Inspire and Empower
People Affected by Cancer
The Humane Society

|
Celebrating Animals,
Confronting Cruelty
PERSONAL
MISSION STATEMENTS
THINK
LINK
SHARE
Personal mission statements are encapsulations of your individual work philosophies. They represent, at a high-level, the approach, values, and ideals that underpin your work. For administrators and practitioners alike, these statements define your
educational philosophy
.
In your teams, please invite
two brave volunteers
to join me at the front.
What do your depictions of the words play, question, conversation and teach reveal about our definitions of education?
GRAFFITI
teacher
student
learning
knowledge
"a co-operative venture in non-authoritarian, informal learning the chief purpose of which is to discover the meaning of experience; a quest of the mind which digs down to the roots of the preconceptions which formulate our conduct; a technique of learning for adults which makes education coterminous with life" (Eduard Lindeman, 1925)
ADRAGOGY
adult education
How is Eduard's definition of andragogy different than pedagogy?
What words inspire you from Eduard's quote?
Committed
R
Ready
A
Autonomous
V
Valuable
E
Experience
"who"
"that"
Using your outline, make an inventory of the instructional practices done within your organization (lessons, training, activities, assessments, workshops).
What
changes
has this workshop sparked within you as a literacy practitioner or administrator?
Has something in this workshop
challenged
the way you approach
literacy education?
What new
choices
do you have now as a literacy practitioner?
Have you been given the
chance
to disrupt some normative teaching practices through this workshop? What will you do with that?
Full transcript