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The Legacy of Ancient Rome

World A: 10.1
by

Kristin Palomares

on 23 September 2014

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Transcript of The Legacy of Ancient Rome

The Legacy of Ancient Rome
From Kingdom to Republic
Twelve Tables
Republican Government
Roman Law
A Written Legal Code
Legacy of Rome
All citizens had the right to equal treatment under the law
A person was considered innocent until proven guilty
The burden of proof rested with the accuser rather than the accused
Any law that seemed unreasonable or grossly unfair could be set aside
Western World Principles
Justinian
482-565
15 min
2 min
600 B.C.
509 B.C.
Series of kings ruled
Aristocrats overthrow a harsh king
Republic established
Plebeians vs. Patricians
Aristocrats
Landowners
Held most of power
Power inherited
Farmers
Artisans
Merchants
Right to vote
Barred from holding government positions
written law code
publicly displayed
All free citizens have the right to protection under the law
Laws should be fairly administered
Expansion created problems
Rome alternated between civil war and authoritarian rule
27 B.C. republic collapsed and came under the rule of an emperor
528 A.D.
ordered the compilation of all Roman laws
Consisted of four works
The
C
ode: 5,000 Roman laws
The
I
nstitutes: textbook for law students
The
N
ovellae: laws passed after 534
The
D
igest: summary of legal opinions
Established the idea of "a government of laws, not of men"
The Code
The Institutes
The Novellae
The Digest
Justinian
Roman Law
Legacies & Landmarks
Overview
The Republic
Consuls
Senate
Tribunes
Plebeians
Protect ordinary people against unfair treatment
2 members
1 year term
Commanded the army & directed the government
Patricians
Controlled foreign & financial policies
Advised the Consuls
In times of crisis, a dictator could be provided on a limited 6-month term
Senate
Tribunes
Consuls
12 Tables
Patricians
Plebeians
Republic
Identify the Roman Empire's contributions to democratic traditions.
Full transcript