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Endangered Animals

Please enjoy this presentation on a few of our Endangered Animals In the world today. This presentation has been created collaboratively, using a range of credible sources and websites.
by

Chelsea Woodward

on 10 February 2014

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Transcript of Endangered Animals

Endangered AnImals
BLUE WHALE
The AfrIcan elephant
AFRICAN ELEPHANT

the Blue whale
the ORANGUTAN
GIant PANDA
SAOLA
DIET
An African adult Elephant can eat 400 kilograms of vegetation per day.They are vegetarian and their diet consists of:
grasses, leaves
small branches & twigs
bamboo, bark & roots

They have also been known to eat bananas and sugarcane grown by local farmers.
(Wikipedia, n.d.)

WHY ARE AFRICAN ELEPHANTS ENDANGERED?
HABITAT
The largest population of African Elephants are found in southern, eastern and central Africa in:
Tropical and Subtropical forests
Woodlands
Flooded grasslands
Deserts areas.
(World Wildlife Fund, n.d.)




HOW ARE AFRICAN ELEPHANTS PROTECTED?
Routine habitual use by migrating elephants leaving barren habitats.

New land development for farmers.

Forced from their usual feeding grounds the elephants can starve as a result.

Poachers hunt the elephants for meat and ivory.
(World Wildlife Fund, n.d.)

Protecting the vulnerable wildlife of our planet is a major international priority. As you can see there are huge efforts put into sustaining habitats and maintaining populations. Through hard work and preservation we can ensure that all of these wonderful creatures are around for future generations.
DIET
60% of the Orangutan diet consists of fruit.The remaining 40% is made up of leaves, insects, soil, eggs and small animals (World Wildlife Fund, n.d.).

HABITAT
The tropical lowland forests of Southeast Asia are the home of the Orangutan.
Specifically the islands Sumatra and Borneo (World Wildlife Fund, n.d.).
WHY IS THE ORANGUTAN ENDANGERED?
Deforestation
– Rainforest is cleared at an alarming rate for the use of wood and to clear land for palm oil plantations. The land is cleared via logging or forest fires (Orangutan Facts, n.d.).

Poaching
– Babies are stolen and sold on the black market as pets, their mother’s often slaughtered in the process (Orangutan Facts, n.d.).

Roads
– The construction of roads throughout the rainforest gives people access to once inaccessible areas (Jenson, J. Nellemann, C. (Eds) 2011).

Reproduction
– Only bearing one infant every nine years, this makes them susceptible to any form of threat (Jenson, J. Nellemann, C. (Eds) 2011).

HOW ARE ORANGUTANS PROTECTED?
Areas of rainforest are under protection (World Wildlife Fund, n.d.).

Sustainable production of commodities (World Wildlife Fund, n.d.).

Rehabilitation for poached animals (World Wildlife Fund, n.d.).

Higher price for carbon credits, making conserving the rainforest more lucrative than clearing it (Jenson, J. Nellemann, C. (Eds) 2011).

REFERENCES

Elephants that are living in game reserves such as Kruger National Park in South Africa are protected by highly trained and fully equipped game wardens that watch over the reserves.

Also by educating people world wide about the African Elephant's precarious situation and ensure the ban on the ivory trade is upheld and respected.
(World Wildlife Fund, n.d.)
(Society, 2013)


Blue whales were abundant in nearly all the oceans on earth, until the 21st century.
Today the largest population is found in the Antarctic.
Smaller populations are found in North Pacific, Indian Ocean and the North Atlantic seas.
(Wikipedia, n.d.)

HABITAT
DIET
Blue whales feed almost exclusively on krill.
A blue whale can eat up to 40 million krill in a day.
They will always feed in the areas of high concentration of krill and will eat up to 3,600 kilograms per day.
(Wikipedia, n.d.)

WHY ARE BLUE WHALES ENDANGERED?
Due to their enormous size, speed and power, blue whales have virtually no natural predators. Although they can sometimes fall victim to attacks by sharks and killer whales.
Blue whales are sometimes wounded fatally by colliding with ocean vessels, as well as being trapped by fishing gear.
They are also threatened by the effects of global warming with ocean temperatures having an impact on the food supply of the whales.
(One Kind, n.d.)

HOW ARE BLUE WHALES PROTECTED?
Protection is mainly done by way of increasing awareness and education.
Whales have been protected by the international community from whaling since 1966.
Whales can also be protected by people buying food that is MSC (marine stewardship council) approved, ensuring sustainable fishing.
(Wikipedia, n.d.)


Unfortunately due to very limited records on these animals it is thought that the Soala, like other antelope species, are considered a herbivore and mostly feeding upon:
leaves of fig
trees and bushes
fruits and berries
(Holcomb, 2005)


The saloa habitat is a wet lowland in Laos and Vietnam.
There are 2 reserves for the Saola are are roughly the size of Yosmite national park and form a continuous protected landscape.
(World Wildlife Fund, n.d.)



WWF has made it one of the greatest priorities to conservation in the Inochdina region, with a small 61 square mile reserve being set up in central Vietnam due to the animals rarity,distinctiveness and uniqueness. WWF has also been able to set up another two reserves for these animals in the last 4 years adjacent to the original.
(World Wildlife Fund, n.d.)


Preyed upon by larger animals that live in their habitat, e.g. crocodiles and tigers.
Sever habit loss due to the deforestation and growing human settlements. Conservationists are concerned that the growing human settlements are the area is allowing for easier access to their habitats, which were once left untouched.
Commonly caught in traps that are set for other animals such as wild boars, sambars or munjac deer.
Hunted, their horns are a trophy amongst locals.
(World Wildlife Fund, n.d.)

THE GIant Panda
Giant Pandas live in broad leaf and coniferous Forests with a dense understory of bamboo at elevations between 5,000 & 10,000 feet.
(Giant Pandas Facts. (n.d.)).

Today, most of the wild population live in the Minshan & Qinling Mountains on the Eastern Rim of the Mountainous Qunhai-Tibet Plateau in South Western China.

Here the panda enjoys the cool, moist climate it prefers
(Habitat of Giant Panda, (2013)).



HABITAT
DIET
The biggest threat to the Giant Panda is Humans.
As the population in China grows, the Panda's habitat gets taken over by development, pushing the Pandas into smaller less livable areas.
Habitat destruction, also leads to food shortages, increasing the risk of starvation.
(World Wildlife Fund, n.d.)
(Smith P.A, n.d.)




HOW ARE GIANT PANDAS BEING PROTECTED?
The chinese government has issued a National Conservation Management plan for the giant panda and its habitat.WWF work closely with them and together they have seen a rise in Panda Population by:
Creating green corridors
Increasing Nature reserves
Patrolling against poaching and illegal logging.
Continued Research and Monitoring
We can also help by donating or adopting a Panda through the World Wildlife fund.
(World Wildlife Fund, n.d.)

ORANGUTAN
DIET
HABITAT
WHY IS THE SAOLA ENDANGERED?
HOW ARE THE SAOLAS BEING PROTECTED?
the SAOLA
The Pandas main source of food consists of the leaves, stems, and shoots of various bamboo species.
Pandas must eat 12-38kg everyday to meet their energy needs.
They occasionally hunt for small rodents and eat other grasses.
(World Wildlife Fund, (n.d.))



The following is a brief description of some endangered animals in the world today. Included is the habitat, diet, why each animal is endangered and what is currently being done to prevent these animals from becoming extinct. We have used a wide range of sites to put together this information and have chosen the site's based on the credibility of the author, making sure the organization was well known and the information was up to date. All information has been referenced APA style and collaboratively collected to provide a short but informative description of these endangered animals.

INTRODUCTION
• Blue Whale (n.d.) in Wikipedia. Retrieved on December 23, 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_whale
• Giant Pandas Facts. (n.d.). Retrieved on January 13, 2014, from, http://nationalzoo.si.edu/Animals/GiantPandas/PandaFacts/default.cfm
• Habitat of Giant Panda (2013). Retrieved on January 13, 2014, from, http://www.chinatravel.com/facts/habitat-of-giant-panda.htm.
• Holcomb, D. (2005). Pseudoryx Nghetinhensis (online). Retrieved on January 7, 2014, from, http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Pseudoryx_nghetinhensis/
• Jenson, J. Nellemann, C. Refisch, J. Riswan. Wich, S. (Eds.) 2011. Orangutans and the Economics of Sustainable Forest Management in Sumatra (online). Retrieved December 13, 2013, from http://www.grida.no/publications/organgutans-sumatra/
• One Kind (n.d.). Whale (Blue) Retrieved on January 21, 2014, from, http://www.onekind.org/be_inspired/animals_a_z/whale_blue/
• Orangutan Facts (n.d.). Retrieved December 13, 2013, from http://www.orangutan.org.au/orangutan-facts
• Smith, P.A (n.d.). Animal Fact Guide : Giant Panda. Retrieved on January 13, 2014, from, http://www.animalfactguide.com/animal-facts/giant-panda/.
• World Wildlife Fund (n.d.). African Elephant. Retrieved December 28, 2013, from http://worldwildlife.org/species/african-elephant
• Society, N. (2014). African elephants, african elephant pictures, african elephant facts - national geographic. [online] Retrieved from: http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/african-elephant/ [Accessed: 28 December 2013].
• World Wildlife Fund (n.d.). Orangutan. Retrieved December 12, 2013, from https://worldwildlife.org/species/orangutan
• World Wildlife Fund (n.d). Orangutans. Retrieved December 14, 2013, from http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/endangered_species/great_apes/orangutans/
• World Wildlife fund (n.d.). Panda Conservation Success. Retrieved on January 13, 2014, from, http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/endangered_species/giant_panda/solutions/pandasuccess/
• World Wildlife Fund (n.d.). What do Pandas eat. Retrieved on January 13, 2014, from, http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/endangered_species/giant_panda/panda/what_do_pandas_they_eat/
• World Wildlife Fund (n.d.). Saola. Retrieved January 7, 2014, from http://worldwildlife.org/species/saola

Pictures:
• Eleifert (2008). Orangutan eating a mature coconut. Wikimedia Commons. Retrieved January 20,2014, from, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Orang_Utan,_Semenggok_Forest_Reserve,_Sarawak,_Borneo,_Malaysia.JPG
• Fischer, J.P (2009). Grosser Panda. Wikimedia Commons. Retrieved on January 20, 2014, from, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Grosser_Panda.JPG
• Hobbs, L (2004). Aerial Blue Whale. Wikimedia Commons. Retrieved January 20, 2014, from, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bl-4.JPG
• Karim, M.M (2011). African Bush Elephant. Wikimedia Commons. Retrieved on January 20, 2014, from, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:African_Bush_Elephant.jpg
• Silviculture (2007). Tiếng Việt: Thể loại:Sách đỏ Việt Nam. Wikimedia Commons. Retrieved January 20, 2014, from, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pseudoryx_nghetinhensis,_b.PNG
WHY ARE THE GIANT PANDAS ENDANGERED?
created by:
Kate Rozentals
Erin Princehorn
Sophie Woodford
Chelsea Woodward
Kathy Rayner
(African Elephant)
(Blue Whale)
(Orangutan)
(Giant Panda)
(Soala)
Full transcript