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John Mercer Johnson

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Breneedan Pakeerathan

on 4 November 2014

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Transcript of John Mercer Johnson

Who was he?
- John Mercer Johnson was a British, english Canadian , who was also a politician in New Brunswick and a father of confederation.
- John M johnson was a part of the legislative assembely of New Brunswick and was a part of the liberal party.
-Member of Canadian House of Commons
- He had many occupations such as an attourney general, postmaster, etc, and he bacame a lawyer in 1850.












What?
Where?
- He was born in Liverpool England, but moved to Chatham, New Brunswick at a young age (1821) with his father, who worked as a merchant.

- John M. Johnson lived in Chatham New Brunswick all his life, working multiple jobs, such as a tax collector, fire warden, etc.

- He died in Catham New Brunswick while still in office.









John Mercer Johnson
Why?
When?
- Jhon Mercer Johnson was born on October 1, 1818, and he died on November 8, 1868.
- Before studying law, Johnson attended many grammar schools to become a great speaker.
- When he first was elected as a liberal member, he was able to be a cabinet minister under Fisher.
- He was first elected to the New Brunswick assembely in July 1850
- He had to resign in 1858, only to be re elected a year later to a speaker, and a attouney general.













During Confederation, John M Johnson spoke on behalf of New Brunswick, along with the fathers of Confederation.
- Along with Sir Leonard Tilley, Johnson attended all three conferences.
- Johnson was a postmaster general, head of all posts in New Brunswick, and then eventually became a lawyer and had a high reputation in the Canadian house of commons as a good speaker.
- John M Johnson debated amongst the other colonies, for more support towards New Brunswick.
- For Confederation, Johnson and a few other politicians fought for a central trade market in the new countries, as well as protection for all valuble minerals in the country.









- John M Johnson supported confederation because he believed that uniting the colonies can provide higher security, a central trade system, and global trade would be very useful.
- Johnson was also important because in May 1866, he led the poll for an election, votong whether or not confederation is needed in New Brunswick
John Mercer Johnson became the first ever Federal representative for Northumberland, making the area more politically stable.
- Johnson was significant because he was one of the main speakers for New Brunswick in the conferences, who debated with the other colonies.










Bibliography
"Biography – JOHNSON, JOHN MERCER – Volume IX (1861-1870) – Dictionary of Canadian Biography." Biography – JOHNSON, JOHN MERCER – Volume IX (1861-1870) – Dictionary of Canadian Biography. Web. 4 Nov. 2014. <http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/johnson_john_mercer_9E.html>.

"John Mercer Johnson." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 26 Oct. 2014. Web. 4 Nov. 2014. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Mercer_Johnson>.

"John Mercer Johnson." The Canadian Encyclopedia. Web. 4 Nov. 2014. <http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/john-mercer-johnson/>.

"Common Menu Bar Links." ARCHIVED. Web. 4 Nov. 2014. <http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/confederation/023001-4000.39-e.html>.
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