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Ginger as Used Cooking Oil Purifier

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Regina Tolentino

on 19 January 2014

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Transcript of Ginger as Used Cooking Oil Purifier

Chapter 2
Review of Related Studies and Literature
Chapter 4
Presentation, Analysis and Interpretation of Data and Results
Chapter 5
Summary, Conclusion, Recommendation
Ginger as Used Cooking Oil Purifier
Chapter 3
Methodology
In most kitchens, cooking oil goes to waste which requires households to routinely buy oil and cost them much more than recycling. Most households often say that if only they didn't need to spend for cooking oil, then they would have saved a lot for other necessities, especially in times of crisis. In response, researchers came up with an idea to purify and recycle used cooking oil for consumers to be able to reuse them.

For this project, the researchers decided to use a filtration process involving ginger.
A ginger protease has ions which are used for purification processes
group of enzymes whose catalytic function is to hydrolyze (break down) peptide bonds of proteins
Significance of the Study
Help save money by reducing cooking oil consumption

Help contribute to a clean and green environment
Statement of the Problem
1. How is the purified used cooking oil different from other retail cooking oils?

2. Will it be useful to the society today?

3. How does the quality of the purified used cooking oil compare to the commercially available cooking oils in terms of:
A. Odor
B. Color and clarity
C. Feasibility

Hypothesis
The following statements are based on the questions given by the researchers arriving with intelligent guesses for the problems:

1. The researchers firmly believe that the quality will be the same as the one present in the market.

2. The researchers believe that the product will be very useful to the society by reducing cooking oil consumption.

3. There is not much difference in the odor of the purified oil and the one available in the market. The color and clarity of the product will almost be identical to the one in the market.

Scope and Delimitations
Focuses on purifying used cooking oils which involves heating, straining, filtration, cooling, and storing

Conducted at New Capitol Estates, at one of the researchers' residence; and was evaluated by twenty (20) randomly selected students of Our Lady of Mercy School of Quezon City by using the scale of 1-5, 1 being the lowest, and 5 being the highest
Theoretical/Conceptual Framework
INPUT
 Used cooking oil

 Conical strainer

 Cheese cloth

 Paper towel

 Ginger slices

 Airtight glass
OUTPUT
Purified used cooking oil
PROCESS
 Straining

 Heating

 Cooling

 Filtration

 Storing
INPUT
Purified used cooking oil
OUTPUT
Conclusion and Recommendation
PROCESS
Comparison with Commercial Product:
• Odor
• Color/Clearness
• Feasibility
Fig. 1: Theoretical Framework Diagram
The main component of this study is ginger. Along the process, the researchers need to heat, strain, filter, cool and store in order to come up with purified used cooking oil.
The product was evaluated based on its odor, color, clarity, and feasibility versus the commercially available cooking oils.

Definition of Terms
1) Component- A constituent part

2) Filtration- The action or process of filtering a liquid

3) Purify- The action of removing contaminants

4) Absorption- The act or process of absorbing or the condition of being absorbed

5) Stimulate- The act of causing or encouraging something to happen or develop

6) Conical- Having the shape of a cone

7) Household- A house and its occupants regarded as a unit

8) Ginger- A hot, fragrant spice made from the rhizome of a plant, which may be chopped or powdered for cooking, preserved in syrup, or candied

9) Strain- The act of pouring through a porous or perforated device or material in order to separate out any solid matter

10) Secrete- The act of discharging, generating, or releasing

INTRODUCTION
Investigatory Project - Purifying Cooking Oils by Sedimentation
by Cornelio S. Santiano, Mark Anthony M. Waminal, Gian Dave C. Dimla
This investigatory project tests the feasibility of purifying used cooking oil using sedimentation. Activated carbon can also be used in the experiment to absorb some dissolved substances in the oil.

Three different setups can be used in this study, namely; Setup 1 (sedimentation done once); Setup 2 (sedimentation done twice); and Setup 3 (sedimentation done thrice).
(http://www.investigatoryprojectexample.com/science/purifying-used-cooking-oil.html)
Review of Related Literature
The antioxidant effect and the total phenolic content of the ginger extract were studied. The total phenols of the alcohol extract were found to be 870.1 mg/g dry extract. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picril hydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging reached 90.1% and exceeded that of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), the IC50 concentration for inhibition of DPPH was 0.64 μg/ml.

The antioxidant activity in a linoleic acid/water emulsion system determined by means of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) was highest at 37 °C – 73.2%, and 71.6% when the formation of conjugated dienes was inhibited. At 80 °C the antioxidant activity at the highest concentration of a ginger extract was less efficient: 65.7% for conjugated dienes formation and 68.2% for TBARS.

The ginger extract inhibited the hydroxyl radicals 79.6% at 37 °C and 74.8% at 80 °C, which showed a higher antioxidant activity than quercetin. The IC50 concentration for inhibiting OH at 37 °C was slower than that at 80 °C – 1.90 and 2.78 μg/ml, respectively. The ginger extract chelated Fe3+ in the solution.
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030881460600481X)
A. Materials/Equipment
Figure 2: Used cooking oil
- The main material to be processed
Figure 3: Conical Strainer
- Apparatus that separates particles that are mixed with the oil
Figure 4: Cheese cloth
- A sheet of fabric that further filters the oil
Figure 5: Paper towel
- Primary filter

Figure 6: Ginger slices
- Component that will purify the used cooking oil

Figure 7: Airtight jar
- Storage for the finished output

B. Procedure
1) Strain the cooking oil once using a strainer to catch and remove any coarse food particles.

2) Heat the oil to a temperature of about 170 -200 degrees Fahrenheit (76.67 - 93.33 degrees Celsius), and put in ginger slices. Turn off the heat after about two or three minutes, and let the ginger slices remain in the cooking oil while the oil cools naturally. Ginger will absorb most of the odor and taste of the foods that were cooked in the oil.

3) When the cooking oil has cooled down to about 120 degrees Fahrenheit (48.89 degrees Celsius), filter the oil.

4) To make the filter, line the conical strainer with the paper towel, making sure that there is no place where the oil can leak without passing through the towel. Next, line it with the cheese cloth in the same fashion.

5) Hold the filter above a container that is big enough to hold the amount of oil being filtered, and pour the oil.

6) Since the filter made is very fine, it may take up to 15 minutes for one liter of oil to pass through it.

7) When the filtered oil reaches room temperature, transfer it to storage jars. Close the lid tightly and store the jars in room temperature.

C. Data Gathering Procedure
The researchers asked twenty randomly selected students to test the product. The test group were asked to answer the survey form and rate the product from 1-5 according to its Odor, color/clarity and feasibility.
Rating
Number of Respondents
Percentage
1 (POOR)
2 (BELOW AVERAGE)
3 (AVERAGE)
4 (ABOVE AVERAGE)
5 (EXCELLENT)
0
0
0%
0%
Table 2: Color and clarity of the product
1
8
11
5%
40%
55%
Rating
Number of Respondents
Percentage
1 (POOR)
2 (BELOW AVERAGE)
3 (AVERAGE)
4 (ABOVE AVERAGE)
5 (EXCELLENT)
0
0
0
8
12
0%
0%
0%
40%
60%
Table 1: Odor of the product
Rating
Number of Respondents
Percentage
1 (POOR)
2 (BELOW AVERAGE)
3 (AVERAGE)
4 (ABOVE AVERAGE)
5 (EXCELLENT)
0
0
0
0%
0%
0%
4
16
20%
80%
Table 3: Feasibility of the product
In table 1 entitled “Odor of the product”, 12 respondents (60% of the test group) said that the product has a rating of Excellent and 8 respondents (40%) said that the product has a rating of above average. Based on our survey, the test group found the product to be aromatic.
Odor of the product
Poor
Below Average
Average
Above Average
Excellent
In table 2 entitled “Color and clarity of the product”, 11 respondents (55%) said the product has a rating of Excellent, 8 respondents (40%) said that the product has a rating of above average and 1 respondent (5%) said that our product has a rating of average. Based on our survey, the respondents found the product to be clear, and the color to be near the color of retail oil, supporting the possibility of ginger as a cooking oil purifier.
Poor
Below Average
Average
Above Average
Excellent
Color and clarity of the product
Poor
Below Average
Average
Above Average
Excellent
Feasibility of the product

In table 3 entitled “Feasibility of the product”, 16 respondents (80%) said that the product has a rating of Excellent, and 4 respondents (20%) said that the product has a rating of above average. Therefore, based on our survey, the product might be feasible, and give a brand new way of purifying cooking oil.
Graph 3: Feasibility of the Product
Graph 2: Color and clarity of the product
Graph 1: Odor of the product
Chapter 1
Summary
This study is focused on making ginger as a used cooking oil purifier. The purpose of the researchers is to find a way to purify used cooking oil. From the analysis of data here are the results; In terms of the odor of the product, 12 respondents (60% of the test group) said that the product has a rating of Excellent and 8 respondents (40%) said that the product has a rating of above average. In terms of clarity, 11 respondents (55%) said the product has a rating of Excellent, 8 respondents (40%) said that the product has a rating of above average and 1 respondent (5%) said that the researchers’ product has a rating of average and in terms of feasibility, 16 respondents (80%) said that the product has a rating of Excellent, and 4 respondents (20%) said that the product has a rating of above average.

Most of the respondents were satisfied with the product and some were not. However, the researchers were able to meet its goal to make a ginger as a used cooking oil purifier. There are still things that need improvement, such as its odor, clarity and feasibility.

Conclusion
Based on the results of the evaluation, the researchers have come to the conclusion that the purification is considered to be highly effective. However, there are still things to be considered, like the flavor of the ginger, because it can affect the taste of the food it is mixed with.
Recommendation
The researchers would like to recommend further study regarding the issue of preferences of consumers between commercially available cooking oil and the researchers’ purified used cooking oil. Less expensive ingredients are also recommended. The researchers also recommend this study as a reference for other enthusiasts who would like to make a similar study.
The Problem and the Background of the Study
Full transcript