Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Chapter 5 - Photosynthesis & Cellular Respiration

No description
by

Robert Mottershead

on 3 December 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Chapter 5 - Photosynthesis & Cellular Respiration

Photosynthesis & Cellular Respiration Alcoholic Fermentation-
In other organisms, the three-carbon pyruvate is broken down to ethanol through alcoholic fermentation. Metabolic processes that require oxygen are called aerobic. Metabolic processes that do not require oxygen are anaerobic. Unfavorable temperatures inactivate certain enzymes Temperature Photosynthesis increases as light intensity increases The amount of light Photosynthesis occurs in the chloroplast of plant cells and algae and in the cell membranes of certain prokaryotes. When cells break down food molecules, some of the energy in the molecules is released as heat. Much of the remaining energy is stored temporarily in molecules of ATP. All heterotrophs get their energy from food in a process called cellular respiration.
Cellular respiration releases much of the energy in food to make ATP. Photosynthesis is the process by which light energy is converted to chemical energy.
Photosynthesis and
Cellular Respiration In aerobic respiration, electrons donated by NADH and FADH2 pass through a electron transport chain located in the inner membranes of the mitochondria Electron Transport Chain Stage 2- When oxygen is present, pyruvate and NADH are used to make a large amount of ATP- Kreb’s Cycle and Electron transport chain Stage one- glucose is converted to pyruvate, producing a small amount of ATP and NADH- Glycolysis The Stages of Cellular Respiration The Formula for Cellular Respiration Rate increases with increase of carbon dioxide. Concentration of carbon dioxide Light
Carbon dioxide
temperature Factors that Affect Photosynthesis In the third stage of photosynthesis carbon atoms are used to make organic compounds.

C5 + CO2 + ATP + NADPH ---> C6H12O6 Stage Three- Storage of Energy Excited electrons that leave chlorophyll molecules are used to produce new molecules, including ATP, that temporarily store chemical energy. Stage 2: Conversion of Light Energy The pigments that produce yellow and orange fall leaf colors, as well as the colors of many fruits, vegetables, and flowers, are called carotenoids.

Cells use the energy released by this reaction to power metabolism. In cells, chemical energy stored in food molecules is released gradually in a series of enzyme assisted chemical reactions. Metabolism involves either using energy to build molecules or breaking down molecules in which energy is stored. Building Molecules That Store Energy Lactic Acid Fermentation- during vigorous exercise pyruvate in muscles is converted to lactate when muscle cells must operate without enough oxygen. Respiration in the Absence of Oxygen Like in most organisms, your cells transfer the energy in organic compounds, especially glucose into ATP. Section 3 – Cellular Respiration The plant leaves contain structures called pigments that absorb certain wavelengths of light and reflect others. Stage One: The Absorption of Light When energy is released from ATP it can be used to power other chemical reactions, such as those that build molecules. Organisms that use energy from sunlight or from chemical bonds in inorganic substances to make organic compounds are called autotrophs. Directly or indirectly, almost all the energy in living systems needed for metabolism comes from the sun.
Energy and Living Things Plants, algae, and some bacteria capture about 1 percent of the energy in the sunlight that reaches Earth and converts it to chemical energy through the process of photosynthesis. Section 2- Photosynthesis Organisms that must get energy from food instead of directly from sunlight or inorganic substances are called heterotrophs.
Photosynthesis and
Cellular Respiration Directly or indirectly, almost all the energy in living systems needed for metabolism comes from the sun.
Energy and Living Things Metabolism involves either using energy to build molecules or breaking down molecules in which energy is stored. Building Molecules That Store Energy Photosynthesis is the process by which light energy is converted to chemical energy. Organisms that use energy from sunlight or from chemical bonds in inorganic substances to make organic compounds are called autotrophs. Organisms that must get energy from food instead of directly from sunlight or inorganic substances are called heterotrophs. All heterotrophs get their energy from food in a process called cellular respiration.
Cellular respiration releases much of the energy in food to make ATP. In cells, chemical energy stored in food molecules is released gradually in a series of enzyme assisted chemical reactions. When cells break down food molecules, some of the energy in the molecules is released as heat. Much of the remaining energy is stored temporarily in molecules of ATP. When energy is released from ATP it can be used to power other chemical reactions, such as those that build molecules.

Cells use the energy released by this reaction to power metabolism. Plants, algae, and some bacteria capture about 1 percent of the energy in the sunlight that reaches Earth and converts it to chemical energy through the process of photosynthesis. Section 2- Photosynthesis Photosynthesis occurs in the chloroplast of plant cells and algae and in the cell membranes of certain prokaryotes. The plant leaves contain structures called pigments that absorb certain wavelengths of light and reflect others. Stage One: The Absorption of Light The pigments that produce yellow and orange fall leaf colors, as well as the colors of many fruits, vegetables, and flowers, are called carotenoids. Excited electrons that leave chlorophyll molecules are used to produce new molecules, including ATP, that temporarily store chemical energy. Stage 2: Conversion of Light Energy In the third stage of photosynthesis carbon atoms are used to make organic compounds.

C5 + CO2 + ATP + NADPH ---> C6H12O6 Stage Three- Storage of Energy Light
Carbon dioxide
temperature Factors that Affect Photosynthesis Photosynthesis increases as light intensity increases The amount of light Unfavorable temperatures inactivate certain enzymes Temperature Like in most organisms, your cells transfer the energy in organic compounds, especially glucose into ATP. Section 3 – Cellular Respiration Metabolic processes that require oxygen are called aerobic. Metabolic processes that do not require oxygen are anaerobic. The Formula for Cellular Respiration Stage one- glucose is converted to pyruvate, producing a small amount of ATP and NADH- Glycolysis The Stages of Cellular Respiration Stage 2- When oxygen is present, pyruvate and NADH are used to make a large amount of ATP- Kreb’s Cycle and Electron transport chain In aerobic respiration, electrons donated by NADH and FADH2 pass through a electron transport chain located in the inner membranes of the mitochondria Electron Transport Chain Lactic Acid Fermentation- during vigorous exercise pyruvate in muscles is converted to lactate when muscle cells must operate without enough oxygen. Respiration in the Absence of Oxygen Alcoholic Fermentation-
In other organisms, the three-carbon pyruvate is broken down to ethanol through alcoholic fermentation.
Full transcript