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Inventions of the Italian Renaissance

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by

Sarah Smith

on 4 January 2013

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Transcript of Inventions of the Italian Renaissance

Inventions of the Italian
Renaissance The Mechanical Clock . "RENAISSANCE INVENTIONS." . The Borgias. Web. 14 Dec 2012. <http://theborgias.wetpaint.com/page/Renaissance INVENTIONS>. Works Cited Spectacles The Printing Press The Printing press was a big advancement in writing and literature. It was invented in 1436
by Johann Gutenburg. "Gutenberg used his printing press to put ink on hundreds of individual letters that could be combined in numerous ways to create a entire page of text." The Telescope The telescope was invented in 1608 by Hans Lippershy. The telescope to enlarge images too
small for the eye to see. It had to combined lenses
to enlarge the image someone is trying to study. The Clock was invented in the thirteenth
Century. The earliest version contained mercury
in the drum of the clock. The mercury contro-
lled the movement and speed of the clock.
The clock ran on a 24 hour cycle. Spectacles were convex and concave lenses
used as vision correctors. They were made
in 1280 in Florence, Italy. "These spectacles can be seen in paintings of Pope Leo X, who was often depicted wearing concave lenses to correct his vision problem of myopia, or near-sightedness."
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