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Copy of Point, Evidence, Explanation.

Introduction to PEE
by

Michaela Fay

on 2 February 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Point, Evidence, Explanation.

Answering questions on text Point Evidence Explain P.E.E P.E.E So what is it? Think off P.E.E as a burger What does P.E.E do? L.O. To be able to use PEE to structure a response If you leave either the top, filling or base out, it is not a proper burger!
The same is true when you answer a literature question. If you leave either the Point, Evidence or Explanation out, it is not a proper answer! We use PEE to answer comprehension questions about literature (novels)

Questions such as: How is language used to create tension in Harry Potter?

In the future...
You will use it to write literature essays Point – A statement that you want to make Evidence – A quote from the text Explanation – Explain what the quote means and how it helps to demonstrate your point Onomatopoeia is particularly good at building tension in writing as it makes the description more vivid and real, therefore making the reader imagine these sounds.

Language is often used to create tension. In Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone there are many examples of this.

For example, onomatopoeia such as “boom” and “SMASH” are used in chapter four to build tension. Language is often used to create tension. In Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone there are many examples of this. For example, onomatopoeia such as “boom” and “SMASH” are used in chapter four to build tension. Onomatopoeia is particularly good at building tension in writing as it makes the description more vivid and real, therefore making the reader imagine these sounds. P.E.E Point;
It is clear that...
The character ...

Evidence;
For example “…”
This is shown when the character says "..."

Explanation;
This is used because …
From this we can see... Which part of PEE do you find the most difficult? Note this down as something that you need to work on. Finding P.E.E You need to know P.E.E!
This is a way of answering a question that allows you to show off your knowledge, skills and understanding.
How does the author show that the girl is frightened of being in the house on her own?

As the writer does this in a number of ways, if you finish early chose a few and create a PEE response for each.

Remember if you are quoting use "speech marks"
Use your P.E.E decider to help you start your sentences! When Skellig talks to Michael, Michael thinks that Skellig smells awful. This is clear when Michael narrates, “I tried not to breathe, not to smell him.” When someone smells bad, one does not want to get too close or to breathe in the smell, so although Michael wants to help Skellig, he does not want to get too close, so that he does not have to breathe in his smell. When Skellig talks to Michael, what does Michael find unpleasant? Point Evidence Explain Example: How is language used to create tension in Harry Potter? So what did we learn about Point Evidence Explanation? P.E.E stands for:
Point
Evidence
Explanation Must: Should: Could: Understand the use of P.E.E Recognise P.E.E in an example answer. Write your own answer to a question using P.E.E We can use sentence starters such as these... Using starters like this will get you up to AF2 level 6 in reading. Your turn:
Read “Boo” and answer the following question, making sure that you use PEE to structure your answer.
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