Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Headline Writing: The Art-Head Approach

A foolproof formula to write headlines with artistic elements for print publications.
by

Meagan Choi

on 30 August 2011

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Headline Writing: The Art-Head Approach

Write an art head, which can dominate the cover of a magazine or the front of a feature section. They typically range from one word to a short phrase.
These are not like normal news-page headlines.
Play them LARGE and with striking typography so the words become a dominant art element.
2. By isolating the angles and then pairing them up, you should get some good, creative headline ideas. Often, generic headlines have nothing more clever going for them than alliteration.
4. When you have a dozen words or so in each column, the fun begins. Start pairing up words, one from each column, in whatever order seems to make sense.
1. Read or ask about the feature story to determine two primary angles. There might be three, but stick with two for now.
3. Take those two elements and brainstorm a list of words for each.
As sales from print media decline and online news grows, the newspaper headline has become vital to catching readers' attention, as shown in these publications.
HEADLINE
WRITING
But here is one strategy that almost always works.
Alliteration can help.
Plays on clichés or expressions can be good.
A great quote can sometimes become the headline.
Direct address can work.
On rare occasions, a question headline works.
Here's how.
And this process can help you do it.
Credits to Brian Throckmorton of the Lexington Herald-Leader
Skim through columnist Mark Peters' article for GOOD magazine where he discusses the shift in culture as geeks become "chic."

http://www.good.is/post/do-you-geek-geeks-how-geek-became-chic/
We'll pick out "geeks" and "in style" for this example.
Geek
Nerd
Dork
Dweeb
Techie
Brain
Oddball
Bookworm
Misfit
Weirdo
Loser

In style
Chic
Vogue
Trendy
Fashionable
Popular
Up-to-date
Cool
Hip
Groovy
Cool

"Geeky chic"
"Trendy techie"
"Misfit hip"

I bet you could come up with far better ones!
5. You might not even wind up with both angles in your final headline. The point here is to have a process that stirs your imagination and creativity.
Compiled by Meagan Choi
Images were taken from npd.snd.org.
Full transcript