Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Tragic, comic? Super-hero, good-for-nothing?

typologies of stories, centred on the hero: is he successful? if yes, comic, if no, tragic. How powerful is he compared to the other humans? Is he above us, like us, or below us?
by

Simona Petrescu

on 3 January 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Tragic, comic? Super-hero, good-for-nothing?

Heroic?



Tragic Comic?



Or ironic?

nature of the hero
degree of hero's
qualities
superior in nature:
to others
to world
superior in
degree:
to others
to world
superior in
degree:
to others
not superior
in any way

inferior to us
Tragic:
hero rejected
God's death
Hercules, Christ
nature weeps
myth
hero, demigod's death
romance
Roland, Arthur
meditative sadness
the fall of the tragic hero
tragedy
Oedipus, Othello
pity and fear:
catharsis
hubris, hamartia
Sacrifice of the victim,
failure of villain
melodrama
Tess, Heathcliff
pity and fear turned into sensation:
pathos
the scapegoat
tragic irony
Job, persecuted Negroes or Jews
guilt: living in a guilty society
no feeling, no judgment
Comic:
hero integrated
dinner with gods
myth
probation, salvation
Hercules, Divina Commedia
serenity
idyllic harmony
romantic (romance) comedy
pastoral, the frontier, the West
Western stories
bliss
heroic triumph
classical heroic comedy
Aristophanes' comedies,
Shakespeare's Tempest or Midsummer Night's Dream
catharsis of admiration and tolerance
he meets her
domestic comedy
erotic intrigue, "discovery", social promotion
Shakespeare's comedies
amusement and laughter
shoot that rascal
detective story
relief
Tartuffe, Sherlock Holmes
comic irony meets tragic irony
Northrop Frye: Fictional modes, in Anatomy of Criticism
that's why we need structure
HEROIC
IRONIC
Full transcript