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Ch. 19 Geography Matters...

AP Lit Ch. 19 HTRLLAP
by

Sirena Turner

on 17 September 2012

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Transcript of Ch. 19 Geography Matters...

Ch. 19
Geography Matters... Writers have to decide every time, where is this taking place?

Some writers often set their characters in the same place.
Example: For example, William Faulkner set several of his books including As I Lay Dying, The Sound and the Fury, and Absalom, Absalom! in his "fictional 'postage stamp of ground'": Yoknapatawpha County, Mississippi (p. 164). What does Geography mean in Literature? In some cases, Geography means everything. For example... The Caribbean is really the only place The Old Man and the Sea could have taken place. Setting includes essential components to the story: history, interaction between American and Cuban culture, corruption, poverty, fishing, and baseball. Geography is key to the setting of the story.
hills
rivers
deserts
beaches
latitude
mountains
valleys
buttes
steppes
glaciers
swamps
islands
chasms
prairies Geography: hills Rivers Valleys Deserts Mountains Islands But... Geography can also be: economics
politics
history
people* Foster uses the example that Napoleon could not defeat the Russians and their ferocious winter weather. The merciless elements shape the tough, unyielding people who live there Literary geography is about humans inhabiting spaces

* and *

spaces that inhabit humans. Geography can be setting OR it can be psychology, attitude, finance, industry. A lot of times WHO people are is about WHERE they are from or WHERE they represent. Geography Can be Theme or Plot One excellent example is The Fall of the House of Usher. The description of the landscape, place, or geography of the story makes it super creepy before anything even happens. Geography and Character Geography can be a character For example, in Tim O'brien's Going After Cacciato, he makes the geography of Vietnam come to life as an actual character. The soldier's rage is actually directed at the PLACE that resembles all of their misery, shown by the action of blowing up a village of civilians for seemingly no reason. It's because the village is actually the target. Or...Geography can develop a character Not always, but often, characters start somewhere as someone and as they move location, they change. Foster says: "When a writer sends a character south, it's so they can run amok." P. 171 Foster gives many example for this, but one I thought of was in Rabbit Run, by John Updike. In this novel, when Rabbit abandons his family, he drives South. In his time away, Rabbit encounters many difficulties including sexuality, spirituality, finances, and emotional health. One could accurately say he "ran amok."

Foster says this running amok is due to having a direct, raw encounter with the subconscious. This is also clear in Rabbit's case. Geography
Hills & Valleys LOW means:
swamps
crowds
fog
darkness
fields
heat
unpleasantness
people
life
death HIGH means:
snow
ice
purity
thin air
clear views
isolation
life
death Writers will make both locations work for them.

But you should notice that there is danger in both.
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