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PH 223 21:1-3

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by

Richard Datwyler

on 19 September 2016

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Transcript of PH 223 21:1-3

Superposition
standing waves on a string

Nodes happen when the amplitude = 0
thus D(x,t) = 0
Both time and position are sinusoidal there will be 0 answers for both
For a standing wave on a string with fixed ends our solution is limited to having nodes at the end points
thus D= 0 there. Two cases x = 0 and x = L
a. what are the fundamental frequency and the wave speed?
Standing waves on a 1.0-m long string that is fixed at both ends are seen at successive frequencies of 36 Hz and 48 Hz.
b. Draw the standing-wave pattern when the string oscillates at 48 Hz.
A heavy piece of hanging sculpture is suspended by a 90-cm-long, 5.0 g steel wire. When the wind blows hard, the wire hums at it fundamental frequency of 80 Hz. What is the mass of the sculpture.
"So you can see your reflection dimly on a window because most of the light goes through it and only a little bounces back. So how is a mirror different from a window? Is there something inside it that prevents light from going through it so it all bounces back I would assume?"
"Can you explain harmonics more in depth? How are the standing wave equations derived? Meaning where did they come from? Conceptually I'm having a hard time picturing standing waves and the principle of superposition."
"I don't understand how to do example 21.2"
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