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Digital Parenting 2018

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Andrew Williams

on 12 September 2018

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Transcript of Digital Parenting 2018

Digital Parenting
Andrew Williams
Online Safety Consultant
SWGfL
@wenglishgeek
www.swgfl.org.uk
www.saferinternet.org.uk

What do you do with technology?
What do our kids do online?
Underlying all of this is: BEHAVIOUR
Gaming - an issue for boys?
Parents need to know that Grand Theft Auto V is an M-rated action game brimming with gang violence, nudity, extremely coarse language, and drug and alcohol abuse. It isn't a game for kids. Playing as hardened criminals, players kill not only fellow gangsters but also police officers and innocent civilians using both weapons and vehicles while conducting premeditated crimes, including a particularly disturbing scene involving torture. Women are frequently depicted as sexual objects, with a strip club mini-game allowing players to fondle strippers' bodies, which are nude from the waist up. Players also have the opportunity to make their avatars use marijuana and drink alcohol, both of which impact their perception of the world. None of the main characters in the game makes for a decent role model. All of them are criminals who think of themselves first and others rarely at all. Few games are more clearly targeted to an adult audience.
Screentime - or Context, Content, Connections?
What is the activity?
What is the content?
Why are the connections important?
Is there balance?
Images and Snapchat
Table developed by the EUKids Online project and referenced in paragraph 1.3 of the Byron Review.
Bias

Pornographic or unwelcome sexual content

Violent / hateful content

Adverts
Spam
Sponsorship
Personal info

What risks should we be guarding against?
Self harm
Unwelcome persuasions

Meeting strangers
Being groomed

Being bullied, harassed or stalked

Tracking
Harvesting personal info
Providing misleading info or advice

Creating and uploading inappropriate material
Bullying or harassing another
Illegal downloading
Hacking
Gambling
Financial scams
Terrorism
Content (child as recipient)
Commercial

Aggressive

Sexual

Values

Contact (child as participant)
Commercial

Aggressive

Sexual

Values

Conduct (child as actor)
Commercial

Aggressive

Sexual

Values

Racism
Misleading info or advice


RISK
HARM
Sharing Images
What
How
Risks
Consequences
Support - What can we do?
The singularly most important thing:
Dialogue
Be interested in what they are doing.
Make sure they are comfortable in coming to you if there is an issue.
Try really hard not to take away devices or internet access
Support- what can we do?
The most useful sources of support and information:
Other Practical Steps
Set time limits.
Use family safety settings wherever you can
Discuss game age limits and why they are set
Support your children in understanding:
there is no such thing as private
Discuss: Scalability, Durability and Audience
Technology is a privilege not a right!
Monitor apps - set up family sharing/family plan
Random dip sample
Most importantly
if you suspect an adult is targeting a child
Challenges to parents
Consider:
What behaviours do you model as a digital role-model for your children?
www.swgfl.org.uk/evaluation
Landscape changes
Social Media
Privacy
Connected
Sociality
Access
Criticality
Role Model
wide
complex
constant
transparent
mobile
design
more active
limited
manageable
finite
selective
fixed
content
passive
http://www.vodafone.com/content/digital-parenting/learning-and-fun/digital-parenting-magazine.html
of parents do share photos of their children, and half of these share photos at least once a month
%
'sharenting'
Your (and their) Digital Footprint is now more important than ever
Most at risk?
Online victims
Have poor peer relationships
Have both emotional and behavioural difficulties
Spend more time online unsupervised
Bully others face to face
Online bullies
Are impulsive
Hold pro aggressive or pro bullying attitudes
Have low levels or empathy (both affective and cognitive)
Poor moral responsibility (disengagement)
Seek popularity among peers through aggression
Are bullied face to face
M. O'Moore(2014) Understanding cyberbullying:A guide for parents and Teachers, Veritas Publishing
Coping strategies
Social coping:
seeking help from friends, family, teachers, peer supporters

Aggressive coping:
retaliation, physical attacks, verbal threats

Helpless coping:
hopelessness, passive reactions, such as avoidance, displays of emotion

Cognitive coping:
responding assertively, using reason, analysing the bullying episode and bully's behaviour

Technical coping:
switching off the computer, changing email address or nickname and only giving them to people that can be trusted and showing messages to a grown up

Riebel et al. (2009);Hoff & Mitchell (2008)
What can you do
Online Bullying
Listen without judging your child
Stay calm
Keep evidence of the abusive content
Work in partnership with school
Avoid commenting on or sharing any bullying posts or messages
Block and report the user to the social network
This presentation:
https://goo.gl/vnD64i

commonsensemedia.org
http://www.askaboutgames.com/
Full transcript