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Copy of Develop professional supervision practice in health and soci

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Eudene Sukwah

on 18 May 2014

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Transcript of Copy of Develop professional supervision practice in health and soci

Develop professional supervision practice in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings
1 Understand the purpose of professional supervision in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings
3
Be able to undertake the preparation for professional supervision with supervisees in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings

2
Understand how the principles of professional supervision can be used to inform performance management in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings

Aims of the session
About the Unit
On Hand Out 1 is an overview of the aims and objectives of this unit.

There are six learning outcomes for this unit.
1 Understand the purpose of professional supervision in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings - this will be done with written activities and account
2. Understand how the principles of professional supervision can be used to inform performance management in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings - this will be done with written activities and account
3.Be able to undertake the preparation for professional supervision with supervisees in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings - this will be done through account, activities, gaining WT and where appropriate Direct Observation
About the Unit
On Hand Out 1 is an overview of the aims and objectives of this unit.

There are six learning outcomes for this unit.
4. Be able to provide professional supervision in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings - this will be through activities, WT and where appropriate Direct Observation
5. Be able to manage conflict situations during professional supervision in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings - this will be through activities, WT and account
6. Be able to evaluate own practice when conducting professional supervision in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings - this will be through activities, WT and where appropriate Direct Observation
1 Understand the purpose of professional supervision in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings
2 Understand how the principles of professional supervision can be used to inform performance management in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings
3 Be able to undertake the preparation for professional supervision with supervisees in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings
You need to open a blank assessment plan, put today's date and state the above will be covered through, group discussion, written activity and the production of an account
1.1
Analyse the principles, scope and purpose of professional supervision
Open Hand Out 2 and complete as we discuss
What are the principles of professional supervision?
Supervision is an opportunity for a worker and a line manager to discuss what they expect from each other and to evaluate how well these expectations are being met in practice. Each party is given the chance to reflect in a safe atmosphere that is non-adversarial and serves a common purpose. Positive achievements are recognised and praised, and areas of development identified. Continuous personal and professional development activities are planned for
the next 6–12 months and future goals mutually set. The outcomes of development from the last appraisal meeting are checked and evaluated.

1.1
Analyse the principles, scope and purpose of professional supervision
What is the purpose of professional supervision?
The focus of your supervision should be on improving practice and achieving high standards of service delivery.
• ensures the worker is clear about their role and responsibilities
• ensures the worker is focused on meeting the organisation’s objectives
• ensures the worker delivers a quality service
• develops and sustains a climate in which best practice is achieved
• supports continuous professional development
• reduces worker stress
• ensures the worker is given the resources to do the job.

1.1
Analyse the principles, scope and purpose of professional supervision
Scope is about how professional supervision can be achieved.
What methods can you adopt that involves professional supervision?
Team Meetings

Appraisals and 1 2 1's

Mentoring

Induction

Handovers
Key Points:
Effective supervision:
clarifies the role of the worker
ensures the worker communicates with and listens to colleagues and other professionals
focuses the worker on expected standards of practice
enables workers to reflect on their own practice in an open, honest way.
acknowledges achievements and strengths while promoting on-going development of knowledge and skills
is based on a negotiated agreement that clarifies the purpose, process and expectations of both parties
protects service users, the supervisee and the supervisor through a focus on standards of practice.
Work through Hand Out 3
1.2

Outline theories and models of professional supervision

You will need to research this and complete as part of your written account.
1.3
Explain how the requirements of legislation, codes of practice and agreed ways of working influence professional supervision
What legislation, codes of practice and agreed ways of working can you think of that would relate to professional supervision?
From 1 October 2010, the Health and Social Care Act 2008 made every health and adult social care service in England legally responsible for making sure it meets new essential standards of quality and safety.
Supervision requirements of the Health and Social Care Act 2008,
Regulation 23 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated
Activities) Regulations 2010

Where the regulated activity carried on involves the provision of health care, the registered person must (as part of a system of clinical governance and audit) ensure that healthcare professionals employed for the purposes of carrying on the regulated activity are enabled to provide evidence to their relevant professional body demonstrating, where it is possible to do so, that they continue to meet the professional standards which are a condition of their ability to practice.

The General Social Care Council produces a Code of Conduct that defines the expected behaviour of all care workers.

Walsall Council also produces a clear Code of Practice that defines how it expects it's employees to act and behave when at work.

Walsall Council has a clear supervision policy and procedure that defines why professional supervision is needed, frequency and how to undertake

Legal emphasis through the Health and Social Care Act means that:
• ensure that staff are properly supported to provide care and treatment to people who use services
• ensure that staff are properly trained, supervised and appraised
• enable staff to acquire further skills and qualifications that are relevant to the work they undertake.
1.4
Explain how findings from research, critical reviews and inquiries can be used within professional supervision
This will need to be covered within your account
1.5
Explain how professional supervision can protect the:
• Individual
• Supervisor
• Supervisee
Since the focus of The Care Standards Act 2000 was public protection, it is safe to surmise that one way to more effectively protect people is by having close supervision of staff.
Good supervision ensures that the service is managed effectively. However, in health and social care it also has a deeper significance.

Strong supervision leads to an open environment with clear channels of communication between staff and management.

An important aspect of safeguarding is that staff are able to discuss issues of concern or those which may impact upon their work.

How do you feel that professional supervision protects:
The Individual (using the service)
The Supervisee
The Supervisor
Use hand out 5
2.1 Explain the performance management cycle
2.1 Explain the performance management cycle
Performance management is often seen as an aspect of supervision in the sense that supervision is the process through which care workers are able to assess their own personal effectiveness, and line managers are closely involved in the assessment of individual’s performance and evaluation of their practice.
There are a number of different models but all have the same principles, these will need to be covered within your account
2.2 Analyse how professional supervision supports performance
Think about your own supervisions and those you hold with your staff, how do you think that these assist in promoting performance?
• ‘empowered’ staff – because tasks and workload are monitored and adjusted accordingly; line managers have the confidence to delegate and as a result staff find the job more rewarding

• ‘less stressed’ staff – because difficulties are recognised at an early stage and staff are supported through work problems and personal issues that may affect performance

• higher retention – as staff feel valued, have more confidence in their own capabilities and therefore greater self-esteem

• improved interaction between workers and management – because communication channels are open

• more effective use and understanding of organisational policies and procedures

• better teamwork and a problem-solving ethos, particularly where group supervision sessions are used.

Complete Hand Out 6 which discusses these
2.3 Analyse how performance indicators can be used to measure practice
A performance indicator or key performance indicator (KPI) is a type of performance measurement. An organisation may use KPIs to evaluate its success, or to evaluate the success of a particular activity in which it is engaged or the performance of individuals.
What PI's can you think of that you use within your working role measures practice?
Sickness Levels?
Retention of staff?
Customer feedback levels or scoring?
New referrals or uptake of the services offered?
People needing less support 6 weeks after the service commenced?
Low numbers of safeguarding investigations?
3.1
Explain factors which result in a power imbalance in professional supervision
Ideally, both supervisor and supervisee should be enthusiastic and committed to developing an open dialogue and two-way relationship.
Yet, regardless of the ethics and professional standards of both the supervisor and supervisee, there is often a weakness, or even a flaw, in the supervision relationship.

This stems from the in-built imbalance of power that exists when a supervisor has both managerial and professional authority in relation to the supervisee.
3.1 Explain factors which result in a power imbalance in professional supervision
What factors do you think could result in this power imbalance?
Davys and Beddoe (2010) identify three sources of this power imbalance within supervision relationships. That is, am imbalance of power can stem from:

1) the supervisor’s legitimate role as line manager

2) the greater authority the supervisor carries as a result of their more extensive professional knowledge and skill

3) the supervisor’s authority position regarding issues of unsafe practice.

Complete first part of activity 8
3.2 Explain how to address power imbalance in own supervision practice
As a supervisor you could seek to minimise the detrimental effects of the power imbalance by:
• creating and sustaining a valued relationship based on protected time, a safe, neutral space to meet (ie not in the supervisor’s office) and agreed boundaries

• being respectful, open and honest in discussing practice and professional development issues

• adopting a person-centred and non-confrontational approach that focuses on the supervisee’s practice and recognises their professional development objectives

• negotiating the supervision agenda, acknowledging and addressing supervisee priorities and genuinely valuing their contributions

• keeping clear and accurate records

• giving regular and constructive feedback.
Complete 2nd Part of Hand Out 8
3.3
Agree with supervisee confidentiality, boundaries, roles and accountability within the professional supervision process
3.4
Agree with supervisee the frequency and location of professional supervision
3.5
Agree with supervisee sources of evidence that can be used to inform professional supervision
3.6
Agree with supervisee actions to be taken in preparation for professional supervision
All of these will need to be covered by WT and DO but post work shop also complete activity 10
4
Be able to provide professional supervision in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings
4.1
Support supervisees to reflect on their practice
4.2
Provide positive feedback about the achievements of the supervisee
4.3
Provide constructive feedback that can be used to improve performance
4.4
Support supervisees to identify their own development needs
4.5
Review and revise professional supervision targets to meet the identified objectives of the work setting
4.6
Support supervisees to explore different methods of addressing challenging situations
4.7
Record agreed supervision decisions
Again these will be covered by WT and DO
5 Be able to manage conflict situations during professional supervision in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings
Conflicts occur within supervision relationships. They tend to happen when there are disputes or disagreements related to professional behaviour, values and the goals of the supervision process.
Conflict can feel very alarming and disruptive when it occurs, as it clearly undermines what is expected to be a constructive, mutually supportive and cooperative relationship. The onus is on you, as supervisor, to manage and ideally resolve conflict that arises in supervision.
The aim of conflict management is to empower the supervisee and enable them to reach a position where consensus can be achieved. The rights and interests of both parties need to be respected as part of this. Both supervisee and supervisor must also acknowledge their responsibilities to find a negotiated solution to the conflict issue and to make the supervision relationship work
In some situations, it is also appropriate to be more assertive with a supervisee and give corrective feedback especially when this relates to under performing.
It is helpful to:
1. describe the behaviour that is causing the problem
2. express your feelings about the behaviour
3. specify what you want the supervisee to do and why
4. clarify the consequences for the supervisee and others of failing to change.
5.1 and 5.2 require you to reflect on your own experiences within this area.
Spend time completing Hand Out 11 giving examples.
Hand Out 12 which are case studies will need to be completed post workshop
6 Be able to evaluate own practice when conducting professional supervision in health and social care or children and young people’s work settings

Again these will be covered by DO and WT but also complete Hand Out 13 as part of Post Work Shop activity.
Overview of entire unit - open summary
Full transcript