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Multiple Choice Review

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Lena Schwallenberg

on 31 January 2013

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Transcript of Multiple Choice Review

Free Fall Into AP Lang Lena, Tory, Brandon, and Joey A Vindication of the Rights of Women by Mary
Wollstonecraft, 1792 To speak disrespectfully of love is, I know, high treason against sentiment and fine feelings; but I wish to speak the simple language of truth, and rather to address the head than the heart. To endeavour to reason love out of the world, would be to out Quixote Cervantes, and equally offend against common sense; but an endeavour to restrain this tumultuous passion, and to prove that it should not be allowed to dethrone superior powers, or to usurp the sceptre which the understanding should ever coolly wield, appears less wild. Youth is the season for love in both sexes; but in those days of thoughtless enjoyment, provision should be made for the more important years of life, when reflection takes place of sensation. But Rousseau, and most of the male writers who have followed his steps, have warmly inculcated that the whole tendency of female education ought to be directed to one point to render them pleasing. Let me reason with the supporters of this opinion, who have any knowledge of human nature, do they imagine that marriage can eradicate the habitude of life? The woman who has only been taught to please, will soon find that her charms are oblique sun-beams, and that they cannot have much effect on her husband's heart when they are seen every day, when the summer is past and gone. Will she then have sufficient native energy to look into herself for comfort, and cultivate her dormant faculties? or, is it not more rational to expect, that she will try to please other men; and, in the emotions raised by the expectation of new conquests, endeavour to forget the mortification her love or pride has received? When the husband ceases to be a lover--and the time will inevitably come, her desire of pleasing will then grow languid, or become a spring of bitterness; and love, perhaps, the most evanescent of all passions, gives place to jealousy or vanity. I now speak of women who are restrained by principle or prejudice; such women though they would shrink from an intrigue with real abhorrence, yet, nevertheless, wish to be convinced by the homage of gallantry, that they are cruelly neglected by their husbands; or, days and weeks are spent in dreaming of the happiness enjoyed by congenial souls, till the health is undermined and the spirits broken by discontent. How then can the great art of pleasing be such a necessary study? it is only useful to a mistress; the chaste wife, and serious mother, should only consider her power to please as the polish of her virtues, and the affection of her husband as one of the comforts that render her task less difficult, and her life happier. But, whether she be loved or neglected, her first wish should be to make herself respectable, and not rely for all her happiness on a being subject to like infirmities with herself. The speaker, who we identified as Mary Wollstonecraft, is an obvious feminist thinker, most likely well educated and highly opinionated in the mindset that women should not devote their lives to serving and pleasing men. Who is the speaker? What are the speaker's motive and
thesis? The speaker's motive is to criticize the limited goals of female education and change the way women relate to men. "But, whether she be loved or neglected, her first wish should be to make herself respectable, and not to rely for all her happiness on a being subject to like infirmities with herself." What is the author's tone? The author's tone is serious and cautionary, though you may have described it as chastising, condemning, logical, or deadpan. She seeks not to offend, but to instead sway the readers in her favor through an essay that appeals to logos instead of ethos or pathos. 40. B Her entire argument is that women should not devote their lives to pleasing and caring for a man. "But Russeau, and most male writers who have followed his steps, have warmly indicated that the whole tendency of female education ought to be directed to one point - to render them pleasing." - Lines 15-19 41. D She is denouncing the notion that women must become singularly resigned to a man's whims. "Will she then have sufficient native energy to look into herself for comfort, and cultivate her dormant faculties?" - Lines 27-29 42. A She begins with a statement of her viewpoint on the subject, a disclaimer of her intentions, and an indication of what she will be discussing later. "...I wish to speak the simple language of truth, and rather to address the head than the heart." - Lines 3-4 43. D She simply refers to the mature years when one reaches adulthood. "The chaste wife and serious mother should only consider her power to please as the polish of her virtues." - Lines 49-50 44. A Despite the fact that this essay is all about logos and logical appeal anyway, we see how she makes a specific cry to the intellects in the text. "Let me reason with the supporters of this opinion who have any knowledge of human nature..." - Lines 20-21 45. E These questions are answered and guided by her own voice and hand, used mostly as a tool to plant seeds of her persuasion in the reader's mind in a way that seems as though it comes from the readers themselves. "Do they imagine that marriage can eradicate the habitude of life? Will she then have sufficient native energy to into herself for comfort, and cultivate her dormant faculties?" - Lines 21-33 46. B As anything fades to commonplace when always seen or exposed to, so these "sunbeams" have become "oblique". "They cannot have much effect on her husband's heart when they are seen every day..." - Lines 25-26 47. D These women have fixed convictions and ways of thought, as they have not known the equality called to in relation to men. "I now speak of women who are restrained by principle or prejudices." Lines 29-30 48. E She exemplifies the concept of this "spring of bitterness"when she discusses how her sunbeams will become oblique, and she will cease to have great impact upon the only thing she has ever been taught to do: pleasing her husband. "They cannot have much effect on her husband's heart when they are seen every day..." - Lines 25-26 49. A The focus of the essay is on women's rights, and so we must understand that her bias and appeal to logos is attempting to rev a call to action into place from those women who have been suppressed by their limited educations and husband's whims. "But whether she be loved or neglected, her first wish should be to make herself respectable, and not to reply for all her happiness on a being subject to like infirmities with herself." - Lines 53-56 50. D Considering this passage is written about a woman's place in her life in relation to men and marriage, it is a safe assumption to say that she relates this "being" to a husband. "...not to rely for all her happiness on a being subject to like infirmities with herself." - Lines 55-56 51. B Her appeal to logos and presentation of clear information represents her reasoned development and argument of her views and opinions. "Let me reason with the supporters of this opinion who have any knowledge of human nature..." - Lines 20-21 52. C The author believes that the head should come before the heart, as logic comes before instinctual emotion. This is portrayed by her appeal to logos instead of pathos or ethos. "To speak disrespectfully of love is, I know, high treason against sentiment and fine feelings; but I wish to speak the simple language of truth, and rather to address the head than the heart." - Lines 1-4 53. C The author remains very stagnant and serious throughout the essay. Never does she use satire or show too much emotion, as exemplified by her own appeal to woman to be more serious and rational. "To speak disrespectfully of love is, I know, high treason against sentiment and fine feelings; but I wish to speak the simple language of truth, and rather to address the head than the heart." - Lines 1-4 54. C She wishes to change the way women see their options, whether they be discussing education or life plans (marriage isn't the only path in life...), allowing them to pursue other horizons. "But whether she be loved or neglected, her first wish should be to make herself respectable, and not to reply for all her happiness on a being subject to like infirmities with herself." - Lines 53-56 Questions? BOOYAH. GO AP OR GO HOME.
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