Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Snow White and the Seven Deadly Sins

Poem Analysis by Chelsey Dawson
by

Chelsey Dawson

on 16 March 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Snow White and the Seven Deadly Sins

Snow White and the Seven Deadly
Sins
by R. S. Gwynn Good Catholic girl, she didn't mind the cleaning.
All of her household chores, at first, were small
And hardly labors one could find demeaning.
One's duty was one's refuge, after all.

And if her had her doubts at certain moments
And once confessed them to the Father, she
Was instantly referred to texts in Romans
And Peter's First Epistle, chapter III.

Years passed. More sinful every day, the Seven
Breakfasted, grabbed their their pitchforks, donned their horns,
And sped to contravene the hopes of heaven,
Sowing the neighbors' lawns with tares and thorns.

She set to work. Pride's wall of looking glasses
Ogled her dimly, smeared with prints of lips;
Lust's magazines lay strewn, bare tits and asses
Weighted by his "devices"-- chains, cuffs, and whips

Gluttony's empties covered half the table,
Mingling with Avarice's cards and chips,
And as she'd been told to sew a Bill Blass label
Inside a blazer Envy'd bought at Gyp's.

Then as she wiped the Windex from the mirror
She noticed, and the vision made her cry,
How much she'd grayed and paled, and how much clearer
Festered the bruise of Wrath beneath her eye.

"No poisoned apple needed for this Princess,"
She murmured, making X's with her thumb.
A car door slammed, bringing her to her senses:
Ho-hum. Ho-hum. It's home from work we come.

And she was out the window in a second,
In time to see a Handsome Prince, of course,
Who, spying her distressed condition, beckoned
For her to mount (What else?) his snow-white horse

Impeccably he spoke. His smile was glowing.
So debonair! So charming! And so Male.
She took a step, reversed and without slowing
Beat it to St. Anne's where she took the veil. Snow White and the Seven Deadly Sins POEM ANALYSIS ASK YOURSELF What is the author saying about the role of women? The role of men?

What does Snow White's ultimate decision symbolize?
A
B
A
B

C
D
C
D

E
F
E
F

G
H
G
H

I
H
I
H
J
K
J
K

L
M
L
M

N
O
N
O

P
Q
P
Q

R
S
R
S Rhyme Scheme Allusion and the First Two Stanzas Gwynn uses an allusion to the Bible, citing Peter's First Epistle and Romans to not only highlight Snow White's Catholicism, but also to showcase the injustices that Snow White was expected to live up to as a Catholic woman... the main injustice being that as a woman she was expected to be submissive to men. The first two stanzas are used to develop how it was seen as a "woman's duty" to clean and complete household chores; the speaker says, "One's duty was one's refuge, after all" (line 4). Here Gwynn makes it clear that at the onset of the poem Snow White felt a sense of security in doing what she was expected to do. Other lines, like "And once she confessed (her uncertainities) to the Father, she/ Was instantly referred to texts in Romans/ and Peter's First Epistle, chapter III" (lines 6-8). insinuate an unsureness of whether of not the role she was expected to fulfill was truly her place-- and that the Father, or symbolically the Catholic Church, refused her fears by saying that according to the Bible it was her duty to be submissive and the "weaker vessel". Analysis of Stanzas 3-7 Years passed. More sinful every day, the Seven
Breakfasted, grabbed their pitchforks, donned their horns,
And sped to contravene the hopes of heaven.
Sowing the neighbors' lawns with tares and thorns.

She set to work. Pride's wall of looking glasses
Ogled her dimly, smeared with prints of lips
Lust's magazines lay strewn, bare tits and asses
Weighted by his "devices"-- chains, cuffs, whips.

Gluttony's empties covered half the table,
Mingling with Avarice's cards and chips
And she'd been told to sew a Bill Blass label
Inside the blazer Envy'd bought at Gyp's

She knelt on the cold master bathroom floor as
If a petitioner before the Pope,
Retrieving a pair of Sloth's soiled drawers
A sweat-sock, and a cake of hairy soap.

Then, as she wiped the Windex from the mirror
She noticed, and the vision made her cry,
How much she'd grayed and paled, and how much clearer
Festered the bruise of Wrath beneath her eye. = one of the Seven
deadly sins These 5 stanzas describe the way which sin was taking over Snow White's life, and devastating effect it has on her. In the seventh stanza, Snow White finally realizes how tired and worn she has grown from dealing with the havoc the Seven Deadly Sins are bringing in her life. It is clear that she is not happy in the situation, and that it is continually growing worse, as the third stanza says, "More sinful every day" (line 9). The worsening of the situation calls for Snow White to find an escape, one which presents itself by the end of the poem. Stanza 8

"No poisoned apple needed for this Princess,"
She murmured, making X's with her thumb.
A car door slammed, bringing her to her senses:
Ho-hum, Ho-hum. It's home from work we come. This stanza is significant because it explains
the extent to which the actions of the sins are
affecting her...they are quite literally killing
her, which is why she feels there is no need for
a poisoned apple, and makes X's with her
thumbs. This shows the immense despair that
comes with a life full of sin, an immense despair
which leaves Snow depressed, and unsure of
what to do. The Ho-Hum is yet another allusion by
Gwynn connecting the poem to the well
known Hi-Ho song in the animated Snow White film. Stanzas 9-10 And she was out the window in a second,
In time to see a Handsome Prince, of course,
Who, spying her distressed condition, beckoned
For her to mount (What else?) his snow-white horse

Impeccably he spoke. His smile was glowing.
So debonair! So charming! And so Male.
She took a step, reversed without slowing
Beat it to St. Anne's where she took the veil. These two stanzas show just how desperate Snow was to
get out of her situation. She ran out the window, and finds
the man of her dreams awaiting her. But, he was Male. And after having spent years of her life being forced to succumb to them, even her Prince Charming wasn't worth it. Leading Snow White to pick a life as a nun, over a life as a wife. It is clear through Snow White's actions just how horrific life as a woman was due to societal pressures...I mean her Prince arrived ready to whisk her away on a horse, but she gave it up because she was tired of living the life that had brought her so little joy.
So, what is the author saying about
the roles of women and men? It is made clear through the ultimate decision of Snow
White that Gwynn believes the role women are forced to fill is not right, and undignified. Snow's decision to run away is not seen to people as an act of weakness, but rather as an act of strength. This is confirmed by the diction used the moment when Snow White comes "to her senses" (line 31) and the positive words used to express the determination Snow has as she leaves.

In contrast, males are generally equated with sin throughout the entire poem. The author relates each man to a sin, and even the Prince is ultimately not good enough for Snow White because he shares the commonality of being male with the Seven Dwarfs/Sinners. Throughout the poem men are doing what are seen as typical things such as gambling, eating, making a mess, and being cocky-- actions which portray the men in an incredibly negative light and showcase the author's belief that they are not the "superior" gender as suggested in the Biblical references made at the onset of the poem.
Why all the allusions?
Gwynn uses very specific allusions,
both the Bible and the classic fairy
tale Snow White. She strategically
uses the Bible to expand on the
cause of societal pressures, where
she uses a universal story like Snow
White to see how the affect men
have on women is also universal.
Conclusion R. S. Gwynn's well-crafted poem is used to show the
ridiculous expectations women were forced to bear, and the consequences those expectations had on women. But, Gwynn's poem is not only to point out the flaws in society, but also can be used to empower women and show that there can be a happily ever after for them without a man. Gwynn's poem shows people everywhere that women are not just good for cleaning, cooking and sex, and that failure to realize that will not stop a girl from walking out. This poem puts a realistic twist on a fairy tale, one which calls the readers to wake up and realize that a handsome prince will not solve all of their problems, in fact he might just end up being the biggest problem of all.
Full transcript