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Social Networking for Education

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Frank Bannon

on 18 November 2014

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Transcript of Social Networking for Education

Social Networking in
Education

What is Twitter?
What is Facebook?
Why do they use it?
Why do they use it?
What kind of information is published?
Who's already using it?
Who's already using it?
Facebook is a global social networking website that is operated and privately owned by Facebook, Inc.[1] Users can add friends and send them messages, and update their personal profiles to notify friends about themselves. Additionally, users can join networks organized by city, workplace, school, and region. (Wikipedia)
Can Twitter be secure?
Can Facebook be secure?
Twitter is a free social networking and micro-blogging service that enables its users to send and read messages known as tweets. Tweets are text-based posts of up to 140 characters displayed on the author's profile page and delivered to the author's subscribers who are known as followers. Senders can restrict delivery to those in their circle of friends or, by default, allow open access. Users can send and receive tweets via the Twitter website, Short Message Service (SMS) or external applications. (Wikipedia)

Twitter in Plain English:
SMS is Text Messaging
Passwords must be secured so that they cannot be guessed. If Tweets are posted by cell phone, security codes should be used.

Settings restrict access so that the feed only contains the sender's Tweets (updates). Therefore, communication can be a one way street.
And many more
Recipients choose to receive the information and can subscribe and unsubscribe themselves. (No management on sender's side.)
Updates are pushed to followers via text message or RSS feed.
Updates are easy to identify and locate.
Messages are short, to the point, and timely.
If our service is down, it is unlikely theirs will be, so it would provide another avenue for communication.
It's free, easy to use, and embraced by an enormous audience.
Our model has been to change the front page of our website to announce these kinds of updates. For the district's purpose, this sort of update would be an additional notification that would go out to the recipient instead of the recipient having to come and get it.

Example District Tweets:

-Northfield Elementary closed Ocotober 23, 24, 25 due to H1N1. Read more at http://www.school.edu/flunews

-Happy Thanksgiving! Be safe and return to school November 30. http://www.conroeisd.net/calendar/09-10calendar.pdf

-All SFISD schools closed tomorrow. Hurricane predicted to make landfall at Galveston at 5 p.m. CST. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/
For campuses and organizations, Twitter could be more convenient than updating a website with this kind of information:

-RHS vs SHS, 63:45 Go Bulldogs!

-Tonight's game canceled due to weather. Check back for information about when it will be rescheduled.

-Orchestra gets highest marks at UIL competition
What kind of information is published?
Use in Past Emergencies
New Scientist in May 2008 [86] found that . . . instant messaging systems like Twitter did a better job of getting information out during emergencies than either the traditional news media or government emergency services.
Twitter can update Facebook automatically.
CIPA (Children's Internet Protection Act) Update:
-----------
“Education, not mandatory blocking and filtering, is the best way to protect and prepare America’s students.”

-Joint Statement of ISTE and CoSN Hailing Passage of Internet Safety Education Legislation
Facebook, like Twitter, can be set up so that it is a street. Readers (or "Friends") can choose to view updates, yet the owner can choose not to allow them to post back to the owner's wall. See below for information about extensive security options.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/083009dnmettwitter.3c698cd.html
The Fort Worth school district uses Facebook and Twitter.

"It's not an either-or situation," spokeswoman Barbara Griffith said. "If there's a way to communicate, we want to use it."
"Though the sites won't replace the more traditional forms of communication anytime soon, they provide another way to reach out to plugged-in parents, residents without kids and even students themselves."
http://nextcommunications.blogspot.com/2009/04/texas-school-districts-on-twitter.html
Recipients choose to receive the information and can subscribe and unsubscribe themselves. (No management on sender's side.)
Updates are pushed to followers in their personalized notifications area.
Updates are easy to identify and locate.
Messages are short, to the point, and timely.
If our service is down, it is unlikely theirs will be, so it would provide another avenue for communication.
It's free, easy to use, and embraced by an enormous audience.
Photos, events, videos, and updates are equally easy to post from any smart phone or computer.
Facebook gives readers a sense of "knowing" an individual, school, or organization.
September 24, 2009

Americans have nearly tripled the amount of time they spend at social networking and blog sites such as Facebook and MySpace from a year ago, according to a new report from The Nielsen Company. In August 2009, 17 percent of all time spent on the Internet was at social networking sites, up from 6 percent in August 2008.

“This growth suggests a wholesale change in the way the Internet is used,” said Jon Gibs, vice president, media and agency insights, Nielsen’s online division.
When the next hurricane or other natural disaster strikes our area, odds are that Facebook will still be up and that we can access it in some way (most likely via text or smart phone) and maintain communications with each other and the public.
Facebook Statistics . . . (11/22/2009)
More than 300 million active users
50% of users log on to Facebook on any given day
The fastest growing demographic is 35 years old and older
More than 8 billion minutes are spent on Facebook each day (worldwide)
More than 45 million status updates each day
More than 10 million users become fans of pages each day
Districts are Facebooking statistics about enrollment, H1N1 information, photos and information from public events.
They are also offering polls, for example, voting on proposed calendars (College Station ISD).
Thanking/inviting community and/or business partners on Facebook could promote involvement.
Read for a Better Life, Change for Change (and other initiatives) could be announced, promoted, and updated using Facebook.
All of the benefits of Twitter are included in Facebook, but there are many additional features.
http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/report_in_emergencies_people_turn_to_social_media.php
"There is nothing to stop someone with an axe to grind from starting a scatalogical CISD page right now. Not occupying the space in a positive and professional manner simply leaves open the need to play catchup with a student, parent, or tax[payer]...".
-Posting on Facebook from CISD Teacher
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/083009dnmettwitter.3c698cd.html
http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/social-networking-and-blog-sites-capture-more-internet-time-and-advertisinga/
http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2009/09/schools_turn_to_facebook_twitt.html
. . . and both can serve as emergency broadcast systems.
http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/report_in_emergencies_people_turn_to_social_media.php
New Scientist in May 2008 [86] found that . . . instant messaging systems like Twitter did a better job of getting information out during emergencies than either the traditional news media or government emergency services.
Use in Past Emergencies
"New" Obligation (Fall 2008)
The Broadband Data Improvement Act Title II: Protecting Children in the 21st Century Act, passed in the fall of 2008, added a new educational requirement to CIPA: A school or library must certify that

`(iii) as part of its Internet safety policy is educating minors about appropriate online behavior, including interacting with other individuals on social networking websites and in chat rooms and cyberbullying awareness and response.'
http://www.commoncraft.com/Twitter
Social Networking in Plain English:
http://www.commoncraft.com/video-social-networking
The Mars Phoenix Tweets
Cisd 2010
CISD 1999
Full transcript