Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Aztec Sun Stone

The Aztec Sun Stone
by

Farid Jack

on 4 March 2011

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Aztec Sun Stone

The Aztec

Sun Stone
The Sun Stone commemorates
the creation of 5 worlds in Aztec mythology. The original Calendar is a 12' massive stone slab, carved in the middle of the 15th century. Many renditions of it exist and have existed through the years and through Mexico. The Calendar consisted of 365 days and had a 260 day ritual cycle. The 2 cycles together formed a 52 year century. Each Month has it's own name, and the days of the month are numered 1-20.

Flayed According to Mexica belief, earth's earliest inhabitants were devoured by jaguars. The demise of the second sun brought destruction by great winds. The third era ended with fiery rain, while the fourth sun was extinguished by massive floods. Twenty Days of the Aztec Month
Snake - Coatl
Lizard - Cuetzpallin
House - Calli
Wind - Ehecatl
Crocodile - Cipactli
Flower - Xochitl
Rain - Quiahuitl
Flint - Tecpatl
Movement - Ollin
Vulture - Cozcacuauhtli
Eagle - Cuauhtle
Jaguar - Ocelotl
Cane - Acatl
Herb - Malinalli
Monkey - Ozomatli
Hairless Dog - Itzquintli
Water - Atl
Rabbit - Tochtli
Deer - Mazatl
Skull - Miquiztli
Third Ring - Sun Rays - Chalchihuite Ornaments - Splashed Blood Symbols
Outer Ring - Dedication Plate - Herbs with Buds - White Scrolls - Flame Sign - Xiucoatl's Tail On December 17th, 1790 the stone was discovered, buried in the "Zocalo" (the main square) of Mexico City. The viceroy of New Spain at the time was don Joaquin de Monserrat, Marquis of Cruillas. Afterwards it was embedded in the wall of the Western tower of the metropolitan Cathedral, where it remained until 1885. At that time it was transferred to the national Museum of Archaeology and History by order of the then President of the Republic, General Porfirio Diaz. The artist carved the Aztec calendar stone in 1479. Naturally, it was dedicated to the sun god. It was a massive carving, 3 feet thick, almost 12 feet across, and weighing almost 25 tones (22.5 tonnes). It was carved from basalt - a solidified lava, this being an area where volcanos were common On December 17th, 1790 the stone was discovered, buried in the "Zocalo" (the main square) of Mexico City. The viceroy of New Spain at the time was don Joaquin de Monserrat, Marquis of Cruillas. Afterwards it was embedded in the wall of the Western tower of the metropolitan Cathedral, where it remained until 1885. At that time it was transferred to the national Museum of Archaeology and History by order of the then President of the Republic, General Porfirio Diaz.
Names of the Months

I. Atlacacauallo (ceasing of water)
Tlaloc, Chachihutlicue
Children sacrificed to water gods

II. Tlacaxipehualiztli (flaying of men)
Xipe-Totec
Gladiatorial sacrifice; dances by priest wearing the flayed skin of victims

III. Tozoztontli (little vigil)
Coatlicue, Tlaloc
Flayed skins buried, child sacrifices

IV. Hueytozoztli (great vigil)
Centeotl, Chicomecacoatl
Blessing of new corn; maiden sacrificed

V. Toxcatl (dryness)
Tezcatlipoca, Huitzilopochtli
Impersonators of these major gods sacrificed

VI. Etzalcualiztli (meal of maize & beans)
Tlaloques
Impersonators of water deities sacrificed by drowning; ritual bathing and dances

VII. Tecuilhuitontli (small feast of the lords)
Huixtocihuatl, Xochipilli
Impersonators of the gods sacrificed; ceremony of salt workers

VIII. Hueytecuihutli (great feast of the lords)
Xilonen
Feast for goddess of young corn, lords offer gifts and feast for commoners

IX. Tlaxochimaco (birth of flowers)
Huizilopochtli
All the gods festooned with garlands; feasting on corn-meal cakes and turkey

X. Xocotlhuetzin (fall of fruit)
Hueymiccaihuitl (great feast of the dead)
Xiuhtecuhtli
Ceremonial pole climbing competition
Sacrifice to fire gods by roasting victims alive

XI. Ochpaniztli (sweeping of the roads)
Tlazolteotl
Sweeping of house and roads; mock combat

XII. Teoleco (return of the gods)
Tezcatlipoca
Ceremonies welcoming gods returning to earth; ceremonial drunkenness, sacrifices by fire

XIII. Tepeihuitl (feast of the hills)
Tlaloc
Ceremonies for mountain rain gods; human sacrifices and ceremonial cannibalism

XIV. Quecholli (precious feather)
Mixcoatl-Camaxtli
Ritualistic hunt following fast; sacrifice of game and ceremonial feasting

XV. Panquetzaliztli (raising of the banner)
Huitzilopochtli
Homes and fruit trees decorated with paper banners; race-procession; massive sacrifices

XVI. Atemoztli (water decends)
Tlaloc
Festival honoring water gods; children and slaves sacrificed

XVII. Tititl (stretching)
Llamatecuhtli
Sympathetic magic to bring rain; women beaten with straw-filled bags to make them cry

XVIII. Izcalli (resuscitation)
Xiuhtecuhtli
Image of god made from amaranth dough; feasting on tamales stuffed with greens
Nemontemi (empty days) Five unlucky days; no rituals, general fasting Names of the Months
I. Atlacacauallo (ceasing of water)
Tlaloc, Chachihutlicue
Children sacrificed to water gods

II. Tlacaxipehualiztli (flaying of men)
Xipe-Totec
Gladiatorial sacrifice; dances by priest wearing the flayed skin of victims

III. Tozoztontli (little vigil)
Coatlicue, Tlaloc
Flayed skins buried, child sacrifices

IV. Hueytozoztli (great vigil)
Centeotl, Chicomecacoatl
Blessing of new corn; maiden sacrificed

V. Toxcatl (dryness)
Tezcatlipoca, Huitzilopochtli
Impersonators of these major gods sacrificed

VI. Etzalcualiztli (meal of maize & beans)
Tlaloques
Impersonators of water deities sacrificed by drowning; ritual bathing and dances

VII. Tecuilhuitontli (small feast of the lords)
Huixtocihuatl, Xochipilli
Impersonators of the gods sacrificed; ceremony of salt workers

VIII. Hueytecuihutli (great feast of the lords)
Xilonen
Feast for goddess of young corn, lords offer gifts and feast for commoners

IX. Tlaxochimaco (birth of flowers)
Huizilopochtli
All the gods festooned with garlands; feasting on corn-meal cakes and turkey

X. Xocotlhuetzin (fall of fruit)
Hueymiccaihuitl (great feast of the dead)
Xiuhtecuhtli
Ceremonial pole climbing competition
Sacrifice to fire gods by roasting victims alive

XI. Ochpaniztli (sweeping of the roads)
Tlazolteotl
Sweeping of house and roads; mock combat

XII. Teoleco (return of the gods)
Tezcatlipoca
Ceremonies welcoming gods returning to earth; ceremonial drunkenness, sacrifices by fire

XIII. Tepeihuitl (feast of the hills)
Tlaloc
Ceremonies for mountain rain gods; human sacrifices and ceremonial cannibalism

XIV. Quecholli (precious feather)
Mixcoatl-Camaxtli
Ritualistic hunt following fast; sacrifice of game and ceremonial feasting

XV. Panquetzaliztli (raising of the banner)
Huitzilopochtli
Homes and fruit trees decorated with paper banners; race-procession; massive sacrifices

XVI. Atemoztli (water decends)
Tlaloc
Festival honoring water gods; children and slaves sacrificed

XVII. Tititl (stretching)
Llamatecuhtli
Sympathetic magic to bring rain; women beaten with straw-filled bags to make them cry

XVIII. Izcalli (resuscitation)
Xiuhtecuhtli
Image of god made from amaranth dough; feasting on tamales stuffed with greens

Nemontemi (empty days) Five unlucky days; no rituals, general fasting I. Atlacacauallo (ceasing of water)
Tlaloc, Chachihutlicue
Children sacrificed to water gods

II. Tlacaxipehualiztli (flaying of men)
Xipe-Totec
Gladiatorial sacrifice; dances by priest wearing the flayed skin of victims

III.Tozoztontli (little vigil)
Coatlicue, Tlaloc
Flayed skins buried, child sacrifices

IV.Hueytozoztli (great vigil)
Centeotl, Chicomecacoatl
Blessing of new corn; maiden sacrificed

V.Toxcatl (dryness)
Tezcatlipoca, Huitzilopochtli
Impersonators of these major gods sacrificed

VI.Etzalcualiztli (meal of maize & beans)
Tlaloques
Impersonators of water deities sacrificed by drowning; ritual bathing and dances

VII. Tecuilhuitontli (small feast of the lords)
Huixtocihuatl, Xochipilli
Impersonators of the gods sacrificed; ceremony of salt workers

VIII. Hueytecuihutli (great feast of the lords)
Xilonen
Feast for goddess of young corn, lords offer gifts and feast for commoners

IX.Tlaxochimaco (birth of flowers)
Huizilopochtli
All the gods festooned with garlands; feasting on corn-meal cakes and turkey

X. Xocotlhuetzin (fall of fruit)
Hueymiccaihuitl (great feast of the dead)
Xiuhtecuhtli
Ceremonial pole climbing competition
Sacrifice to fire gods by roasting victims alive

XI. Ochpaniztli (sweeping of the roads)
Tlazolteotl
Sweeping of house and roads; mock combat

XII. Teoleco (return of the gods)
Tezcatlipoca
Ceremonies welcoming gods returning to earth; ceremonial drunkenness, sacrifices by fire

XIII. Tepeihuitl (feast of the hills)
Tlaloc
Ceremonies for mountain rain gods; human sacrifices and ceremonial cannibalism

XIV. Quecholli (precious feather)
Mixcoatl-Camaxtli
Ritualistic hunt following fast; sacrifice of game and ceremonial feasting

XV. Panquetzaliztli (raising of the banner)
Huitzilopochtli
Homes and fruit trees decorated with paper banners; race-procession; massive sacrifices

XVI. Atemoztli (water decends)
Tlaloc
Festival honoring water gods; children and slaves sacrificed

XVII. Tititl (stretching)
Llamatecuhtli
Sympathetic magic to bring rain; women beaten with straw-filled bags to make them cry

XVIII. Izcalli (resuscitation)
Xiuhtecuhtli
Image of god made from amaranth dough; feasting on tamales stuffed with greens

Nemontemi (empty days) Five unlucky days; no rituals, general fasting The Aztecs believed they lived during the age of the Fifth Sun.
They, and the Fifth sun, ended when Cortez landed and slaughtered them. It took 52 years to complete The Aztec calendar faced south in a vertical position
and was painted a vibrant red, blue, yellow and white. The stone was buried by the Spaniards when they conquered
Tenochtitlan. The stone was lost for over 250 years until December of 1790 when it was found by accident during repair work
on the cathedral.
Full transcript