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Figurative Language

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by

Christy Murgiano

on 16 September 2013

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Transcript of Figurative Language

Figurative
Language

By Christy Murgiano
Simile
Personification
Sourse:
http://www.gocomics.com/pearlsbeforeswine/2013/09/13
Allusion
Assonance
Source:
My Fair Lady, spoken by Eliza Doolittle, played by Audrey Hepburn
Metaphor
Hyperbole
Alliteration
Onomatopoeia
Idiom
Oxymoron
Cliche
Pun
"We Didn’t Start the Fire" by Billy Joel, has over 100 allusions including Harry Truman, Joe DiMaggio,
Joe McCarthy, Marilyn Monroe, "Wheel of Fortune", and the "The King and I" to name a few.
"Like a Rolling Stone" by Bob Dylan, compares a woman who once had a lot of money but is now poor and on her own to a rolling stone. This might be saying that she is in a downward spiral and it is hard to stop, similar to a rolling stone.
How does it feel?
How does it feel,
To be on your own,
With no direction home,
Like a complete unknown,
Like a rolling stone?
In "I'm Already There" by Lonestar, a father who is on the road is calling home to his family. He uses several metaphors to tell his family he is there with them.
Source:
http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/bobdylan/likearollingstone.html
I'm already there.
Take a look around.
I'm the sunshine in your hair.
I'm the shadow on the ground.

Source:
http://www.metrolyrics.com/im-already-there-lyrics-lonestar.html
I'm the whisper in the wind.
I'm your imaginary friend.
And I know, I'm in your prayers.
Oh I'm already there.
Source:
http://www.cleveland.com/comics-kingdom/?feature_id=Zits&feature_date=2013-09-13
Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
http://www.gocomics.com/getfuzzy
Source:
http://store.mentalfloss.com/the-mental_floss-store/T-Shirts/Geology-Rocks-T-Shirt
Source:
http://www.metrolyrics.com/true-colors-lyrics-phil-collins.html


When Bucky threw the golf ball at Wilco it made a "Bonk." "Bonk" is an example of onomatopoeia because it sounds like it is spelled.
This common tongue twister is definitely an alliteration because it has six words starting with the same letter in the same sentence.
This comic strip is a hyperbole because Jeremy can't possibly drop dead from humiliation.
This is personification because the writer is giving the animals the human characteristic of talking.
And I'll see your true colors
Shining through.
I see your true colors
And that's why I love you.
So don't be afraid to let them show.
Your true colors
True colors are beautiful,
Like a rainbow.
"True Colors" by Phil Collins, has an idiom as the title. The phrase is meant to describe who you really are, but if you look at the two words separately you wouldn't guess that's what they mean put together.
This is a print for a t-shirt. It is a pun because it makes joke using the words "rocks". The first meaning being that something is great and the other meaning actual rocks.
The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plains.
This is an assonance because the vowel sound is repeating throughout the sentence.
A "firetruck" can be an oxymoron because it is uses water. As the comic strip suggests, it might be better to call it a "watertruck."
Source:
http://www.cleveland.com/comics-kingdom/?feature_id=Bizarro&feature_date=2013-09-08
Love is in the air
Everywhere I look around
Love is in the air
Every sight and every sound
Source:
http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/j/john_paul_young/love_is_in_the_air.html
"Love is in the Air" by John Paul Young, has a cliche title. The phrase "love is in the air" is a cliche because it is overused.
Source:
Roud Folk Song Index, #19745
http://library.efdss.org/ and
Peter Piper's Practical Principles of Plain and Perfect Pronunciation by John Harris
Full transcript