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Lady Macbeth

Introduction
by

N Dorking

on 28 June 2013

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Transcript of Lady Macbeth

A Disturbed Character
Lady Macbeth
Let's recap the story of Macbeth
Now to get it into writing!
Read through the summary sheet you have been given.

Can you remember any reasons why we might refer to Lady Macbeth as disturbed?
Writers' ideas.
Language and structure.
Social and historical context.
REMEMBER:
Hie thee hither,
That I may pour my spirits in thine ear
And chastise with the valor of my tongue
All that impedes thee from the golden round,
Come, you spirits
That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
Of direst cruelty.
Band 4
What do we already know?
What do we need to learn?
We need to talk about:
Homework:
Research the context and background to the play 'Macbeth' and the character of Lady Macbeth.
Consider the power of women at the time and the idea of religious Vs spiritual ideas.
Lady Macbeth's Soliloquy
Look up 'soliloquy' in the dictionary and make a note of the definition in your book!
Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be
What thou art promised. Yet do I fear thy nature;
It is too full o' th' milk of human kindness
To catch the nearest way:
You are thane of Glamis and Cawdor, and you’re going to be king, just like you were promised. But I worry about whether or not you have what it takes to seize the crown.
Hurry home so I can persuade you and talk you out of whatever’s keeping you from going after the crown.
Who has the power in the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth?
Which word/phrase from the extract above shows this?
Lady Macbeth's Soliloquy
Come, you spirits that asist murderous thoughts, make me less like a woman and more like a man, and fill me from head to toe with deadly cruelty!
Lady Macbeth reads of her husband's meeting with the witches and their prophecies; she vows to do everything in her power to encourage him to kill Duncan, thus helping the prophecies become reality.
What does the above quote suggest about males and females at the time?
Make thick my blood.
Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
That no compunctious visitings of nature
Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between
The effect and it!
Thicken my blood and clog up my veins so I won’t feel remorse, so that no human compassion can stop my evil plan or prevent me from accomplishing it!
What does the use of the exclamation mark show?
Why does Shakespeare keep referring to nature and the body in this soliloquy?
What could you say about the underlined words?
Come to my woman’s breasts,
And take my milk for gall, you murd'ring ministers,
Wherever in your sightless substances
You wait on nature’s mischief.
Come to my female breast and turn my mother’s milk into poisonous acid, you murdering demons, wherever you hide, invisible and waiting to do evil!
What could you say about the underlined phrases?

Look up
sibilance
in the dictionary.

What effect does Shakespeare's use of sibilance have on the way we read Lady Macbeth's soliloquy here?
Consider her tone.
Come thick night,
And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,
That my keen knife see not the wound it makes.
Come, thick night, and cover the world in the darkest smoke of hell, so that my sharp knife can’t see the wound it cuts open.
Consider how you could compare this quote and the attitude of Lady Macbeth here with the speaker in The Laboratory.
Persuading Macbeth
Act 1 Scene 7
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00qb5jn
Read through the scene and make notes on Lady Macbeth.
Look for examples of Shakespeare's use of the following which make her appear disturbed:
Rhetorical questions
Reference to nature and maternal instincts
Juxtaposition
Repetition
Intensifiers
Onomatopoeia
Key Quotes
From the extracts we have looked at so far, pick out ONE key quote that shows how Lady Macbeth is presented as disturbed.

Now put it in the centre of a mind-map and think about everything you could possibly say about that one quote.

REMEMBER: It is better to say a lot about a little, than a little about a lot.
The Deed is Done
Guilty
Band 5
These deeds must not be thought
After these ways. So, it will make us mad.
We can't think that way about what we did. If we do, it will drive us crazy.
How does this line from Lady Macbeth foreshadow later events?
Act 5 Scene 1
Here, Shakespeare switches from writing in blank verse (with iambic pentameter) to prose.

It has been suggested that he did this when focusing on the insane characters in his plays.
Make notes on Lady Macbeth and the way she is seen by others.
(How does the way she is seen by others differ to The Laboratory?)

Look out for:
Repetition
Incomplete sentences
Pauses
Metaphor
Read through the scene
This scene is the last time we see Lady Macbeth on stage.
Act 5 Scene 5
The queen, my lord, is dead.
Why do you think Shakespeare didn't give more attention to Lady Macbeth's suicide?
Developed appreciation of writers' ideas and attitudes with convincing interpretations backed by quotes.
Analysis of language and structure in convincing detail.
Developed links/comparisons between texts.
Thoughtful consideration of the context of texts.
Sophisticated engagement with writers' ideas and attitudes with imaginatively selected quotes.
Sophisticated analysis of language and structure.
Perceptive and imaginative exploration of links/comparisons between texts.
Suicide
Full transcript