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You choose!

This was created to help illustrate new ways teens might want to learn about decision making.
by

Ruth Diaz

on 31 January 2014

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Transcript of You choose!

You Choose!
the phillosophy of chosing
Choosing what I'm good at
Getting chosen is good too!
The type of relationship I choose....
When it feels like the relationship chooses me!
Where do you want to go?
Right now I feel like....
harnessing emotions to make good choices
its not just an award
Best Apps for making Good Decisions
when choices feel magical
teen choice
are you a reader?
best books on decision making
http://www.amazon.com/Who-Decides-Abortion-Rights-Reproductive/dp/0275983218
http://www.amazon.com/Why-Choose-This-Book-Decisions/dp/0525949828/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1390879006&sr=1-1&keywords=why+choose+this+book
growing a relationship that lasts
choosing for the future
CHOICE is everywhere
our choices
shape us &
make us
stop,
grow, and change direction

This prezi was made to help you learn more about making choices.

Zoom in and out as you want to find new ways to make decisions about issues important to you now!
This is your last chance. After this, there is no turning back. You take the blue pill – the story ends, you wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take the red pill – you stay in Wonderland, and I show you how deep the rabbit hole goes. Remember, all I'm offering is the truth – nothing more.
the choosing hat
“Heroes are made by the paths they choose, not the powers they are graced with.”
― Brodi Ashton, Everneath
“There are two primary choices in life: to accept conditions as they exist, or accept the responsibility for changing them”
― Denis Waitley

choose a hat!
the idea of aiming for a goal like a degree can be daunting. Here are some ways to make the process bite sized!
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/decision-maker-app/id674011734?mt=8
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/choicemap/id632370293
decision
maker
choice map
http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7385390n
the seven principles of magical thinking
finding control
http://decisioneducation.org/
find out what
rocks
about decision making!
hint
issues
decisions
life
REAL
hard work
http://www.ted.com/talks/molly_crockett_beware_neuro_bunk.html
You Choose!
A tiny part of the brain may be what’s behind your big decisions.

Canadian scientists say they’ve discovered that a part of the brain called the lateral habenula may help us make major cost-benefit decisions like buying a new house.

The study “suggests that the scientific community has misunderstood the true functioning of this mysterious, but important, region of the brain,” study author Dr. Stan Floresco, a behavioral neuroscientist at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, said in a statement.

The new research was published Nov. 24 in Nature Neuroscience.

The lateral habenula is one of the smallest parts of the brain. Scientists previously linked it to depressive symptoms when they saw patients improve when the part was turned off through deep brain stimulation, a procedure where electrodes are implanted in the brain and controlled by a pacemaker.

The structure had also been thought to be involved in avoidance behavior.

Evolutionarily, the lateral habenula had been considered to be one of the oldest regions of the brain, according to the scientists -- they just might not have realized what it actually did.

In a lab experiment, scientists led by Floresco and UBC colleague Colin Stopper trained rats to pick between a task that gave them a consistent, but small reward of one food pellet or a task that took longer but could potentially give them a larger haul of four pellets.

The rats acted like people would: They tended to choose the larger rewards when the amount of time they had to wait before receiving the pellets -- the “costs” -- were low, but they picked the smaller rewards as the time lags increased.

Essentially they decided "what's better for me?" according to the researchers.

However when the scientists turned off the lateral habenula, the rats selected either option equally, no longer showing the ability to pick the best option.

That surprised the researchers, who expected the rats to choose the larger, riskier reward more often due to the previous research that has linked the brain region to avoidance behaviors.

Previous studies that found the depression benefits may have also been misinterpreted, they said. What may have been happening in those patients were changes in decision-making.

“Our findings suggest these improvements may not be because patients feel happier. They may simply no longer care as much about what is making them feel depressed.”

It may sound surprising scientists are finding out new information about something so studied like the brain, but it’s not totally foreign for researchers to discover new functions for body parts.

In Nov., Belgian surgeons discovered a “new” ligament in the knee, the anterolateral ligament (ALL), that previously was thought to be a part of the ACL that may tear during knee injuries.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/scientists-discover-decision-making-brain-structure/
decisions in the brain
the secret to decision making
what some see when they try and decide about the future
want to know more
http://www.bu.edu/buniverse/view/?v=hwn4lLk

abstinence
harm reduction
real life
choices
why we choose suicide
teen brains
how does a teenage brain make decisions?
even rolling the dice is choice
how to get back up
http://streetsmartleader.com/tag/leaders/
http://www.iamplify.com/store/product_details/Philosophy-Talk/Gut-Feelings/product_id/9778
decision making in the 60's
decision art
Full transcript