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Pottery

Pottery presentation for Learning Studio
by

Aika S.U

on 16 June 2009

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Transcript of Pottery

Pottery Pottery: ware, such as vases, pots, bowls, or plates, shaped from moist clay and hardened by heat.
Aika SU 6A3 The Wheel

The potter's wheel. In the process that is called "throwing" (coming from the Old English word thrawan, which means to twist or turn ) , a ball of clay is placed in the center of a turntable, called the wheel-head, which the potter rotates with a stick, or with foot power (a kick wheel or treadle wheel) or with a variable speed electric motor. (Often, a disk of plastic, wood or plaster — called a bat — is first set on the wheel-head, and the ball of clay is thrown on the bat rather than the wheel-head so that the finished piece can be removed intact with its bat, without distortion.) From around 7th century BC until the introduction of slip casting in the 18th century AD, the potter's wheel was the most effective method of mass producing pottery, although it is also often employed to make individual pieces. Wheel-work makes great demands on the skill of the potter, but an accomplished operator can make many near-identical plates, vases, or bowls in the course of a day's work. Because of its inherent limitations, wheel-work can only be used to create wares with radial symmetry on a vertical axis. These can then be altered by impressing, bulging, carving, fluting, faceting, incising, and by other methods making the wares more visually interesting. Often, thrown pieces are further modified by having handles, lids, feet, spouts, and other functional aspects added using the techniques of handworking. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pottery Handbuilding Handwork or hand building. This is the earliest and the most individualized and direct forming method. Wares can be constructed by hand from coils of clay, from flat slabs of clay, from solid balls of clay — or some combination of these. Parts of hand-built vessels are often joined together with the aid of slurry or slip, a runny mixture of clay and water. Hand building is slower and more gradual than wheel-throwing, but it offers the potter a high degree of control over the size and shape of wares. While it isn't difficult for an experienced potter to make identical pieces of hand-built pottery, the speed and repetitiveness of wheel-throwing is more suitable for making precisely matched sets of wares such as table wares. Some studio potters find hand building more conducive to fully using the imagination to create one-of-a-kind works of art, while others find this with the wheel. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pottery Glazing Glazing Techniches ~Dipping
~Spraying
~Finger slattering

Glaze is made up
of many chemicals
so there are many
colors and techtures. Pictures of Pottery Things I Learned Spray glazing
From around 7th century BC until the introduction of slip casting in the 18th century AD, the potter's wheel was the most effective method of mass producing pottery.
Often, thrown pieces are further modified by having handles, lids, feet, spouts, and other functional aspects added using the techniques of handworking.

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