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Copy of MCC3.MD.2 Third Grade Liquid Volumes and Masses

Common Core five lesson unit on third grade standard MCC3.MD.2 (liquid volumes and masses)
by

Kathryn Waters

on 9 April 2014

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Transcript of Copy of MCC3.MD.2 Third Grade Liquid Volumes and Masses

MCC.3.MD.2
Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l).
Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

Liquid
Volume

Mass
Liquid Volume and Mass
Essential Question:
How can we estimate and measure masses and liquid volumes?

What does
measure
mean?
Measure
(verb): to find the size or amount
What does
estimate
mean?
Estimate
(verb): to infer the approximate
size, value, amount, or cost of
based on experience, or observation
What is a
unit
?
Unit
(noun): a single amount that is used as a standard of measurement
The dollar bill is a standard
unit
of money in the United States of America.
Nate, can you
estimate
about how many marbles are in the jar?

Miriam used a ruler to
measure
the length of her pencil.
Lesson 1 : Mass
Lesson 2: Mass
Lesson 3
Wordsplash Warm-Up: Write students' responses in the space below.
Wordsplash Warm-Up: Write students' responses in the space below.
Wordsplash Warm-Up: Write students' responses in the space below.
Mass
(noun): a quantity of matter
A paperclip has a
mass

of about one gram.
How do we measure
mass
with a scale
?
Student Worksheet
"How many Grams?" First, estimate the mass and then weigh objects around the room in
grams (g)
.
Guided Practice:
Students estimate mass and weigh objects around the classroom in grams.
Name Date
Grams (g)
Paperclip = 1 g

Write your name on a sticky note, then answer the question.
Place the note in the circle.
What would be a reasonable estimate for the weight of a pencil in grams?
Language of the Standard
Explain the Vocabulary Warm-Up
A student sits or stands with their back toward the board as vocabulary words or phrases are revealed behind them. Volunteers explain the meaning of the terms (without saying the word, "sounds like," or "rhymes with").
Vocabulary Warm-Up
A student sits or stands with their back toward the board as content-specific vocabulary words or phrases are revealed behind them. Volunteers explain the meaning of the terms (without saying the word, "sounds like," or "rhymes with").
unit
Vocabulary Warm-Up
A student sits or stands with their back toward the board as content-specific vocabulary words or phrases are revealed behind them. Volunteers explain the meaning of the terms (without saying the word, "sounds like," or "rhymes with").
measure
Vocabulary Warm-Up
A student sits or stands with their back toward the board as content-specific vocabulary words or phrases are revealed behind them. Volunteers explain the meaning of the terms (without saying the word, "sounds like," or "rhymes with").
estimate
Vocabulary Warm-Up
A student sits or stands with their back toward the board as content-specific vocabulary words or phrases are revealed behind them. Volunteers explain the meaning of the terms (without saying the word, "sounds like," or "rhymes with").
1,000 grams
=
1 Kilogram
Explain the Vocabulary Warm-Up
A student sits or stands with their back toward the board as content-specific vocabulary words or phrases are revealed behind them. Volunteers explain the meaning of the terms (without saying the word, "sounds like," or "rhymes with").
equal 1
Explain the Vocabulary Warm-Up
A student sits or stands with their back toward the board as content-specific vocabulary words or phrases are revealed behind them. Volunteers explain the meaning of the terms (without saying the word, "sounds like," or "rhymes with").
kilogram (kg).
Direct Instruction / Guided Practice
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide
to solve one-step word problems involving masses.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
MCC3.MD.2
Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

Essential Question:
How can we use the four operations to measure and estimate masses and liquid volumes?
MCC3.MD.2
Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

Essential Question:
How can we use the four operations to measure and estimate masses and liquid volumes?
What is a better estimate for the weight of a bag of apples, and why?

Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
Which is a better estimate for the weight of a butterfly, and why?

a) 1 kilogram
b) 1 gram
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
Which is a better estimate for the weight of 2 loaves of bread, and why?

a) 1 kilogram
b) 1 gram
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
A baby carrot has a mass of about 10 grams. What is the mass of two baby carrots?
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
A baby carrot has a mass of about 10 g.
What is the mass of nine baby carrots?
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
A rock weighs 2 kilograms (kg). How many grams (g) is that?
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
A dictionary weighs 1 kilogram (kg).
How much would 3 dictionaries weigh?
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
A bag of cat food weighs 3 kg.
How much would 6 bags weigh?
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
A pack of Pokemon cards weighs about 13 grams. If you have 1 pack, and a friend gives you two more packs, how much would they weigh all together?
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
If one Pokemon card has a mass of about 2 g, what is the mass of 5 cards?
If the mass of one tiger is 200 kg, what is the total mass of 4 tigers?
A bag of potatoes weighs 5 kg. If a restaurant buys 13 bags, what is the total mass of potatoes purchased?
3 friends each have 425 g of candy. How much do they have all together?
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
A rock weighs 9 kilograms (kg).
How many grams (g) does it weigh?
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
A large toy weighs 6,000 grams. How many kilograms is that?
Mini Lesson
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
MCC3.MD.2
Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.
Santa has 20 grams of coal to give to 5 sisters. If they get the same amount, how many grams will each receive?
Mini Lesson
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
MCC3.MD.2
Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.
The mass of an apple is 612 grams. If a plum's mass 109 grams less, what is the mass of the plum?
Mini Lesson
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
MCC3.MD.2
Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.
A log weighs 465 kg. A woman chops off 97 kg. How much does the log weigh now?
Work Period or Additional Guided Practice
Continue guided practice in the space below, or begin independent work period.
1,000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)

1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
MCC3.MD.2
Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.
Sticky Note Check for Understanding:

Write your name on a sticky note, then answer the question. Place the note in the circle.
Bottle Cap = 2 g
Hand Sanitizer = 110 g
Continue to estimate the mass and weigh objects around the room in
grams
.
What is a

liquid
?
MCC3.MD.2
Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

Essential Question: • How can we measure and estimate liquid volumes?
Liquid

(noun):
neither a solid, nor a gas
Water is the most common
liquid

on earth.
What

is

volume
?
Wordsplash Warm-Up: Write students' responses in the space below.
Liquid volume

(noun):


Wilfrid measured the
liquid

volume

of juice in the carton.
The standard unit for measuring
liquid volume

is the
liter
.
1 liter
(L)
=

1,000

milliliters
(mL)
How do we measure
liquid volume
with a graduated cylinder

or beaker?
Direct Instruction: Model how to use a graduated cylinder and/or beaker.
Let's estimate and measure the volume of liquids in
milliliters (mL)
.
Work Period: Students estimate and measure liquid volume in milliliters.
Name Date
Milliliters (mL)
20 drops of water = 1 mL
MCC3.MD.2
Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

Essential Question: How can we use the four operations to measure and estimate masses and liquid volumes?
1 teaspoon of juice = 1 mL
1 can of soup = 330 mL
Let's estimate and measure the volume of liquids in
liters (L)
.
Work Period: Students estimate and measure, or research liquid volume in liters.
Name Date
Milliliters (mL)
20 drops of water = 1 mL
MCC3.MD.2
Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

Essential Question: How can we use the four operations to measure and estimate masses and liquid volumes?
1 teaspoon of juice = 1 mL
1 can of soup = 330 mL
Liters (L)
small pitcher of lemonade = 1 L
bath tub of water = 200 L
kitchen sink = 25 L
Closing:
Create a classroom anchor chart that displays everyone's benchmarks.
Liquid Volume Benchmarks
Milliliters (mL)
Liters (L)
teaspoon of juice = 1 mL
1 small pitcher of lemonade = 1 L
MCC3.MD.2
Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

Essential Question: How can we use the four operations to measure and estimate masses and liquid volumes?
Illustrate the Vocabulary Warm-Up
A student selects a content-specific term from a list, then illustrates it within a designated space.
Once finished, the illustrator chooses members of the class to try and determine the vocabulary word.
Students must defend their decision by explaining how and why the drawing represents a certain word.
Vocabulary:
Illustrate the Vocabulary Warm-Up
A student selects a content-specific term from a list, then illustrates it within a designated space. Once finished, the illustrator chooses members of the class to try and determine the vocabulary word. Students must defend their decision by explaining how and why the drawing represents a certain word.
liter
milliliter
graduated cylinder
volume
liquid
beaker
estimate
measure
Illustration Space
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems.
1 liter (L) = 1,000 milliliters (mL)

1,000 milliliters (mL) = 1 liter (L)
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems.
1 liter (L) = 1,000 milliliters (mL)

1,000 milliliters (mL) = 1 liter (L)
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems.
1 liter (L) = 1,000 milliliters (mL)

1,000 milliliters (mL) = 1 liter (L)
Use the space below to model how to estimate, add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems.
1 liter (L) = 1,000 milliliters (mL)

1,000 milliliters (mL) = 1 liter (L)
Reading a Graduated Cylinder
1. Make sure it's on a flat surface.

2. Lower your head to see the liquid from eye level.

3. Read from the bottom of the meniscus.
40 mL
Reading a Graduated Cylinder
1. Make sure it's on a flat surface.

2. Lower your head to see the liquid from eye level.

3. Read from the bottom of the meniscus.
25 mL
Reading a Graduated Cylinder
1. Make sure it's on a flat surface.

2. Lower your head to see the liquid from eye level.

3. Read from the bottom of the meniscus.
15 mL
*Look carefully at the scale. It can count by one, five, ten, fifty, or even one hundred.
Reading a Graduated Cylinder
1. Make sure it's on a flat surface.

2. Lower your head to see the liquid from eye level.

3. Read from the bottom of the meniscus.
37 mL
*The meniscus often lies between two numbers, so count up from the bottom number (35, 36, 37).
Reading a Graduated Cylinder
1. Make sure it's on a flat surface.

2. Lower your head to see the liquid from eye level.

3. Read from the bottom of the meniscus.
8 mL
*The meniscus often lies between two numbers, so count up from the bottom number (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8).
Early Finisher Activity
Click the links below for interactive practice reading graduated cylinders.
http://www.teachingmeasures.co.uk/menu.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/game/ma23capa-game-taking-measures-capacity
Read the graduated cylinder.

Write your name
on a sticky note,
then complete
the problem.
Place the note
in the circle.
measure, estimate, unit, mass, gram
1,000
grams
= 1
kilogram
Calibrate the interactive whiteboard.
Each time you click on a spot, count by 100's (grams).
When you get to 1,000 grams say
"are equal to 1 kilogram!"
Show the students the measurement tools and resources
for the week to stimulate interest in the unit. :)
Measurement Resource Table
Direct Instruction:
Model how to use a scale using paperclips and gram weights.
Optional: Begin
*Choose at least 3.
MATH STATIONS
Math Station #1
Estimate
Actual
Object
Use the student recording sheet,
"How Many Grams?"
Check for Understanding:
Sticky Note
Math Stations
Math Station #2

Students place heading cards
"Grams" and Kilograms" on the table.
They pla the sorting cards face down in one pile between them. Students take turns picking a card from the pile and placing it under the correct heading. After the game is finished, students record their answers onto the provided recording sheet.
http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Metric-Mass-Sorting-Grams-and-Kilograms-650333
Math Stations
Math Station #3
"Play a Weigh"
Interactive online game
Students take turns to match the measurements of objects in grams to the correct scale as they race to stop the timer as quickly as possible.
http://www.teachingmeasures.co.uk/mass/stopgame/dMASSy2.html
Click here to play on interactive whiteboard.
To return to this PREZI, just exit out of the game.
Real World
Measuring is so important in everyday life. Chefs, cooks, and bakers all need to know the exact measurements for recipes to make the food taste delicious. When you go to send a letter or small package in the mail, the postal worker will measure it in grams to tell you how much it will cost to ship.

Future Learning
This week we will continue to learn different ways in how to measure mass as well as liquid volume. Sometimes things are very heavy and it would take a huge number to record it in grams. We will learn more about this later on in the week! We will also learn about different units we can use to measure liquids.

HOMEWORK!!!
Tomorrow we will be doing a special activity measuring the sugar in our snack foods or drinks! For homework, I want you to bring in a food that you want to find out the amount of sugar.
Examples: fruit drinks, sodas, fruit roll-ups, candy bars, skittles, etc.
a) 4 kilograms
b) 4 grams
Direct Instruction / Guided Practice
Direct Instruction / Guided Practice
Direct Instruction / Guided Practice
Direct Instruction / Guided Practice
Direct Instruction / Guided Practice
Direct Instruction / Guided Practice
Direct Instruction / Guided Practice
•Review Rules, Attention Getter, and Punch Card Incentives

*End of week reward hint - it has to do with measuring amounts of ice cream and drinks at the end of the week.

**Recalibrate- skip count by 100s (grams!)
1,000 grams is equal to 1 kilogram.

Measurement discovery table:
***Today the measurement table has several snack items and drinks with display cards showing how many grams of sugar are in each of the snacks.
• Hold up a large paper clip and explain that it weighs about one gram.
• Pass some large paper clips around to the students
so that they can get an idea of how heavy a gram feels.



Direct Instruction
“Worth the Weight” (pt. 1 grams)
Students will find five objects they think should be weighed using grams without any prior measuring.

•For each item on their chart, students should hold the item to estimate its weight, measure its weight using a spring scale, then write down the actual weight of each item.

• When students are finished, hold a class discussion about what objects are appropriate to weigh in grams and what students learned from this part of the task.


Assessment
Essential Question
• How can we measure and estimate mass?

Real world connection
• Measuring is so important in everyday life! When people go grocery shopping, some items are priced by weight. If I want to know how much I will need to pay and see if I have enough money to pay the bill, I will need to be able to measure!

Connection to future learning
• Tomorrow we will continue to learn different ways in how to measure mass in kilograms. Sometimes things are very heavy and it would take a huge number to record it in grams. Later on in the week, we will learn about different units that we can use to measure liquids!

Whole Group
• The class will be measuring out the amount of sugar in grams that are in various snack foods and drinks.

The sugar will be placed in baggies and weighed for accurate measurements. We will add the baggies of sugar to the measurement display table for the week.

•Each group of six students will have a different set of snacks and drinks to work with so there will not be duplicate sugar baggy samples among the class.

Review
Games for Interactive Whiteboard
http://smartmeasurement.wikispaces.com/Weight
http://www.teachingmeasures.co.uk/mass/stopgame/dMASSy2.html

A textbook weighs 2 kilograms (kg). How many grams (g) is that?
Involve the class in a discussion about what might be appropriate to measure in grams.
Students will list items in the classroom they think they could weigh using grams. List answers on the board.
LESSON 4
Review Key Concepts and LOTS
http://www.mathsisfun.com/measure/metric-mass.html
•Review Rules, Attention Getter, and Punch Card Incentives

*End of week reward hint - party treat

* Measurement discovery table:

Guided Practice : “Make a Kilogram”
Work in pairs to fill a bag with items trying to make a kilogram.
•Do not use the scale to create your bag.
You will not weigh the bag until you have agreed that you have around a kilogram first.
• You will empty and refill their bags at least three times,
to determine if bag weighs more than, less than, or equal to one kilogram.
•Record results in the provided chart.

Assessment:
• “Worth the Weight” (pt.2 kilograms) -
Go on a scavenger hunt for items to be measured in kilograms.

Experiment with kilogram reference weights
to select objects to weigh,
estimate their weight,
and then use a spring scale
to determine the actual weight.


Then record whether the object is more than,
less than, or equal to a kilogram.

• Students will play against each other competing for the most points in two fun online games played on the interactive whiteboard.

• “Measuring Boxes”
http://www.iboard.co.uk/activity/Measuring-Boxes-Make-1kg-260

"Mostly Postie”
http://www.ictgames.com/mostlyPostie.html

• Teams send up one member of their team for each new turn on the game. If you get the measurement right, your team gets 100 points.
If you do not get it right, the other team has a chance to steal the points
if they can measure it correctly.

Whole Group
Today the measurement table has several reference weights for kilograms a 1 liter bottle.
Pass around the reference weights to get an understanding of a kg.
Grams and Kilograms
Essential Question
• How can we measure and estimate mass?

~• How are grams and kilograms related? ~

Real world connection
• Measuring is so important in everyday life! We cannot measure bigger things in grams, so the heavier things like people or animals we measure in kilograms. One example in real life is when we go for a check-up. Doctors weigh us each visit and use this information to make sure we are growing healthy and strong each time they measure you!

Connection to future learning
• • There are so many ways that we can measure mass. In the future you will learn even more exact metric measurements! It all has to do with multiplication and dividing by 10! So keep practicing those facts!!! Tomorrow we will learn about different units
that we can use to measure liquids!

Review
•Review Rules, Attention Getter, and Punch Card Incentives

*End of week reward reveal~no more hints needed!
We will be having a class party tomorrow for
all those who have earned at least 7 punches in their punch card.
We will enjoy punch and a special treat!

Pay close attention today for extra chances
to earn more punches on your punch card if you need more!
Wordsplash Warm-Up: Write students' responses in the space below.
Watch this clip of children
showing capacity of
common items from everyday life with liters and milliliters.
LIQUID VOLUME
Explore the containers on the Measurement Table
What holds about a liter, less than a liter, more than a liter?
• Small groups of students are given
empty containers of various shapes and sizes, measuring jugs, and a water tray.

Students sort containers into three groups:
those they predict hold less than 1 liter,
those that hold about 1 liter,
and those that hold more than 1 liter.

Students check predictions by measuring the capacity of each container
by filling each container with water
and then emptying the water into a measuring container
using metric units of liter or milliliters.

• Students now are to put each container in correct order from least to greatest capacity.

Guided Practice
Which is the better estimate for a bottle of your favorite salad dressing, and why?

a) 236 liters
b) 236 milliliters
Jackson wants to help at home, so he decides to mop the floor.
About how much water does he have in his bucket? How do you know?

a) 12 liters
b) 12 milliliters
Rikhia took one sip of the medicine, then spit it out all over the table. About how much medicine did she have to wipe up, and how do you know?

a) 2 liters
b) 2 milliliters
If one teaspoon equals 5 mL,
then how many mL are there in ten teaspoons? How do you know?
Whole Group
•Scoot is a fun review game of Liquid Volumes and Masses
On each student desk is a numbered scoot card..

Start at your own seat and answer the problem and record the answer on the matching number of the scoot card.

After you have recorded your answer, scoot to an open desk for another scoot card.

(repeat until you have all the scoot cards finished!)

SCOOT
Groups of students are given a large container to estimate
how much liquid it would take to fill the container to one liter.

Using a funnel, students fill the container with water
until they think they have reached one liter.

Now students check their predictions by pouring the liquid
from the container into the graduated cylinder to measure.

Students record their estimations and findings
along with answer discussion questions on the recording sheet.

Assessment
• “Fill it up”
Sticky Note
Check for Understanding:

Essential Question-• • How can we measure and estimate liquid volumes?


Review questions from the bottom of the assessment student recording sheet.
o
When estimating liquid capacity, what do you need to consider?

o
About how much liquid is there in a liter?

o
What other containers have you seen in your everyday life
that has a capacity of one liter?

o
Does the shape of the container change the amount of liquid it can hold?
Why or why not?

Real world connection
• Next time you go through the lunch line, I want you to check out your milk or juice cartons to find out how many milliliters your carton holds!

Another fun thing to do is to go home today after school and ask your family permission to look through your refrigerator to find out the capacity of other containers! Or you could help them grocery shop and seem so very smart by asking how many milliliters or liters of milk or water they would like to get.

Connection to future learning
Tomorrow we will put your knowledge of measuring liquid volume
to good use so that you guys can make our party punch!
We will be measuring out liters of sherbet and sprite to make a delicious treat!
Review Rules, Attention Getter, and Punch Card Incentives

*Today is the class party for all those who have earned at least 7 punches in their punch card. We will enjoy punch and a special treat!

Pay close attention today for extra chances
to earn more punches on your punch card if you need more!
LESSON 5
“More Punch Please”
Guided Practice
Class Party

Determine the amount of punch needed for a class party by measuring out the correct liquid volume.

**Follow the directions on the “More Punch Please” recording sheet to make the punch.

• The teacher will pass out the treat once you have made the punch.

•While you enjoy the punch and treat, work together to answer the questions on the back to rewrite the recipe for 30 students.

Review
Hand back scoot recording sheets to review questions from the previous day’s scoot game.
Address common mistakes and misconceptions.
Answer any student’s questions about a missed problem.
Essential Question
• How can we measure and estimate masses and liquid volumes?

Real world connection
• We have had so much fun this week measuring mass and liquid volume. This knowledge is so important because everywhere we go; we need to know how to measure! Grocery shopping, making recipes, giving medicine, weighing people and things. These are all essential to our lives.

Connection to future learning
As you continue on in school, you will learn even more ways to measure mass and liquid volume. There are two systems called metric (that we have been exploring this week) and customary. There are many ways to get even more exact measurements so that you will be super smarties!

Post assessment
Liquid Volume and Mass Test
If you finish early,
you may silently read a book from the measurement center.
Put your NAME on the test!!! Complete front and back. Show all work. Double check your work before you turn in your paper!

http://www. youtube.com/watch?v=6q98k4ybJKw
https://www. youtube.com/watch?v=p3WplGVyxJk
Full transcript