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CRP Theory of Change

Prepared by Michelle Guertin, Senior Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Specialist, CIMMYT
by

Michelle Guertin

on 18 June 2015

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Transcript of CRP Theory of Change

ToC
Seed Systems
ToC
Novel Diversity & Tools
ToC
Sustainable Intensification
ToC
Enhancing Impacts
ToC
Breeding
Accountability
Responds to CGIAR Phase II requirements
Strategy
Supports development of CRP WHEAT and MAIZE’s research strategy

Planning, Reporting and Seeking Funding
For both CRP and projects
Solid/compelling project proposal
Stronger reporting of results

Theory of Change


Positive and negative, primary and secondary long term effects resulting from a chain of events to which research has contributed, directly or indirectly, intended or unintended

Theory of Change
(ToC)

Presents a hypothetical identification of the ways by which
change is expected to occur
from
output to outcome and impact along an impact pathway

Questions the assumptions
about causality underlying the relationships between outputs, outcomes and impact -
assumptions present the mechanisms of change

In research it is often used as a
framework for testing hypotheses
and incrementally
building up the evidence base
for the assumptions

Developed with a
participatory approach



Intended or unintended short-term and medium-term effects resulting from an intervention’s outputs

Statements about how and why we expect a set of outcomes to come about
Explain the contextual underpinnings of the theory
Beliefs and values for each step of the change process
Internal and external risks with the potential to undermine success



The products, new knowledge and services which result from research, capacity building and other activities related to research for development

Results Strategy
Performance Measurement Strategy
Evaluation Strategy
Learning Strategy
Reporting Strategy
Impacts
Outcomes
Outputs
Assumptions
Risks
Impacts
Outcomes
Outputs
Assumptions
Risks
Ingredients of Theories of Change
Novel Diversity
& Tools
Breeding
Seed Systems
Sustainable Intensification
Enhancing Impacts
Flagship Projects
CRP - Maize & WHEAT
Why ?
CGIAR
Research Program
Theory of Change
CRP MAIZE

Sustainable Development Goals
1. End poverty
2. End hunger
3. Ensure healthy lives
4. Ensure education
5. Achieve gender equality
6. Ensure availability of water and sanitation
7. Ensure access to energy
8. Promote economic growth and work for all
9. Build resilient infrastructure
10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
11. Make cities safe and sustainable
12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production
13. Take action to combat climate change
14. Conserve oceans and marine life
15. Protect and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems
16. Promote peaceful, inclusive societies for sustainable development
17. Strengthen global partnership
CGIAR
Strategy and Results
Framework
2016- 2030
Vision
A world free of poverty, hunger and environmental degradation
Beneficiaries
Producer groups
Smallholder farmers, agro-pastoralists, pastoralists, forest users, fisher folk
Poor consumers
Both rural and urban, particularly target women and children in the poorest households
Social groups
Women and young people and producers who are marginalized or excluded from mainstream development
Processors and traders
Who add value along the chain; from producer to consumer
Geographic Focus
Currently
Africa (over 50% of investments)
Asia (about 30% of investments)
Hotspots in Latin America (about 20% of investments)
Reflects
Political commitment of CGIAR donors
Demographics of food and nutrition security
Projected impact of climate change
Research capacity of beneficiary countries
CGIAR will be responsive
Adapt investment in light of change needs

Goals
(aka System-level
Outcomes)
Reduce Poverty
Improve food & nutrition security for health
Improve natural resource systems & ecosystem services

Results Framework
Mission
To advance agri-food science & innovation to enable poor people, especially poor women, to
increase agricultural productivity
,
share in economic growth
,
feed themselves & their families better
& conserve natural resources
in the face of climate change
& other threats

Cross Cutting
Issues
Speaking the same Language
Outputs
Immediate Outcomes
Intermediate
Outcomes
Impacts
Research Outcomes
System-level
Outcomes
(SLOs)
What demonstrates you have done an activity
Outputs
What happens as a result of what you have done
What happens next
Why are we doing this
Results-based Management Terms
Intermediate
Development
Outcomes
(IDOs)
Reduced
Poverty
Improved food and nutrition security for health
Improved natural resource systems and ecosystem services
Increased resilience of the poor to climate change and other shocks

Sub-IDO
Reduced production risk
Increased income and employment

Sub-IDOs
Increased value capture by producers
More efficient use of inputs
Increased productivity

Sub-IDOs
Reduced pre- & post-harvest losses
Closed yield gaps
Enhanced genetic gain
Increased conservation & use of genetic resources
Improved diets for poor and vulnerable people

Sub-IDO
Increased availability of diverse nutrient-rich foods
Enhanced benefits from ecosystem goods and services

Sub-IDO
Agricultural systems diversified and intensified in ways that protect soils and water
SLOs
IDOs
Sub-IDOs
Cross
Cutting
Issues
Mitigation and Adaptation Achieved

Sub-IDO
Enhanced capacity to deal with climatic risks and extremes
Equity and inclusion achieved

Sub-IDOs
Technologies that reduce women’s labor & energy expenditure developed & disseminated
Improved capacity of women & young people to participate in decision-making
Enabling environment improved

Sub-IDO
Increased capacity of beneficiaries to adopt research outputs
National partners & beneficiaries enabled

Sub-IDOs
Enhanced institutional capacity of partner research organizations
Increased capacity for innovation in partner research organizations
Prepared by Michelle Guertin, Senior ME&L Specialist, CIMMYT
REsults-Based Management Framework
CRP ToC
Flagship Project ToCs
Indicators (outcomes & assumptions)
Data collection plan
Rolling evaluation plan, including impact assessments & other studies
Plan for reporting
Plan for implementation of mechanisms to learn from M&E
Purposes of Theories of Changes
Results Framework
Builds a strong business case
ME&L - Integral part of a program/project
Climate Change
Gender & Youth
Policies & Institutions
Capacity Development
Novel Diversity & Tools
Breeding
Seed Systems
Sustainable
Intensification
CGIAR Phase II
R&D
Outcomes
Main ReCommendations
from ToC Workshops

Inter-FP Collaboration
Approach for improving collaboration and sharing of information
Clear and agreed definitions of key terms
Management of Risks
Collection of information on new emerging pests, diseases & climate change impacts
Risk assessment & cost-benefit analysis of high risk research
Fundraising
Long-term strategy
Donor priority analysis
Potential cost-recovery mechanisms
New donors
Marketing
Long-term strategy
Marketing measures to increase our ability to identify, anticipate and satisfy users of CRP products
Partnerships
Needs assessments of partners and beneficiaries
Capacity assessments of partners
Policy for partnering with private sector
Enhancing
impacts
What do all these businesses have in common?
Globally Recognized

Innovative

Successful
How did they get to be so successful?
The Answer:
Business Strategy
Clear vision, mission and goals and objectives
“If you don’t know where you are going, you will likely end up somewhere else”
Yogi Berra
Business strategy
Long-term Action Plan

Management's Game Plan
Same is true for CRPs
To be successful, we also need a roadmap

But how?
Developed in a
participatory approach

Teams get clear, engaged and aligned
Developed in 4 Steps

Identify the long-term impact
Map backwards the storyline
Identify interventions and outputs
Note assumptions and risks
“If I could, I would always work in silence and obscurity, and let my efforts be known by their results ”

Emily Bronte
“An organization’s ability to learn, and translate that learning into action rapidly, is the ultimate competitive advantage”

Jack Welch
“Superhuman effort isn’t worth a damn unless it achieves results”

Ernest Shackleton
In order to strive to be as successful as
Theories of Change = Roadmap

Builds strong ownership
Create alignment across the organization
Manage for results
Learn as an organization
Full transcript