Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Bird Came Down the Walk

Ap Lit
by

Calla Bartlett

on 18 April 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Bird Came Down the Walk

The Bird Came Down the Walk... By: Emily Dickinson Paraphrase: A bird flew down the the sidewalk
He didn't know he was being watched
He ate a worm in half
And ate the rest of it raw

He then took a drink
From a piece of grass
Then jumped sideways to a wall
So a beetle could walk by

He looked back and forth
At everything that rushed by
They looked like scared beads, I assume
He moved his soft head

He was watchful, guarded
I offered him some food
He opened his wings
And flew home

Oars divided the ocean
It was too pretty to be broken
Butterflies off of banks of sunlight
Swim without splashing in the water Theme: Subject: An everyday life event can explain the beauty of nature and show how much animals and humans are alike. Conflict: The unyielding mystery of life and nature. Tone: Irony: Ironic Point of View: Level of Diction: Allusions: Word Order: Connotation: Symbols: Imagery: Visual: Auditory: Tactile: Olfactory: Gustatory: Figurative Language: Metaphors: Similes: Personification: Figurative Language: Overstatement: Understatement: Figurative Language: Metonymy: Synecodoche: Paradox: Pun: Onomatopoeia: Rhyme: Slant Rhyme: Rhythm: Caesure Form: Closed Form Quatrain: Our Creative Take: cl cl In the Garden

A bird came down the walk:
He did not know I saw;
He bit an angle-worm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw.

And then he drank a dew
From a convenient grass,
And then hopped sidewise to the wall
To let a beetle pass.

He glanced with rapid eyes
That hurried all abroad,
They looked like frightened beads, I thought;
He stirred his velvet head

Like one in danger; cautious,
I offered him a crumb,
And he unrolled his feathers
And rowed him softer home

Than oars divide the ocean,
Too silver for a seam,
Or butterflies, off banks of noon,
Leap, plashless as they swim. Dickinson creates a vivid image in this poem by using a simplistic
level of diction. For example Dickinson writes,
" And he unrolled his feathers
And rowed him softer home" Begins as a dullness, shifts to an "eerie awe" (Irony of Darwinism) 1) Darwinism 1) A human being who believes that she/he is better than the bird. 2) Raw "He did not know I saw" "Ate the fellow raw" "Drank a dew" "His velvet head" "Leap splashless as they swim" First two stanzas, before introduction of humans Forced Rhyme: After human interaction, third stanza Iambic Trimeter Rhyme Scheme: ABCB Third line of stanza is Iambic Tetrameter Except fourth stanza=Shift "and he unrolled his feathers" Our take on
The bird came down the walk Nature vs. Society Speaker: The speaker is a human observing a bird in nature Title:
He did not know I saw;
He bit an angle-worm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw." A bird came down the walk Audience: Lyric A broad audience that involves the whole human race. "He glanced with rapid eyes" "They looked like frightened beads" All Five Stanza's Syllabic Verse: 6-7 syllables -"They looked like
frightened beads" -"And then he drank a Dew
From a convenient Grass" Grass=Glass -"And he unrolled his feathers
And rowed him softer home
Than oars divide the ocean" Unrolled his feather's=Sails -"He Stirred his
Velvet head" None found When I read it myself
or when I searched
online -CL N/A Notice the shift?
What factor is different?
How do the the words change? He glanced with rapid eyes
That hurried all abroad,
They looked like frightened beads, I thought;
He stirred his velvet head

Like one in danger; cautious,
I offered him a crumb,
And he unrolled his feathers
And rowed him softer home First Response: There are no thoughts or feelings in this poem, only actions Denotation: 1)The good and evil of nature
2) Societies impact Flight of the bird is much softer than a boat rowing in the ocean
splahless vs. plashless Second Response: Nature is raw and dangerous
and the bird is doing what it needs to survive. A bird came down the walk:
He did not know I saw;
He bit an angle-worm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw.

And then he drank a dew
From a convenient grass,
And then hopped sidewise to the wall
To let a beetle pass. He glanced with rapid eyes
That hurried all abroad,--
They looked like frightened beads, I thought;
He stirred his velvet head

Like one in danger; cautious,
I offered him a crumb,
And he unrolled his feathers
And rowed him softer home

Than oars divide the ocean,
Too silver for a seam,
Or butterflies, off banks of noon,
Leap, splashless, as they swim. How does the shift affect the rhyme? Humanity vs. Nature Than oars divide the ocean Poem as a whole alluding to: Creating a lesson Shocking red Purity Connection to your "roots" Truth Is there a path? none The End (:
Full transcript