Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Animal Farm Literary Terms

No description
by

Eilidh McK

on 14 February 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Animal Farm Literary Terms

Characterization The way a character is described, either directly or indirectly

Real World Example: Jennifer is a very athletic girl

Book Example: Boxer is an extremely loyal horse who helps in the success of Animal Farm Conflict Animal Farm Literary Terms
Chapters 1 and 2 To come into disagreement or opposition, either internal or external
External: Man vs. Man, Man vs. Nature, Man vs. Society
Internal: Man vs. Self

Real World Examples: In 2008, Hurricane Ike hit Galveston and caused awful destruction to many people’s homes. (External-Man vs. Nature)

When faced with the option of moving to London, Rachel couldn’t decide if she should stay with her friends and family or move to experience everything London had to offer. (Internal-Man vs. Self)

Book Example: In the Battle of Cowshed, the animals fought off the farmers to keep their new found freedom. (External-Man vs. Man)

Following the rebellion, Mollie wanted the new freedoms of
Animalism but wanted to keep the comforts from her old life too.
(Internal-Man vs. Self) Parody A humorous or satirical imitation

Real World Examples: Several television shows such as Saturday Night Live, mock many popular ideas or events. Examples include popular movies or political situations.

Book Example: The speech that was given by Old Major, the Rebellion, and the “Pig takeover” are all examples of a parody in the book. They all over exaggerate real instances during the Communistic period in Russia. Fable A short story that contains a moral, animals with human characteristics usually serve as characters

Real World/Other Book Examples: The Tortoise and the Hare is an example of a fable because it contains animal characters and has a universal moral.

Book Example: The moral behind Animal Farm is that no one society can have all equals. This begins to reign true at the end of Chapter 2 when the pigs begin to take in power. Irony The contrast between something that is expected to happen and what actually happens

Dramatic: The reader knows something that the characters do not
Situational: When an action is intended to do something but the opposite occurs
Verbal: When a character says something but means the opposite

Real World Examples: After failing a quiz, John tells everyone that he will do well on the test. (Verbal)

Book Example: The pigs begin to take over the farm. (Dramatic) Rhetoric Book Example: Squealer states that the pigs must consume the apples and other items because it will keep the pigs healthy and Mr. Jones will not return. Caricature Exaggeration of dominant features or antics

Real World Examples: Over the summer, my uncle paid to have a caricature done of himself. When he received his picture back, he realized his larger sized nosed was drawn to take up most of his face.

Book Example: During Old Major’s speech about rebellion, he goes over the top trying to stress the importance of unity and freedom. (Since this speech is supposed to represent something Karl Marx would have said, it was greatly dramatized) Allegory An extended metaphor that often has a moral or lesson
Commonly found in literature

Real World/Other Book Examples: Ernest Hemmingway's book, the Old Man and the Sea, is an example of an allegory. Various things throughout the book are metaphors for natural and spiritual happenings.

Book Example: The book itself is an allegory to the Russian Communism.
Examples within the book include:
-Old Major as Karl Marx -Napoleon as Joseph Stalin
-Snowball as Leon Trotsky -Farmer Jones as the Russian Czar The art of persuasive speaking or writing Real World Examples: Many advertisers use rhetoric in commercials in order to sell their products.
Full transcript