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Vampires Myth or Legends

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by

Stephanie Cassel

on 5 December 2012

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Transcript of Vampires Myth or Legends

How has the myth evolved? Vampires!! Not Him!! Someone like him Let's take a look through history The Persians were one of the first to
have tales of blood drinking demons. This is Jake he was
a friend I knew in
high school.
Jake is convinced that
he's a psychic vampire. The tale of vampires has shown up in many countries. Mesopotamians, Hebrews, Ancient Greeks, and Romans were said to believe in certain demons that were the precursors to the modern vampire. In ancient times "vampire" wasn't the term used.
The devil was considered synonymous with the vampire.
There are stories of families disinterring loved ones by removing their hearts. Psychic vampirism are considered consumers
of energy rather than blood. They hang around
"host" who they view to have a lot of energy.
They can be anybody. Most who believe they are
vampires tend to join cults. When he told me this I took interest
and did some research. One of the earliest recordings of vampire activity
came from the region of Istria in modren Croatia
in 1672. Local reports cited the local vampire Giure
Grando of the village Khring near Tinjan as the
cause of panic among the villagers. A former peasant
Guire died in 1656, however, local villagers
claimed he returned from the dead and began drinking blood from people and sexually harassing his widow.
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