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The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

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by

Shauna Thompson

on 30 September 2015

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Transcript of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

Suspense
Sense of anticipation or worry that the author makes the reader feel
Flashbacks
Seen in reveries, remembrances, dreams, etc.

May refer to the scene itself or to its presentation


Flashbacks
Example: The television show "Lost" incorporates multiple flashbacks in nearly every episode to provide characters' backstories and shed light on their motivations, secrets, and connections with other characters.
Another type of flashback
A flashback to a scene earlier in the story

These flashbacks help a character realize or recognize a significance of an image, person, idea, etc.


What does flashback have anything to do with suspense?
Most of the time, flashback leads to suspense. When a character remembers back to a specific event, the suspense is the feeling the reader gets when waiting for the character to find the connection, realization, or recognition of the flashback's significance.
Suspense
Example:
When your favorite TV show ends, and you want to know what happens next. This effect of suspense is done correctly in this case. The author or production designer leaves the audience/reader wanting more.

Suspense and Flashbacks in The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
Flashbacks
a scene that interrupts the present action of a narrative work to depict an earlier event that usually occurs before the opening scene
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