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History of Diversity

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by

Jeremy Hayward

on 8 November 2013

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Transcript of History of Diversity

Fouls, goals, penalties
Sport, competition, nationality
Religious exemption
Metic inclusion
federalism
Military/public service
Education policy
Naturalisation policy
Symbols, holiday
multiculturalism
Language
Minority right claims
Kymlicka (2002)
Nation building policies
1960s
..Would remind parents of their new obligations in Britain
...
it is essential to teach these children basic British customs, basic British habits, and if one likes, basic British prejudices... (Tomlinson 2008:27)
1960s
££££ Section 11 funding for
additional English
white flight,
concentrated housing
no more than 30% immigrant
Teachers with degrees
No National curriculum

Strong LEAs
Schools segregated by class
Paternalism to hostility
Moral panic
Liberal laws
The liberal hour is passing
Supplementary schooling
ESN
1970s
Immigration laws
1970s
Comprehensive
Comprehensive
Some curriculum changes
Some accommodation
lower achievement
focus on disadvantage
greater teacher awareness
Demand for faith schools
Recognition of problems faced
Temples
Bilingual teachers
Language recognition
Multicultural education
1980s
Riots
Free market
Muslim assertiveness
anti racism
Swann Report
Multicultural education
Left
Anti racist education
1988 Education Ac
t

And in the inner cities - where youngsters must have a decent education if they are to have a better future - that opportunity is all too often snatched from them by hard left education authorities and extremist teachers. Children who need to be able to count and multiply are learning anti-racist mathematics-whatever that may be.
School twinning
Head teacher training
Equality policies
Curriculum changes
Parental involvement
Teacher training
Minority teachers
majority
minority
Right
LEAs HEIs
Achievement
Key stage testing
Opt out of LEA
Parental choice
Abolition of ILEA
1990s
Iraq war
Stephen Lawrence
Immigration
1980s
And in the inner cities—where youngsters must have a decent education if they are to have a better future—that opportunity is all too often snatched from them by hard left education authorities and extremist teachers. And children who need to be able to count and multiply are learning anti-racist mathematics-whatever that may be.

...Children who need to be able to express themselves in clear English are being taught political slogans. Children who need to be taught to respect traditional moral values are being taught that they have an inalienable right to be gay.
1990s
League table
Parental choice
National curriculum
End to ME

New universities over represented
inclusion/exclusion
Some national monitoring
Busy teachers
1997-2010
Human Rights
Social Exclusion
Lawrence Inquiry
Climbie
Parekh
Equality and human rights commission
Equality Act
Mentoring
Sure start
Excellence in cities
EAZ
EMAG
Faith Schools
London Challenge
Gifted and Talented
Citizenship education
Academies
Community cohesion
PVE
Citizenship Education
More BME teachers
Recording of racist incidents
Agegbo report
League tables
Thick or thin?
Cultural reproduction
Upper class
Human rights?
2010-now
Muscular Liberalism
or
Aggressive Majoritarianism
Ofsted not to report on community cohesion
Free schools
Curriculum review/New Curriculum
Pupil Premium
Politics catching up with society
Lack of strong political leadership or vision
Much improvement but still difficult issues to address

History of education for diversity
'The responsibility for the adaptations and adjustments of settling in a new country lies entirely with those who have come to settle and raise families'

Honeyford R (1984) 1984 Education and Race and Alternative View Salisbury Review
Citizenship education
What is happening?
Work, leisure, class
Scottish
Assimilation?
Should there be schools where English is not the main language of instruction?
Census
Tomlinson S (2008) Race and Education: Policy and Politics in Britain Maidenhead:OUP
Gillborn D (2008) Racism and Education: Coincidence or Conspiracy Oxon: Routledge
Language

Hirsch E D (1983) ‘Cultural Literacy’ in American Scholar 52:2 pp159-169)

Formalism is wrong: Content is important

Core content is needed for the 'common reader'

Pupils need set knowledge or cultural literacy
Assimilation
"I'm no educationalist, but if you examine the statistics it is certainly difficult that our schools discriminate again ethnic minorities, even unwittingly. Chinese and some other Asian pupils excel, easily outperforming the whites"
Rod Liddle in Gillborn (1988:153)
Policy should be colour blind
Types of school
Support for schools
Curriculum
Integration and pluralism
Phillip's mum Jane
“My son’s journey through the education system: at the age of three, a rather sweet, ever smiling little boy, entered a world that for years would result in him experiencing rejection from many of his peers, and the reason was ignorance."

"Phillip experienced his first bullying at nursery school with taunts of "girl" and physical violence. The hurt, confusion and tears he shed were simply heartbreaking. I might add that Phillip was always taller by a year than his actual age; hence "girl" could only have been due to his gentleness. Phillip went onto primary school, where he still had to endure taunts of "girl" and some violent attacks. Phillip recalls this time as when he realised how nasty people could be. Phillip remained gentle and kind, so as a mother the pain he suffered was unbearable. By late juniors I knew my son was different, I was already thinking much about his sexuality."

"Within weeks of starting secondary school the homophobic remarks began with taunts of "queer” and “girl". Phillip suffered a physical attack resulting in a black eye. This attack resulted in Phillip too receiving a detention, and appallingly, the teacher from the class it happened in told Phillip the incident was “the highlight” of his day! Year 8 Phillip recalls as awful, the "gay" and "queer" taunts became more frequent, people regularly stole his belongings. I made sure he knew he could walk out if he couldn’t cope. During this year he was punched in the eye for not touching a picture of a vagina. As a parent I spent every day scared for his welfare. After complaints to the school I informed them any more physical attacks would be reported to the police."


"By year 9 he’d formed some good friendships that lightened his life, giving him much-needed support. Fortunately some of his friends were also gay. These friends supported him through the gay taunts. This continued until the end of year 10, during one of many verbal attacks from a group of boys, they asked "Are you f***ing queer"? Phillip replied "YES". They were shocked and said "really?" and "you are alright really". Along with smoking he became everyone's favourite gay; his peer group finally left him alone."


"During all this time I wrote letters regarding my child’s welfare to the school. They assured me they would try to help, but at no time was the homophobic intimidation challenged. Against all odds Phillip worked very hard and attained high grade GCSEs in eight subjects, he now attends college."


"Since leaving school Phillip has suffered three assaults, each time by gangs of lads out gay-bashing. Each attack resulted in hospital treatment, including stitches to repair his mouth."
"My belief is in the education of young people and adults. Homophobia must be treated as the crime it is. It is only when homophobia becomes publicly unacceptable that our children can be safe and fulfil their potential. School is where they spend much of their waking day, and where teachers can and MUST play their part. For all our children the education system must sit up and take notice! There is a lot of work to be done, together we can and must achieve it."
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