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Path Towards Peace: Analysis of Israeli-Palestinian Conflict - Progression or Regression? The Oslo Accords and Beyond

Final Project for History 390 (Fall 2012, Professor Cohen).
by

Katie Horn

on 16 December 2012

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Transcript of Path Towards Peace: Analysis of Israeli-Palestinian Conflict - Progression or Regression? The Oslo Accords and Beyond

"Oslo Accords": A Secret Path to Peace A set of peace talks that initially occurred in private,
concluding in a formal signing in Washington,
D.C on September 13th, 1993

Officials present included U.S. President Bill Clinton, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, and PLO President Yassar Arafat Oslo Accord I A New Beginning? Path of the 1990's Path Towards Peace: Major Peace Talks Between Israel & Palestine - Analysis of a Decade (1993 to 2003) Territory Lines After the 1993 Oslo Accord The following two maps depict the territory lines existent after the signing of the 1993 Oslo Accord.

The first map displays the Gaza Strip area, including an overlay image of the Israeli settlements in existence in December 1993 (represented by blue dots). Shown in red is the Armistice Line created in 1950, following the 1949 Armistice Agreements between Israel and the surrounding Arab countries.

The second map displays the West Bank area, also including an overlay image of the Israeli settlements in existence in December 1993 (represented by blue dots). Shown in red, also, is the Armistice Line created in 1950 at the 1949 Armistice Agreement. Oslo Accord II Also referred to as the Interim Agreement, Oslo Accord II was signed on September 28th, 1995 in Washington, D.C. Present were President Bill Clinton, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, and Yassar Arafat.

This agreement divided the West Bank into Area A, B, and C, based upon population of the areas and the military requirements of Israel.

Also created during this transition was the Palestinian Authority (PA), which would act as a representative of the Palestinians. Territory Lines After the 1995 Oslo Accord The following maps depict the territory lines existent after the signing of the 1995 Oslo Accord, better known as the Interim Agreement.

The first map depicts the area of the West Bank, the main territorial focus of the Interim Agreement. Unlike the territory lines drawn after the first Oslo Accord, the Interim Agreement divided the West Bank into three areas (A, B, & C). These areas are color-coded on the map. Also included on the first map are the existing Israeli settlements in 1995, represented by blue triangles.

The second map depicts the Gaza Strip area, the secondary focus of the Interim Agreement. The blue shaded areas indicate the existing Israeli settlements following the Interim Agreement. The gold shaded areas indicate the Israeli-declared security zones. Take Two: A New Millennium for Peace? The Unraveling of Oslo Camp David Summit The Camp David Summit took place in Washington, D.C. between U.S. President Bill Clinton, newly elected Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, and PA Chairman Yasser Arafat. Territory Lines After the 2000 Camp David Summit The following maps depict the proposed Jewish and Palestinian territories as discussed, but not agreed to, at the Camp David Summit.

The first map depicts the West Bank area, again the main focus of the Summit. The dark green areas represent areas proposed for long term lease by Israel, whereas the light green areas represent Palestinian localities. The dark blue areas represent areas proposed for Israeli annexation, whereas the light blue areas represent Jewish localities.

The second map depicts the Gaza Strip area, the secondary focus of the Camp David Summit. The coloration on this map follows the same legend as the previous map of the West Bank. Aid From the East: The New Millennium Continues The Arab Peace Initiative Arab Peace Initiative While the Initative started in 2002, actual progress was stalled until 2007 due to violence in the area. The major result of the Initiative was the desire to normalize relations between the two parties as well as create a Palestinian state similar to the 1967 territory lines. Territorial Desires vs. Territorial Realities The first map displayed shows the Palestinian and Israeli territories as they existed in 1967. The Palestinian territory is noted in green, while the Israeli territory is noted in white/off-white. These territorial divides represent what was desired of by the Arab Peace Initiative in return for normalization of relations between themselves and Israel.

The second map represents the existing territorial lines in 2007, when the Arab Peace Initiative's influence peaked. As can be seen, the difference between these two maps are severe, and the desired territory was not received. Mapping Out The Future: The Bush Administration The Road Map for Peace Road Map For Peace The Roadmap for Peace is the final peace talk that will be analyzed. The Roadmap was proposed by the Quartet for the Middle East (U.S, E.U, Russia, & U.N) in 2003.

The Roadmap, started under the Bush Administration, was seen as the starting point of achieving the vision of a two-state solution. Advancement Towards a Two-State Solution The following two maps are used to analyze the lack of progress made on obtaining a two-state solution.

The first map shows the territorial lines that existed in 2003, the year the Roadmap for Peace was announced by the Bush administration. The areas in beige represent the areas of Palestinian control, while the areas in green are under Israeli control.

The Second map shows the territorial lines that exist presently (2012). The areas in dark green are under Palestinian control, while the areas in gray are under Israeli control. As these maps show when compared with one another, the goal of a two-state solution has yet to be reached. An attempted continuation of the negotiations started by the Oslo Accords, the Summit ended without reaching a formal agreement. However, a Trilateral Statement was issued.
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