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What Would Happen if the Water Cycle Stopped?

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maxwell tillema

on 27 May 2016

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Transcript of What Would Happen if the Water Cycle Stopped?

What Would Happen if the Water Cycle Stopped?
The water cycle effects the whole world, from renewable power to providing drinkable water.
If it stopped, the effects would be devastating.
Disclaimer
The only way this could ever happen is if the sun disappeared and the Earth didn't freeze over or collide with another planet, so don't worry.
Energy
Many countries use hydroelectric power, which relies on flowing water.
If the water cycle stopped, every dam and waterwheel would be useless.
How important is it?
Even though all hydropower would stop, it isn't absolutely vital based on world usage.
Ecosystem Effects
The water cycle brings water to everywhere on land, and is the reason that we have rain, snow, streams, and all other kinds of precipitation. Stopping it would cause an endless drought.
What Would Happen?
Ecosystem Effects
Along with a lack of water flow, many existing water sources would lack filtering. No water flow in lakes would cause overgrowth, killing many species of fish and other lake wildlife.
Effects on Humans
Without flowing water, natural water sources would become contaminated with other species of plants, making it very hard to filter. Rainwater would also be a useless source because of the lack of precipitation.
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