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Gift and concept of time

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by

Sherilyn Chan

on 3 June 2015

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Transcript of Gift and concept of time


WELCOME TO MY HUMBLE AMERICAN HOME
JAPAN
THE LITERAL MIDDLE EAST
INAPPROPRIATE GIFTS
CHINA EXPRESS
Personal clothing items (considered too personal to be given as gifts).

Anything to do with (even gifts with just

pictures of a dog) are discouraged.
*While is discouraged, it is frequently

used in Arabic and Middle Eastern countries.

& which contain alcohol (such as certain perfumes)
or from scavengers ( ,



, etc). This includes leather

products made from pig skin or ostrich.
Gifts to avoid
Clocks
Handkerchiefs
Towels
Sharp objects
Cut flowers (Especially yellow chrysanthemums/white flowers)
Gifts in sets of 4
Shoes
Green hats
Coins and wrinkled/dirty/folded notes
(have sharp edges which symbolize severance of relationships).
& are deemed effeminate

and are discouraged from being presented to men.
, or showing the human body

(especially a nude or partially nude female body).
APPROPRIATE GIFTS
How to present the gift
When to give what
Red – Lucky
Pink/Yellow – Happiness
Gold – Fortune and Wealth
White/Black/Blue – Death
Gift wrap
PRESENTING & RECEIVING GIFTS
Use your right hand or both hands to present or receive gifts.
The left hand is never used alone as it is considered unclean.

Do not deny a gift
Avoid giving gifts to the wives of Arab colleagues.
PUNCTUALITY AND CONCEPT OF
Punctuality is not traditionally valued.

"Time is a servant, not a master."

The idea that a person should be ruled by the clock is amusing.

It's fine if a person is on time. But it's also fine if a person is late.

People could show up hours late (or not at all) without conveying an insult.

GENERAL GUIDELINES
• The emphasis in Japanese business culture is on

the ritual of , rather than the itself.

*For this reason, you may receive a gift that seems too modest, or conversely, extravagant. An expensive gift will not be perceived as a bribe.
If you receive a gift, make sure to reciprocate

It is a good policy to bring an assortment of gifts for your trip. This way, if you are unexpectedly presented with a gift, you will be able to reciprocate.
• Ensure that your gifts are wrapped. It's safest to leave this task to a store or hotel gift-wrapping service.

• The safest gift-wrapping choices are pastel-coloured papers, without bows. Avoid wrapping a gift with brightly covered papers or bows.

• Gifts in pairs are considered lucky.
GIVING & RECEIVING OF GIFTS
• A wrapped gift is often carried inside a shopping bag to avoid ostentation and minimize any hint that a gift is about to be presented.
• It is a mistake to give the same gift to two or more Japanese of unequal rank. People will also take offense if you are in the presence of a group of people and give a gift to only one person.
• Customary to say that the gift is “tsumaranai mon” [“an uninteresting or dull thing”]. Meant to convey that the relationship is more important than the 'trivial' gift.
• A gift for an individual should be given in private. If you are presenting a gift to a group of people, have all of the intended recipients assembled.

• The best time to present a gift is toward the end of your visit. You can discreetly approach the recipient, indicating that you have a small gift. Avoid giving a gift early in a relationship or at any conspicuous moment.
• Before accepting a gift, it is polite to modestly refuse at least once or twice before finally accepting.
GIFTS TO AVOID
APPRECIATED GIFTS
PUNCTUALITY
BE ON TIME!
THAT IS ALL.

Major holidays & important events
e.g. Cards, notes and flowers
Not an elaborate event except during Christmas
Seen as a sign of friendship
Believes that it eases transition into next life
When invited to someone's house, give a small gift
e.g. chocolates or flowers
Gift from a man should be said to come from him and his mother, sister or female relative
Cash: Life events
Birth, marriage, death
Given to friends, family and extended family members
Should be given in odd numbers for good luck
Gold, silver jewellery and household items: Weddings
Appropriate gifts
What not to do
Advisable not to give expensive gifts unless close
Don't give frangipanis or white flowers
Don't wrap gifts with dark colours or white
Don't give things made of leather, pig's skin or alcoholic products
Don't open gifts when received
Indians are not particular about time
Can be hours late
Gifts are normally opened on the spot
Americans expect people to be on time
Indian gift giving
Don't write on it with red ink
Use both hands
Red packets typically left unsigned
Exchange gifts in private
Be punctual!
Early = Earnest

Holidays, Birthdays, Official Business Meetings, Special events: Gifts.
Chinese New Year, Weddings: Red packets
• Present gifts with both hands.
Full transcript