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mitral valve prolapse

a circulatory disease presentation
by

will jones

on 11 October 2010

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Transcript of mitral valve prolapse

Mitral valve Prolapse most common valve abnormality affects 5% to 10% of the worlds population A normal mitral valve consists of two thin leaflets, located between the left atrium and the left ventricle of the heart. A normal Valve Description What the Disease does The disease This disease is caused by the displacement of an abnormally thickened mitral valve leaflet into the left atrium during a contraction of the heart. What causes the Disease? Two kinds of MVP 2 different kinds of mvp Classic nonclassic non severe with low risk of complications Classic MVP could result in cardiact arrest or possibly sudden death. Is not life threatening in most people. What happens? When the valve does not close securely enough the blood flows back into the left atrium. Diagnostics Mitral Valve Prolapse is diagnosed with Echocardiography Echocardiography is an ultrasound of the heart symptoms shortness of breath
chest pains
anxiety
panic attacks
depression
migrane headaches
and rarely stroke Treatment. Most patients just need reasurance but sometimes surgery is unavoidable. Recent article The article states that treatment is not usually necessary and that yearly ecocardiography exams are recommended. minor sergery remains the only way to treat it. This info came from medicinenet.com The End
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