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Pop Culture

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by

kenny alvarez

on 30 September 2014

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Transcript of Pop Culture

The Radio

1920's Pop Culture
economic prosperity
social
artistic influence
cultural dynamism

Widespread information
Kept everyone on the same page
Influenced ideas
Helped spur the econonmy
Cultural wars
Different ideas
Jobs
Free time

City Living
Country Life
Booming industry
Leisure activities
Rebellious teenagers
Set in their ways
Strong connection with religion
Economic Disadvantage
technology advancements
television
telephone
cars
1920's music
jazz
Blues
Architectural Advancements
Mansions
Compacted living
Migration to the city
Immigration
Women's Advancements
1920s
Work Cited
John Sullivan, May 1, 2003 http://xroads.virginia.edu/~ug00/3on1/radioshow/1920radio.htm
Susan J. Douglas, 1999 http://library.thinkquest.org/27629/themes/media/md20s.html
Timothy D. Taylor, 2001 http://www.academia.edu/488372/Music_and_the_Rise_of_Radio_in_1920s_America_technological_imperialism_socialization_and_the_transformation_of_intimacy
Evolving laws and
organizations
different groups had
varying motives
corresponding
laws and politics
New opportunities
expansion in education, job, opportunities, and rights
A change in customs
lawlessness
racial tensions

economic hardships
Sports
Transportation
baseball
media

Louis Armstrong
automobiles
roads and highways
airplanes


Traditionalists Vs. Modernists
Traditionalists
Modernists
People who had deep
respect for long-held
cultural and religious
values
People who embraced
new ideas, styles, and
social trends
The Divide
values
Adults &
Youths
perspectives
Science
Full transcript