Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Acts Chronology

a chronology of the life of Christ, the apostles, early church, and Roman empire
by

Andy Boucher

on 12 November 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Acts Chronology

Greek Empires
331-166 BC
Hasmoneans
135-63 BC
40 BC
50
<-BC AD->
(cc) image by jantik on Flickr
Chronology of Acts & the Apostles
Emperor Ceasar Augustus
30 BC
37 BC
-Herod the Great-
37 BC
4 BC
6-4 BC
Jesus of Nazareth
AD
27-29
Jesus born
Bethleham, Judea
6-4 bc
AD 6
Jesus is "lost" in the Temple
Emperor Tiberias
AD 14
37
Jesus begins His public ministry
AD 24-26
Jesus is crucified
Jesus ascends into heaven
Jesus raises from the dead!
Pentecost
the Church begins
Stephen is martyred
Philip's ministry in Samaria & to the Ethiopian eunuch
AD 38
41
Acts 9
Saul's conversion
James the Greater martyred
AD 45
Peter is miraculously released from prison
AD 46
James the Just writes his Epistle of James
Barnabas & Saul minister together in Antioch
Londinium (London) established
Barnabas & Paul's (Saul) 1st missionary trip
Paul writes Galatians
52
The Jerusalem Council
Paul writes
1 Thessalonians
53
Paul writes
2 Thessalonians
Paul & Silas
2nd Missionary Trip
Paul & Barnabas split
Caligula
Claudius
41
54
600's BC
Historical Intro to the New Testament
The succession of Gentile empires leading to the birth of Christ provides the historical context known in the epistles as “the fullness of time”. Each had its own contribution, both politically and socially
Babylonian Empire
626-539 BC
Persian Empire
539-331 BC
500's BC
400's BC
300's BC
200's BC
100's BC
Maccabeans
166-135 BC
AD 100's
AD 200's
AD 300's
AD 400's
Roman Empire
27 BC - AD 476

Babylonian Captivity
Babylonian Captivity
c. 590-520 BC
Religious Developments
Orthodox Judaism emerged from the captivity.
Synagogues developed because the temple was destroyed.
Idolatry ended with the captivity.
People Groups:
Jews: generally members of the tribes of Judah, Benjamin, and Levi who returned from captivity during the Persian Era led by Ezra & Nehemiah
Samaritans: Jews who were left in the land during the Assyrian & Babylonian Captivities. They intermarried with people who were placed in the land by the Assyrians. They were considered ½ breed heretics by the Jews.
Gentiles: anyone who was non-Jewish (and except Samaritans).
Cyrus conquered Babylon. He was kind and beneficent toward the Jews and permitted exiles to return to Judah. In this period reforms were led by Ezra and Nehemiah. The division between the Jews and the Samaritans developed during this period
Julius Caesar
Herod the Great
37-4 BC
Pharisees:the term “Pharisee” means “separatist”. These people were the religious purists, the traditionalists, the orthodox, and the non-conformists of the New Testament period. They were descended from Jews who had fought the Hellenistic in the days of the Maccabees. They were extremists who separated from their fellow Jews as well as from the heathen. The Pharisees were proud of their separation and even hypocritical. They were generally those who controlled the synagogues.
Sadducees:These were the religious liberals of the New Testament. They denied the authority of tradition. They distrusted any revelation later than the Pentateuch. Doctrinally, they denied the ideas of a resurrection, angels, and spirit beings (& miracles). They were Hellenistic, adopting Greek ways into Jewish culture. In the New Testament times they controlled the priesthood and the temple ministry.
Essenes:This was an ascetic sect, which had reacted to the externalism of the Pharisees and the worldliness of the Sadducees. They lived ascetic and celibate lives in communes apart from society. Their main concern was with reading and studying Scripture, prayer and ceremonial cleansings. Messiah to come to them as true Israel.
The Essenes were known for industry and piety. They were against war and slavery. The center for this sect was at a site called Qumran on the Dead Sea. A primary contribution was the preservation of the Scriptures, as witnessed by the Dead Sea Scrolls. Their purpose, as a sect, was to leave corruption and “prepare the way of the Lord.” They expected the Messiah to come to them as true Israel.
Herodians:This political group believed that the best interests of the Judeans lay in cooperation with the Romans. Their name was taken from Herod the Great who sought to Romansize Palestine.
Zealots:This also was a political group, as reactionary to the Herodians as the Pharisees were to the Sadducees. They believed, militantly, that Judea should be independent of Rome and Roman influence.
This will eventually cause the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 ad.
Jewish
Religious & Political
Groups
Alexander the Great expanded the empire and conquered Persia. Through his influence the Greek Language became the official language, lingua franca, of the known world, and Greek culture was spread throughout the empire, a process called hellenization.
After his death in 323 bc, his empire was divided between his four generals, Antigonus, Cassander, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus. Through political maneuvering and intrigue, Palestine became the point of contention between the Seleucidae and the Ptlomeies, the ruling families of Syria and Egypt
Alexander the Great expanded the empire and conquered Persia. Through his influence the Greek Language became the official language, lingua franca, of the known world, and Greek culture was spread throughout the empire, a process called hellenization
Seleuicidae—198-166 bc—period of severe persecution of the Jews. After a defeat in Egypt, Antiochus IV Epiphanies returned to Syria taking his vengeance out of the Jews, killing many, preventing religious observances, and polluting the temple by erecting a pagan alter of Olympian Zeus in it and sacrificing a pig on the alter in 168 bc. This action incited a Jewish revolt.
Scribes: Strictly speaking the scribes were members of a profession rather than a sect. They were copyists of the Law, and thus considered authorities on the subject. They were the lawyers of the New Testament. Their authority also gave them recognition as teachers of the Law. In their thinking, they were usually closer to the Pharisees than any other group.
Maccabeans—166-135 bc—the Jews revolted against Antiochus IV, lead by Judah Maccabeaus. This was a time of serious longing for a military and political Messiah. There was also continual war with Syria and civil war during this period. Simon, one of Judah’s (Mattathias’ son) three sons arranged for political freedom for the Jews, for which, in gratitude, his family was given the position of ruling high priests, known as the Hasmoneans. This wealth and power which came to the priests obscured the Davidic line by the time of the New Testament.
Hasmoneans—135-63 bc—Period was characterized by political freedom, but greed, jealousy, and intrigue. Civil disorder and military weakness resulted in a Roman takeover. During this period the Hasidim emerged, the religious conservatives who were the forerunners of the Paraisees. The Hellenizers also emerged, desiring some qualities of Greek life and downplaying Jewish distinctiveness and eventually became the Sadducees. The Sadducees were dominant among the Hasmoneans, thus explaining their concentration in Jerusalem in New Testament times
Nero
68
Galba
Otho
Vitellius
69
Vespasian
79
Titus
Domitian
81
96
Nerva
Trajan
98
117
Flight to Egypt & return
upon Herod's death
BC=Before Christ
BCE=Before Christian Era
A.D. = Anno Domini
CE=Christian or Common Era
Section of a fresco in the Niccoline Chapel by Fra Angelico, depicting Saint Peter consecrating the Seven Deacons. Saint Stephen is shown kneeling.
Acts 6
Apostles appoint deacons
4
0
Peter Baptizing the Centurion Cornelius, by Francesco Trevisani, 1709
Acts 10-11
48
Acts 13-14
Thomas is martyred
Acts 15
Acts 15-18
Paul in Corinth
18 months
Acts 18
Apollos' Temple
Location: India
Date: unknown
http://www.apostlepaulthefilm.com/paul/journey_01.htm
http://www.apostlepaulthefilm.com/paul/journey_02.htm
54
58
Paul departs on his 3rd Missionary Journey
http://www.apostlepaulthefilm.com/paul/journey_03.htm
2 years in Ephesus
Paul writes
1 Corinthians
Paul writes
2 Corinthians
Macedonia
Corinth
Paul writes
Romans
Paul arrives in Jerusalem
& is arrested
Acts 21-25
6
0
Andrew
martyred
Patras, Achaea,
The Gospel according to Matthew written
Matthew
martyred
axed to death by a halberd Nadabah, Ethiopia
The Gospel according to Luke written
Paul travels
to Rome
Paul writes to
Philemon on behalf
of Onesimus
Paul writes
the Colossians
61
62
Paul writes
Ephesians
James the Just
(Jesus' 1/2 Bro) martyred
Paul writes
Philippians
63
John Mark
writes his
Gospel (Mark)
from Rome
Luke writes
The Acts of
the Apostles
64
Paul released from jail
Paul writes
1 Timothy
&
Titus
Peter writes
1 Peter
from Rome
Nero
burns
Rome
thrown off the Temple in Jerusalem by Ananus the High Priest, then beaten with a fuller's club
Prison Epistles
http://www.apostlepaulthefilm.com/paul/journey_04.htm
65
Epistle to the
Hebrews written
67
Peter & Paul arrested
Paul is beheaded in Rome
Peter is
crucified
in Rome
Peter writes
2 Peter
Jude
(Jesus' 1/2 bro)
writes his epistle
Paul writes
2 Timothy
68
Nero dies
John Mark
martyred
in
Alexandria,
Egypt
Jerusalem destroyed
by General Titus
Colleseum begun
Jude (Jesus' 1/2 bro)
killed in Edessa
72
73
74
?
Barnabas killed
Simon the Zealot
killed in Britain
(?)
7
0
8
0
Doctor Luke
martyred near
Boeotia, Greece
Matthias martyred in Jerusalem
Bartholomew
martyred in
Armenia
John writes his gospel from Ephesus
John writes
1, 2, 3 John
from Ephesus
84
85
?
86-87
9
0
95-100
John is
unsuccessfully
boiled alive
John
is exiled
to the
Isle of Patmos
1
0
0

A.
D.
John receives
his Revelation
John dies
in Ephesus
of
natural causes
Colosseum is completed

& becomes the sight of hundreds of Christian deaths
Full transcript