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Silk Roads

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by

Brian Roberts

on 14 October 2014

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Transcript of Silk Roads

Religion
Buddhism
Buddhist Deities evolved from
other religions along the silk roads:
The image of the Buddha
orginates from India.
The majority of the people that converted to
Buddhism were merchants. This attraction led to Buddhism to be spread from India to China.
One of the first places Buddhism spread to was oasis towns. Merchants would stop at these towns between trades.
Buddhism spread to the Steppe lands of central Asia. Eventually, with the help of traders, merchants and nomadic people, Buddhism made its way to China.
Silk Roads
The Silk Roads spread over 3,000 miles.
The name of the city the Silk trade began in was Chang'an, now known as Xi'an.
The Silk Roads began during the Han dynasty (206 BCE-220 CE ).
The Silk Roads gained their name because the original purpose of the roads was the Chinese silk trade.
Items traded along silk roads:
Silk
Porcelain
Tea
Bronze
Wine
Horses
Spices
Glass
Metals
Gold
Bronze
Iron
Silver
Jade
Amber
The Silk Roads provided a method for religions to spread and develop. Among these religions were:
Steel
There were two types of trade routes connecting the east to the west. One on land (Silk Roads), the other was by sea (Maritime Trade Routes).
The land routes of the silk roads spread from China all the way to the Roman Empire.
Maritime trade routes used monsoon winds and began in the South China Sea and linked China to the east coast of India and the west coast of India to the Persian Gulf.
The Silk Roads
Manicheanism
Nestorianism
Daoism
Islam
Zoroastrianism
Hinduism
Buddha
Full transcript