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African Americans and The Great Depression

CI Powerpoint
by

Dusu Jalloh

on 12 October 2012

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Transcript of African Americans and The Great Depression

African Americans and the
Great Depression BY Zoe, Julia, Dusu The Beginning: "Black Tuesday" African American Life African Americans and the New Deal African American and the New Deal On October 29, 1929 America began to face the biggest economic crises in history. The Wall Street Stock Market crashed and millions of lives were changed forever. All the banks and businesses shut down and millions of people lost their jobs and money. Racial Violence(especially in the south)escalated from previous years after the stock market crashed. Lynchings went up from 8 in 1932 to 28 in 1933. Even when the New Deal was established and some jobs were created, African Americans were still discriminated against. Some policies, such as AAA, kicked out over 100,000 African Americans and proceeded to hire white people. Many camps, such as CCC, were segregated.
Soup kitchens that were held by profitable white civilians banned African Americans The Great Depression worsened an already bleak economy for the African Americans.
They were last to be hired and the first to be laid off.
Their unemployment rate was 2 to 3 times more than white people. Racial Violence African Americans and the New Deal FDR (Franklin Delano Roosevelt) refused to pass anti-lynching laws so lynchings increased greatly during the depression. Racial Violence Discussion Question Did the struggle for African Americans to get jobs during the Great Depression have an affect on African Americans getting jobs today?
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