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Special Occasion Speeches

Final Unit
by

Samuel Sloan

on 2 June 2016

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Transcript of Special Occasion Speeches

Final Unit
Special Occasion Speeches
The 3 Major Kinds of speeches:
Informative
Persuasive
Special Occasion
Special Occasion Speeches:
8 Main Kinds
Warms up audience for main speaker
Tells audience why upcoming speaker is qualified
Acts as a preview for their subject matter (can kids watch, is it funny, why is this person important?)
Speech of Introduction
People that typically have these:
Comedians
Politicians
Actors/Musicians
Introducing a Theater Show
Independent Artists
Given in response to receiving an award
Expresses gratitude / thanks
Can often be very stereotypical - difficult to make them stand out
Speech of Acceptance
Oscars/Grammys/Tony
Local Awards
Nobel or Pulitzer Prize
Sports, etc.
A
Toast
is a brief tribute to a person.

A
Roast
is a humorous tribute to a person.

Both are typically good-natured and ultimately come from a place of respect (what separates a roast from just being mean)
Toast/Roast
Wedding Toast
Anniversary Toast
Comedy Roast
White House Correspondence Dinner - Pres. Roast
Motivate listeners to positively consider, reflect on, and often act on the speaker's words
These are motivational or rallying speeches
Typically social (reform), personal (a coach on a sport's team), or political (focusing a political party's strategy) in nature.
Speech of Inspiration
Speeches during the civil rights movement (MLK Jr., Malcolm X)
Speeches during wartime or the depression
State of the Union (sometimes)
The song "Always Wear Sunscreen"
Given during awards, commemorations, and special ceremonies
Speaker communicates the importance of award/memorial/commemoration or recipient
Speech of Presentation
Speeches at awards nights
Commemorative or memorial events
Statue or Memorial Dedications
Military Awards (Purple Heart, etc.)
Celebrate and commemorate the life of someone while also consoling those left behind
Being able to give one of these is probably one of the most profound speeches you can give for your loved ones in everyday life...
Eulogy
Funeral services
Memorial Services
Events memorializing catastrophes
Speech given during or after dinner
Can do the work of or lead to a toast, but this is often where the evening's purpose is focused, after an unstructured shared meal and random conversation
After Dinner Speech
Business meetings - getting on track
Weddings - Congratulations
Reunions - family talk
Celebrations - let's get it started
0 - Inspiration
1 - Introduction
2 - Presentation
3 - Acceptance
4 - After Dinner Speech
5 - Roast
6 - Toast
7 - Inspiration
8 - Eulogy
9 - Acceptance
ACTIVITY
Any speech that has the main function of entertaining, celebrating, commemorating, inspiring, or setting a social agenda.
FOR THIS CLASS,
OUTLINES FOR SPECIAL OCCASION SPEECHES DO NOT NEED TO BE AS FORMAL.

I AM ONLY LOOKING FOR A GENERAL INTRODUCTION AND CONCLUSION, WITH YOUR SPEECH IN-BETWEEN.

ON THE FOLLOWING PAGE IS AN EXAMPLE OUTLINE FOR A SPECIAL OCCASION SPEECH.
Poetic Devices to use in Speeches:
Alliteration
:

Using words that repeat their first letter over and over
("Octopi Occupy Porcupines' Minds," "Alliteration is alarmingly addictive and actually additive to your addling articulation")

Hook or Callback:

Using a phrase over and over in a speech or establishing an idea in the beginning of a speech that you call back to over and over again.
(e.g. "I have a dream that one day my four little children..," "I have a dream....," "I have a dream today!"
Listing (or "Laundry List")
A long list of similarly formatted items, based on a theme.
I love you,
Because the jump in your step
Because the color of your hair
Because the things you make me feel
Because the way you make me squeal
Because the way we cuddle at night
I just love you, alright?
Chiasmus
A parallel structure that reverses its order in some way:

"Ask not what
your

country

can do for
you
,
Ask what
you
can do
for
your country
."
Simile
:
Comparing things using
"like" or "as" for poetic effect
(Her hair was
LIKE
a summer's breeze.
His speech was pure
AS
silk).

Metaphor
:
Giving one thing the literal attributes of another, for poetic effect.
(Her body
is
a river.
The cardboard box
was
a whole universe.)
Apostrophe:

Whenever a speaker stops addressing his audience and addresses some other group (or, often, an inanimate object)
A FEW MORE LITERARY
DEVICES EXPLAINED:
For Special Occasion Speeches,
I am looking for a basic Introduction & Conclusion:

Introduction
:
Set the scene for us. Establish who the audience is and what kind of speech you are giving.

(E.g. Friends & Family, we are gathered here today to toast to this young couple who are now happily married!)
Conclusion
:
Give us a satisfying Conclusion. Tie up any loose ends and give us a poetic or interesting closing statement.

(E.g. Full of love, full of food, and ready to twerk all night, lets raise our glasses to this young couple. May you have a long life and a WILD PARTY!)
Body
:
This body should cover the main points you want to discuss or talk about. Think about using those poetic and literary devices to make the speech interesting and engaging.

Your body section should be separate from the intro and conclusion, but can just be one block of text or a bullet list, on your outline.

0 - Hook/Callback
1 - Alliteration
2 - Listing/Laundry List
3 - Chiasmus
4 - At least 3 metaphors
5 - At least 3 similes
6 - Apostrophe
7 - Hyperbole (exaggeration)
8 - Onomatopoeia (sounds as words)
9 - Allusion (reference to another famous literary person/place/thing)
Get into groups of 3-4.
Each Group rolls dice, to determine the speech and device used:
Speech of Entertainment
Have a central focus of some kind, but generally are meant to hold the audience's attention in an entertaining way.

Personal Narrative Speech
Storytelling: ghost stories, tall tales, etc.
Stand-Up Comedy
Slam or Spoken Word Poetry
Full transcript