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aérer, unifier, et embellir la villa

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by

Ron Howard

on 6 May 2014

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Transcript of aérer, unifier, et embellir la villa

Modernity in Paris

Haussmannization
"I love the clouds...the clouds that pass...up there...up there...the wonderful clouds!"
-Charles Baudelaire

Haussmannization



Creative Destruction
the destruction of old Paris and the construction of a modern city

‘A great city, a capital above all, has the duty to present itself as equal to the role that it plays in the country. When the country is France, when centralization, which is the basis of its strength, has made the capital both the head and heart of the social body, then that capital would betray its glorious mission if, in spite of everything, it became constantly stuck in the ways of superannuated routine.’
-
Georges-Eugène Haussmann
‘A great city, a capital above all, has the duty to present itself as equal to the role that it plays in the country. When the country is France, when centralization, which is the basis of its strength, has made the capital both the head and heart of the social body, then that capital would betray its glorious mission if, in spite of everything, it became constantly stuck in the ways of superannuated routine.’

“I have been chased away; another has come to settle there and my house has been razed to the ground; a
sordid pavement covers everything. City without a past, full of spirits without memories,
of hearts without tears, of souls without love! City of uprooted multitudes, moveable
heaps of human rubble, you can grow and even become the capital of the world, but you
will never have any citizens.”
Comes The Charming Evening

Prostitution spreads its light and life in the streets:
Like an anthill opening its issue it penetrates
Mysteriously everywhere by its own occult route;
Like an enemy mining the foundations of a fort,
Or a worm in an apple, eating what all should eat,
It circulates securely in the city’s clogged heart.
The Old Clown
"I saw a pitiful old clown, bent, decrepit, the ruin of a man....Everywhere joy, moneymaking, debauchery;
everywhere the assurance of tomorrow’s daily bread; everywhere frenetic outbursts of vitality.. Here absolute misery, and a misery made all the more horrible by being tricked out in comic rags...He sang no song, sad or gay....He was mute and motionless. He had given up, he had abdicated. His fate was sealed.


Loss of A Halo
"I was crossing the boulevard in a great hurry, splashing though the mud in the midst of a seething chaos, and with death galloping at me from every side. I gave a sudden start and my halo slipped off my head and fell into the mire of the macadam."
"Brothel and hospital, prison,
purgatory, helI....infamous city, I adore you! "
(Epilogue, Paris Spleen)
“Paris is an immense workshop of putrefaction, where misery, pestilence and sickness work in concert, where sunlight and air rarely penetrate. Paris is a terrible place where plants shrivel and perish, and where, of seven small infants, four die during the course of the year."
‘Our Paris, the Paris in which we were born, the Paris of the manners of 1830 and 1848, is disappearing. And it is not disappearing materially but morally. Social life is beginning to undergo a great change. I can see women, children, husbands and wives, whole families in the café. The home is dying. Life is threatening to become public… I am a stranger to what is coming and what is here, as for example, to these new boulevards that have nothing of Balzac’s world about them, but make one think of London or some Babylon of the future.’
"In this eyes of the Parisians, who like routine in things but are changeable when it comes to people, I committed two great wrongs; over the course of seventeen years I disturbed their daily habits by turning Paris upside down, and they had to look at the same face of the Prefect in the Hotel de Ville. These were two unforgivable complaints."
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