Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

The Trees Are Down

No description
by

JUAN LOMIENTO

on 30 November 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Trees Are Down

Charlotte Mew was born in Bloomsbury, London on November 15 1869, died on March 24 1928.
Two of her siblings suffer from mental illness, and were committed to institutions.
Three others died later on, leaving her with her mother and sister.
She made a pact with her sister to never marry in order not to pass on the mental illness to their children.
She suffered depression after her sister’s death from cancer in 1927 and therefore committed suicide.
Her work spans was between the period of Victorian poetry and modernism.
Charlotte Mew/Context
THEMES
The theme of the poem is how human activities impact on the environment and how people don't care about what they are doing to trees, animals and indirectly to themselves.
TITLE
The title (The Trees Are Down) reflects the main theme- The excessive cutting of trees.
She wrote this poem in reaction of the plane trees in Euston Square Gardens in 1920's.
TONE AND MOOD

The tone of the poem is depressing.
The poet portrays sadness and lament for the trees which are chopped down everyday and also she laments for the animals who lose their habitats because of deforestation.
Desolation and loss are also shown in the poem.


By: Charlotte Mew
The Trees Are Down
The Poem
FIRST STANZA
In the first stanza, the poem deals with the trees
which are being chopped down. There are words
such as "swish", "crash" that create an auditory image and help the reader to imagine how the branches fall and how the trunks are destroyed. There are also some onomatopoeias like "whoops" and "whoas" which show how men are laughing and enjoying the destruction of nature.
SECOND STANZA
GENERAL MEANING
The tittle "The Trees Are Down" reflects the key theme- the tragedy of arborcide.
It explains the destruction of planes and how the trees are more than simply physical entities.
Charlotte Mew elaborates on that idea by comparing trees to a "God-forsaken rat" and how even they are God's creatures and deserve to live.
It implies that people have the mentality that they are "above" nature.

Metaphorically it refers to her life, after she lost her siblings, her life shattered all over the place as she struggles to get herself back track and live a normal and even life.
The poem foreshowdows Charlotte's own life in that the trees are being cut down and killed, and Charlotte later took her own life
Sources:
https://prezi.com/zem4rn5zqays/the-trees-are-down/

http://www.slideshare.net/Charter-College-English/1charlotte-mew-thetreesaredown
In the second stanza, the poet shows sympathy for
a rat. This rat is dead as it lost its habitat because of the deforestation of trees. This animal is used because it's not a nice animal; however, it should be alive, specially at Spring. The poem makes use of this time of the year as everything should be happiness, colorful and full of life.
FOURTH STANZA
In the last stanza, the poet wrote how she was emotionally involved with the trees and forests which were destroyed :"Half my life it has beat with these, in the sun, in the rains...". At the end of the stanza and of the poem, she makes reference of an angel "He".
The Poem
—and he cried with a loud voice:
Hurt not the earth, neither the sea, nor the trees—
(Revelation)

They are cutting down the great plane-trees at the end of the gardens.
For days there has been the grate of the saw, the swish of the branches as they fall,
The crash of the trunks, the rustle of trodden leaves,
With the ‘Whoops’ and the ‘Whoas,’ the loud common talk, the loud common laughs of the men, above it all.

I remember one evening of a long past Spring
Turning in at a gate, getting out of a cart, and finding a large dead rat in the mud of the drive.
I remember thinking: alive or dead, a rat was a god-forsaken thing,
But at least, in May, that even a rat should be alive.

The week’s work here is as good as done. There is just one bough
On the roped bole, in the fine grey rain,
Green and high
And lonely against the sky.
(Down now!—)
And but for that,
If an old dead rat
Did once, for a moment, unmake the Spring, I might never have thought of him again.

It is not for a moment the Spring is unmade to-day;
These were great trees, it was in them from root to stem:
When the men with the ‘Whoops’ and the ‘Whoas’ have carted the whole of the whispering
loveliness away
Half the Spring, for me, will have gone with them.

It is going now, and my heart has been struck with the hearts of the planes;
Half my life it has beat with these, in the sun, in the rains,
In the March wind, the May breeze,
In the great gales that came over to them across the roofs from the great seas.
There was only a quiet rain when they were dying;
They must have heard the sparrows flying,
And the small creeping creatures in the earth where they were lying—
But I, all day, I heard an angel crying:
‘Hurt not the trees.’
THIRD STANZA
In the third stanza, the poet makes reference again to men and to what they have done (the tree) . She makes use of verbs in the past to show that the trees are already gone and how they contribute to an enjoyable Spring. If there are no trees, there is no Spring. "Half the Spring, for me, will have gone with them."
"He" is referring to an angel
Reference to the Book of Revelation
Onomatopoeia
Alliteration
Repetition
Repetition
Rhyme
Rhyme
Setting
The poem, is not situated in a specific place, but we can say that it happens in a garden, the one that inspired her to write the poem (Euston square gardens). We don't really need to know the place to understand the poem. This poem happened in the 20's, when Charlotte wrote the poem.
POEM
¿Are you agree with deforestation?
Do you think that humans are doing well?
Thank You!
They are cutting down the great plane-trees at the end of
the gardens.
For days there has been the grate of the saw, the swish of
the branches as they fall,
The crash of the trunks, the rustle of trodden leaves,
With the 'Whoops' and the 'Whoa', the loud common talk,
the loud common laughs of the men, above it all.

I remember one evening of a long past Spring
Turning in at a gate, getting out of a cart, and finding
a large dead rat in the mud of the drive.
I remember thinking: alive or dead, a rat was a
god-forsaken thing,
But at least, in May, that even a rat should be alive.

The week's work here is as good as done. There is just
one bough
On the roped bole, in the fine grey rain,
Green and high
And lonely against the sky.
(Down now! -)
And but for that,
If an old dead rat
Did once, for a moment, unmake the Spring, I might never
have thought of him again.

It is not for a moment the Spring is unmade to-day;
These were great trees, it was in them from root to stem:
When the men with the 'Whoops' and the 'Whoas' have carted
the whole of the whispering loveliness away
Half the Spring, for me, will have gone with them.

It is going now, and my heart has been struck with the
hearts of the planes;
Half my life it has beat with these, in the sun, in the rains,
In the March wind, the May breeze,
In the great gales that came over to them across the roofs from the great seas.
There was only a quiet rain when they were dying;
They must have heard the sparrows flying,
And the small creeping creatures in the earth where they were lying -
But I, all day, I heard an angel crying:
'Hurt not the trees.'
Full transcript