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Arts Integration Strategies

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Maria Sunderland

on 9 June 2014

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Transcript of Arts Integration Strategies

Arts Integration Strategies
Classroom Management
1) Set clear rules and guidelines, making sure the students understand them fully.

2) Have consequences in place; be ready and able to deal with disruptions swiftly and with as little “down time” as possible.

3) Choose activities that you can have some control over the area, make sure you can see what is going on clearly.

Display & Performance Opportunities
Techniques:
1) Artwork can be placed on the walls as is, in frames, or in a display case.
2) Artwork can be hung from the ceiling

Places for Displays:
1) Pictures or videos of the student’s works of art can be taken and incorporated into a power point for the school student body to view at a special event or “Art night”.
2) Works of art can be displayed in the school’s main office or in the hallways.
3) Works of art can be displayed at local art galleries or community art shows.




Integration Examples
1) Visual Arts with History- Have the students research a famous artist, write a paper about their life and artistic style and then create a painting using those techniques.

2) Visual Arts with Math- When creating sculptures the students will need to learn how to correcty figureout the formula for proportions so that their recreations will fit within the guidlines set
Arts Integration
Drama
Online & Community Resources
This website has a number of online resources to integrate the arts into the classroom all in one place.
http://www.learner.org/libraries/connectarts68/library_resource.html
This website has activities and lessons that include visual arts.
http://www.neiu.edu/~middle/Modules/science%20mods/amazon%20components/AmazonComponents3.html
This is another site that has a big list of resources that include lessons and activities.
http://www.edutopia.org/arts-integration-resources


Visual
Arts

Dance, Music, and Movement
Classroom Management
1) Have clear behavioral guidelines set in place for practices and performances.

2) Have clear consequences in place, and be prepared to swiftly carry them out with minimal classroom disruption.

3) To minimize arguments over which pieces the class will do, provide a short list of poems and/or plays to choose from and have a vote.

4) Have safety checks on all props and costumes to make sure they will not pose a risk or unnecessary distraction.



Team A
EED/435
June 9, 2014
Paul Coleman
Display & Performance Opportunities
Techniques:
1) In the form of a play (speaking parts)
2) In the form of individual parts such as historical figures
3) In the form of a musical skit (preformed to music)
4) Pantomime (no speaking only acting)

Performance Opportunities:
1) School classroom performed for other individual classes
2) School auditorium performed for large groups/parents/student body
3) Local community play house performed for the community
4) Local collage theater house
5) Outside venue such as a park or amphitheater

Integration Examples
1) Drama with Language Arts- Have the students research their favorite plays and then write a new one following traditional methods.

2) Drama with History- Have the students act out a famous event, such as the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
Online & Community Resources
Childsplay Theatre- This theatre features familiar plays for children such as Beauty and the Beast and Alice in Wonderland. This would be a great place to bring children to see a play.
This website has resources for creating plays with children. The site has several different scripts and ideas for children to create their own play in the classroom.
http://dramaresource.com/resources/features/420-plays-for-children
This site has a lot of ideas for teaching drama in the classroom.
http://www.proteacher.com/080010.shtml


Classroom Management
1) Have clear behavioral guidelines set in place for practices and performances.

2) Have clear consequences in place, and be prepared to swiftly carry them out with minimal classroom disruption.

3) To minimize arguments over which music the class will do their dance to, provide a short list of music for the students to choose from.

4) Have safety checks on all costumes for the dance. Make sure no loose material will hamper movement.


Display & Performance Opportunities
Assessment Ideas
Integration Examples
1) Dance with History- Students can research one of the dances of the Native Americans and find someone from the local tribe to teach it to them.

2) Movement with Language Arts- Have the students jump, spin and clap to the parts of a sentence.
Online & Community Resources
This website has a many ideas for music and movement lessons.
http://www.earlylearningactivities.com/PDF/musicmovement.pdf
This website explains the importance of movement education and also has curriculum for various ages.
http://www.highscope.org/Content.asp?ContentId=333
This website has lesson plans for dance.
http://artswork.asu.edu/teachers/lesson_plans/dance/

• Play music for students to write about (Ex: play a sad/happy/themed song and let the students write what emotions they feel about the music they hear).
• Create a dance or movement to help students identify the structure of poetry (Ex: use claps and stomps for stressed or unstressed syllables
while reading aloud).
• Dance to represent the parts of a story (Ex: calm movements for the beginning, faster movements for the rising action, dramatic movements for the climax,
slower for the falling action, and calm again for the resolution).
• Learn songs for any skill (Ex: sing a song about punctuation to help students remember it).

• Use movement to learn new skills (Ex: ‘add’ or ‘subtract’ students from a group, use student bodies to create geometric shapes, etc.).
• Let students create songs to remember skills (Ex: create a “math rap” about a specific skill to sing in front of the class).
• Learn songs for any skill (Ex: sing a song about subtraction to help students remember it).
• Use math to create or analyze dances (Ex: count steps, find patterns within the dance, use math in choreography, etc.).

• Use movement to learn new subjects (Ex: use student bodies to create a moving representation of the solar system, move like plants toward the sun, etc.).
• Learn songs for any skill (Ex: sing a song about weather to help students remember it).
• Let students create songs to remember subjects (Ex: write and perform a song about a type of natural disaster).
• Play charades (Ex: have one student act out a type of animal or the conditions in a specific climate or environment for other students to guess).
• Dance to represent elements of physics (Ex: show the effects of force, motion, and gravity through dance movements).
Language Arts
Math
Science

• Watch, learn about, and/or perform dances that ancient peoples used (Ex: Egyptians miming stories of their gods through dance rituals).
• Discuss why men, women, and children may have had different roles in ancient dances.
• Play samples of ancient music and discuss their meanings for that culture (include lyric translations).
• Learn about musicians, composers, and dancers from different cultures.
• Assign movements to certain subjects to aid in memorization (Ex: create a ‘class set’ of movements to represent each amendment in the Bill of Rights).
Social Studies
Assessment Ideas

• Use drawings to express what cannot be written.
• Observe illustrations in books to identify characters, settings, context clues, etc.
• Draw personal interpretations of book situations: key ideas, conflict, resolution, alternate endings, etc.
• Write about observed and created artwork (Ex: draw an image and write a story about it, or write a story and then illustrate it).


• Telling time with craft clocks (moveable hands attached with fastener brads).
• Create art with geometric shapes (Ex: make quilt squares).
• Observe mathematic elements in art (Ex: symmetry in a sculpture or painting).
• Use math ratios to make something (Ex: make paint in class).



• Create models of subjects (Ex: layers of the Earth, flowers, insects, etc.).
• Observe images of things too large/impossible to bring to class (Ex: planets).
• Observe force and motion (Ex: spin a marble in a bottle with paint in it).

Language Arts
Math
Science

• Observe/draw images of important historical figures.
• View photos/art of major historical events (Ex: slavery, women’s suffrage, etc.)
• View images and real examples of ancient art (Ex: paintings, sculpture, etc.).
• View images of ancient architecture (Ex: temples, churches, etc.).
• Create maps (Ex: color code each geographical region of one state).

Social Studies
Assessment Ideas

• Read plays aloud (assign characters for students to read/play).
• Write original Fairy Tales, Myths, Folk Tales, etc. (to be performed).
• Write scripts (Ex: pick a subject and write a script for a skit to perform).
• Practice with speaking, expressing emotions, pantomime, and so on (Ex: act out the emotions of characters in a story).


• Write skits where the students can apply new math skills (Ex: make up a real-life situation where addition and subtraction are used).
• Use math elements (Ex: geometry) to design sets, costumes, props, etc.
• Work with money and planning a performance (Ex: how much tickets should cost, how many tickets to sell to cover show costs, etc.).


• Act out science (Ex: act out stages of the water cycle with body movements).
• Write and perform skits to present science topics (Ex: play newscasters covering a hurricane during a weather unit).

Language Arts
Math
Science
• Act out historical events (Ex: ancient trade with goods and services).
• Act out other elements of social studies (Ex: show how the three branches of government work together -- and what
would happen if they did not).

Social Studies
Hello new teachers!
Welcome to our
First Annual Arts Integration Night
.

We are thrilled that you have joined us tonight, because your attendance tells us that our students are going to be under the guidance of educators who are truly passionate about providing a high-quality, exciting, and diverse education.

We firmly believe that integration of the fine arts in our general education classrooms will provide benefits that would not otherwise be seen. Please join us in learning and sharing more about the wide variety of options and ideas available for bringing the arts into our students' lives!
Techniques:
1) In the form of a musical performance including singing and playing instruments
2) In the form of dance and movement performance
3) In the form of a musical skit (preformed to music)

Performance Opportunities:
1) School classroom performed for other individual classes
2) School auditorium performed for large groups/parents/student body
3) Performance at a retirement community or daycare center
4) Local Downtown "Music Walk" performances at participating businesses
5) Outside venue such as a park or amphitheater
Adaptations
Exceptional Learners:
Let students work at their own pace on projects.
Grade students on completion and/or effort.
Let students work with a partner if they are unable to perform the task alone - their input should be seen in the final product.

Advanced Learners:
Use open-ended questions (Ex: let students explain their artwork in a way that reflects their ability to think deeply and carefully about decisions).
Let students work at their own pace on projects.
Let students expand on a basic idea in their own way (Ex: create a story to go along with a simple
drawing activity).
Adaptations
Exceptional Learners:
Limit the amount of lines the students must learn/memorize for a performance.
Let students film their dance outside of the class if a performance is required to put less pressure on them. Play the video in class instead.
Let students work in groups if help is needed with writing scripts.

Advanced Learners:
Let students work at their own pace on projects.
Let students go above and beyond with their scripts (Ex: include additional characters that were not required to make the skit more interesting).
Ask students more open-ended questions for
their script-writing research.
Adaptations
Exceptional Learners:
Limit the number of lyrics and/or steps the students are required to learn.
Let students film their performances instead of performing them in class.
Let students move with the class and grade them on participation and effort.
Provide students with templates for the songs they create.

Advanced Learners:
Let students work at their own pace on projects.
Let students write songs from scratch if they want to.
Let students express their abilities for deep thought during activities that require reflection and creativity by asking open-ended questions and providing time for them to get their detailed thoughts written down.
Full transcript