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The ABCs of Expository Writing: Attack the Prompt, Brainstorm, and Choose Your Structure

ABCs and FRIES
by

Kayla and Stephen Briseño

on 28 January 2013

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Transcript of The ABCs of Expository Writing: Attack the Prompt, Brainstorm, and Choose Your Structure

What about drooling? Does staring at the prompt help? A How do you start a writing task? B C
the writing task prompt Draw an arrow from each circled TO-DO word to what it specifically tells you to do. ttack the prompt TO-DO words
are ACTION words. add something to your essay Common TO-DO / Action words What is the prompt asking you to do? 2. Circle TO-DO Words Show Add the To-DO word SHOW in front of questions Circle the TO-DO or Action words Cross out the words that say WRITE AN ESSAY in the prompt. Under the prompt, make a DO-WHAT chart. This helps us avoid partially answering the prompt 1. Cross out the words that say WRITE AN ESSAY in the prompt. We don't need these words because we already know already know we are going to write an essay. This reduces the chances of us being distracted by extra words. 3. Draw an arrow from each circled TO-DO word to what it specifically tells you to do. show Add the To-DO word SHOW in front of questions show Add the To-DO word SHOW in front of questions Copy down each TO-DO word, and next to it, write down WHAT the word specifically asks you to do. 4. Under the prompt, make a DO-WHAT chart. The DO-WHAT chart will then serve as your prompt-- you don't need to look at the entire prompt anymore! think show explain use DO WHAT about someone you've studied in school what makes them special to study why they're special details and examples to support your ideas The DO-WHAT chart from Attacking the Prompt The Attacked Prompt brainstorm possible answers choose the order of your response 1 2 3 4 When it comes to essays... Attack First,
Ask Questions Later Introducing: think show explain use DO WHAT about someone you've studied in school what makes them special to study why they're special details and examples to support your ideas show Add the To-DO word SHOW in front of questions 1. Describe use words to clearly tell about each part of an idea 11. Develop add one piece of new information at a time until an entire idea is formed 4. Convince win someone over through arguments or evidence 5. Persuade 7. Share win someone over through arguments or evidence
let someone know your idea so both of you can know it 8. Show 13. Provide 12. Include
tell people clearly so they can see or imagine your ide
clearly tell each part of an idea so that it can be understood give 3. Identify 9. Discuss 2. Explain
talk or write about a topic select one clear idea from other different ideas in your mind 10. Think meet a person or thing 6. Encounter clearly tell the name of something or someone pink wrinkled SQUISHY Great Feats of Engineering don't start with the top. They are built from the ground up, using STRATEGY, just like a good essay. 1. Make a list.

2. Make a web. Attacked the prompt. List Web Topic in
the Center Big Idea that Answers the Prompt
Support
goes underneath Another Big Idea Big Idea Big Idea 1. Choose the right text structure
that helps answer the prompt.

2. Write a kernel essay. 9 Expository Text Structures Adding Support with FRIES Need to add more details?

Add some FRIES to your paragraphs.

The more FRIES you have, the more support your writing will have. F R I E S = Facts Add interesting facts to your essay.

Example: Research shows
________.

Example: A recent study
in Time Magazine found
that ________. = Reasons Give reasons to support the main idea.

For example, if the prompt asks why pollution is a problem, you should have at least three reasons to support your idea.

Reason 1: Pollution kills animals.

Reason 2: Pollution in the air makes us sick.

Reason 3: Pollution is killing the earth. = Incidents and = Examples

An example of this problem is the melting of the polar ice caps, which is causing polar bears to lose their homes and learn new ways of survival. Many of them are having a very difficult time with this and are dying as a result. = Statistics and Sensory Details Statistics help make a point clear. Statistics can
be powerful!

Examples of statistics:
8 out of 10 students agree...
95% of all dentists believe...
1/4 of all drivers get nervous when... Tell a quick story or give examples to support your reasons. For example, if the reason pollution is problem because it is "killing animals", then you need to give an example that supports that reason. Sensory details talk to your five
senses (taste, touch, smell, sight,
hearing).


Drip, drip, drip goes the water faucet.
The rich, creamy ice cream melted quickly in my mouth.

Use specific verbs (action words) and adjectives (describing words).

Example: Use "reported" instead of "said".
Example: Use "humungous" instead of big. Group Practice Here's the prompt: Many communities have pollution problems, for example with their air or with their water. Can you think of solutions to the problem of pollution in your community? Write an essay describing how pollution affects your community and what can be done about it. F R I E S Do-What Chart
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