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art criticism

4 steps to a successful art critique
by

Brandy Stanley

on 21 February 2013

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Transcript of art criticism

Art Criticism:
The 4 steps to a successful art critique Art Criticism Analysis Interpretation Aesthetics Judgment Step four in critiquing a work of art. When you determine the degree of artistic merit. Also, whether or not a piece of art is successful or not. Description Step one in the critique process. Carefully make a list of all the things you see in the work. Should include size of the work and the medium used by the artist. When examining any work of art, critics ask and answer questions such as these:
What is seen in the artwork?
How is the artwork is designed
What does it mean?
Is it a a successful work of art? Step two of the critiquing process. You discover how the work is organized Step three of the critiquing process. You will explain or tell the meaning or mood of the work. The philosophy or study of the nature of beauty and art.
There are many aesthetic theories that are used to understand, judge, and defend judgments about works of art
Three theories:
Imitationalism
Formalism
Emotionalism Your personal interaction with a work of art. Aesthetic Experience An organized system for studying a work of art. It has four stages: description, analysis, interpretation, judgment. Art Criticism  The realistic qualities that appear in the subject of the work Literal Qualities Henri Rousseau, The Sleeping Gypsy, 1897, Oil on Canvas, (51”x 79”), The Museum of Modern Art, New York. How well the work is organized. This aesthetic quality is favored by Formalism. Design Qualities Henri Rousseau, The Sleeping Gypsy, 1897, Oil on Canvas, (51”x 79”), The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Those qualities that communicate ideas and moods. Expressive Qualities Henri Rousseau, The Sleeping Gypsy, 1897, Oil on Canvas, (51”x 79”), The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Henri Rousseau, The Sleeping Gypsy, 1897, Oil on Canvas, (51”x 79”), The Museum of Modern Art, New York. An aesthetic theory that focuses on realistic representation. Imitationalism Elisabeth Louise Vigee-Lebrun, Self-Portrait ,1781, Oil on canvas, Kimball Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas The aesthetic theory that places emphasis on the design qualities. The arrangement of the elements of art using the principles of design. Formalism Henri Matisse, The Rumanian Blouse, 1937, Oil on Canvas,(29” x 24”), Cincinnati Art Museum An aesthetic theory that requires a strong communication of feelings, moods, or ideas from the work to the viewer. Emotionalism George de la Tour, Magdalen with Smoking Flame, 1638, Oil on canvas, (46” x 36”), Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
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