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The Lunar Chronicles

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Kelly Horne

on 14 August 2014

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Transcript of The Lunar Chronicles

Marissa Meyer
Lexile: 790L
Square Fish
387 pages
Humans and androids crowd the the raucous streets of New Beijing. A deadly plague ravages the population. From space, a ruthless lunar people watch, waiting to make their move. No one knows that Earth's fate hinges on one girl...
Sixteen-year-old Cinder, a gifted mechanic, is a cyborg. She's a second-class citizen with a mysterious past and is reviled by her stepmother. But when her life becomes intertwined with the handsome Prince Kai's, she suddenly finds herself at the center of an intergalatic struggle, and forbidden attraction. Caught between duty and freedom, loyalty and betrayal, she must uncover secrets about her past in order to protect her world's future. Because there is something unusual about Cinder, something that others would kill for.
The Lunar Chronicles
Book Information
Cinder and Iko, her android assistant and friend in her lonely home.
FAvorite CHaracters
"Vanity is a factor, but it is more a question of control. It is easier to trick others into perceiving you as beautiful if you can convince yourself you
"I'm sure I'll feel much more grateful when I find a guy who thinks complex wiring is a turn-on."
"Maybe her programming was overwhelmed by Prince Kai's uncanny hotness.”
"She briefly wished she did have some sort of magic so she could shoot a bolt of lightning through his head."
“But if there was one thing she knew from years as a mechanic, it was that some stains never came out.”
"I love you, Cinder. I'm glad you're not sick."
"Of course I know what love is." And sadness too. She wished she could cry to prove it.
FAvorite Quotes
"The precarious fantasy crashed around her as quickly as it had begun."
"Why would the prince dance with me?"
Iko's fan hummed as she sought an answer.
"Because you won't have grease on your face this time."
Now, Where Have I Seen Her Before?
In Thomas Foster's chapter, "Now Where Have I Seen Her Before?," he states "...there's no such thing as a wholly original work of literature."
is a retelling of a Grimm fairy tale made popular by the Walt Disney company. There are several allusions to the original story, including describing a rusty old car as "a rotting pumpkin."
Marked for Greatness
So Cinder didn't have a scar on her forehead like Harry Potter or Charles. But she does have a bionic foot and hand, and she is over 30% not human. Being a cyborg sets her apart, making her different and looked at as an outcast. However, without her role as a second-class citizen, the story would have no gumption or momentum.
Meyer's Style
Marissa Meyer is very sarcastic through her characters, especially Cinder. The sarcastic remarks made the story easy, and the character's who didn't understand sarcasm made me laugh. On the opposite end of the spectrum, parts of the storyline were written with tenderness and a gentle hand. Meyer could pull me from laughing to crying within a page or two.
One thing I really loved about Cinder was that the theme was not to find true love and live happily ever after. The story is focused on the struggles of a society, the strength in differences, and the belief in yourself.
to read or not to read?
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