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pantomime

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by

b harrison

on 30 May 2016

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Transcript of pantomime

Cinderella
Inspiration
Here are some videos to
help you understand what
Pantomime can look like
on stage.
warm up music
drama work music
Lesson 1
what is Pantomime?
Lesson objectives
Lesson Tasks
what am I
expected
to do?
be able to identify elements of a pantomime performance.
become adaptable to new visual stimulus and mimic the movement successfully.
develop co-ordination skills and confidence to perform.
listen to the introduction of new topic from teacher.
take part in warm up excercise to develop mime movement.
watch video examples of mime movement.
learn small routine as taught by teacher, students then add parts together.
practice routine
The form has a number of conventions, some of which have changed or weakened a little over the years, and by no means all of which are obligatory. Some of these conventions were once common to other genres of popular theatre such as melodrama.
The leading male juvenile character (the principal boy) - is traditionally played by a young woman, usually in tight-fitting male garments (such as breeches) that make her female charms evident.
An older woman (the pantomime dame - often the hero's mother) is usually played by a man in drag.
Risqué double entendre, often wringing innuendo out of perfectly innocent phrases. This is, in theory, over the heads of the children in the audience.
Audience participation, including calls of "He's behind you!" (or "Look behind you!"), and "Oh, yes it is!" and "Oh, no it isn't!" The audience is always encouraged to boo the villain and "awwwww" the poor victims, such as the rejected dame, who usually fancies the prince.
Music may be original but is more likely to combine well-known tunes with re-written lyrics. At least one "audience participation" song is traditional: one half of the audience may be challenged to sing 'their' chorus louder than the other half.
The animal, played by an actor in 'animal skin' or animal costume. It is often a pantomime horse or cow, played by two actors in a single costume, one as the head and front legs, the other as the body and back legs.
The good fairy enters from stage right (from the audience's point of view this is on the left) and the villain enters from stage left (right from the point of view of the audience). This convention goes back to the medieval mystery plays, where the right side of the stage symbolised Heaven and the left side symbolised Hell.
Sometimes the story villain will squirt members of the audience with water guns or pretend to throw a bucket of 'water' at the audience that is actually full of streamers.
A slapstick comedy routine may be performed, often a decorating or baking scene, with humour based on throwing messy substances. Until the 20th century, British pantomimes often concluded with a harlequinade, a free-standing entertainment of slapstick. Nowadays the slapstick is more or less incorporated into the main body of the show.
In the 19th century, until the 1880s, pantomimes typically included a transformation scene in which a Fairy Queen magically transformed the pantomime characters into the characters of the harlequinade, who then performed the harlequinade.
The Chorus, who can be considered extras on-stage, and often appear in multiple scenes (but as different characters) and who perform a variety of songs and dances throughout the show. Due to their multiple roles they may have as much stage-time as the lead characters themselves.

Pantomime is basically acting without words and communicating with your body. Mimes (those performing pantomime) do not speak with their mouths, but express life through movement and through using their bodies to suggest their environment. Acting like you are trapped in an invisible box is an example of pantomime, or mime.
There are two main types of pantomime: narrative and plot/story-based. Narrative pantomime utilizes a storyteller or narrator as one acts out the action of the narrative. Plot/story-based pantomime is a story that unfolds or progresses on its own, with the audience seeing the story rather than hearing it.




Students benefit from pantomime in many ways. Learning to be silent is one of them! Pantomime utilizes precise economic movement. From practicing, students gain communication skills, self control, build listening skills, practice focus, learn economy of movement, and create and understand plot lines and situations. This is a great tool for visual learners!
Why should students study Pantomime?
How to spot
a Pantomime?

Lesson 2+3
Lesson objectives
Lesson Tasks
Robotic
machine
to recognise a selection of elements within a pantomime performance.
be a effective member of the group and develop self discipline in rehearsals.
creatively develop humour into the group's routine.
adopt a professional performing attitude.
revise knowledge from previous lesson.
warm up session on robotic movement.
brainstorm ideas of a robots within building a machine.
gather into working groups and rehearse small routine, assessing effective ideas during the experimentation of movement.
perform routine.
robotic music
funky music
fight music
Lesson 4+5
Lesson objectives
Lesson Tasks
Fight
to win!
to be aware of communicating with the audience.
be a effective member of the group and develop self discipline in rehearsals.
creatively develop humour into the group's storyline.
adopt a professional performing attitude.
revise knowledge from previous lesson.
watch examples of conflict in mime routines.
teacher selects random groups.
brainstorm ideas within a competitive scenario.
gather into working groups and rehearse small routine, assessing effective ideas during the experimentation of movement.
perform routine.
Lesson 6+7
Lesson objectives
Lesson Tasks
Tell your
own
story.
to be aware of communicating with the audience.
be a effective member of the group and develop self discipline in rehearsals.
creatively develop humour into the group's storyline.
adopt a professional performing attitude.
revise knowledge from previous lesson.
get into groups assigned by teacher.
brainstorm ideas within your group.
check your idea with the teacher before ANY rehearsals.
evaluate successful ideas in your planning to prove your development.
continue rehearsals.
perform routine.
churn the butter
snake slide
rolling wave
sprinkler
stack the shelves
shopping cart
paint face
wash the car
mow the lawn
big bus wheel
nose dive
cats eyes
disco arm roll
disco fever
chicken wing
running man
robot
Lead male character is played by a female.
Older female character is usually played by a man.
Audience participation.
Materials thrown into the audience for shock factor.
Music and sing-a-long lyrics.
Animal characters played by 2 actors.
Good characters enter from stage-right, bad characters enter from stage-left.
Slapstick comedy routines that create chaos.
Chorus characters have multiple roles on stage.
AssessmentCriteria
clear story line.
build tension
effective mime
movement to the beat
happy ending
Lesson 6+7
Lesson objectives
Lesson Tasks
Tell your
own
story.
to be aware of communicating with the audience.
be a effective member of the group and develop self discipline in rehearsals.
creatively develop humour into the group's storyline.
adopt a professional performing attitude.
revise knowledge from previous lesson.
get into groups assigned by teacher.
brainstorm ideas within your group.
check your idea with the teacher before ANY rehearsals.
evaluate successful ideas in your planning to prove your development.
continue rehearsals.
perform routine.
Lesson 8
Lesson objectives
Lesson Tasks
Be the
Mime.
To be able to duplicate the technique and design of a mime performer's makeup.
Understand the techniques used to apply makeup safely and effectively.
Be aware of working with a model and treating them with care.
Listen to the outline of today's lesson along with the health and safety rules.
Watch tutorial by the teacher on how to apply makeup.
Get into groups of 3/4 around a makeup station.
Complete a full face of makeup with a twist of personality.
Have your work photographed before cleaning down materials and the model.
Full transcript