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The Fault in Our Stars

The Fault in Our Stars
by

Jenna Anderson

on 27 February 2014

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Transcript of The Fault in Our Stars

Characters

Hazel Grace Lancaster
Augustus Waters
Isacc
Peter Van Houten
Mr. & Mrs. Lancaster
Mr. & Mrs. Waters
Lidewij Vliegenthart
Patrick
Kaitlyn
Summary
Paragraph From Book
Late in the winter of my seventeenth year, my mother decided I was depressed, presumably because I rarely left the house, spent quite a lot of time in bed, read the same book over and over,, ate infrequently, and devoted quite a bit of my abundant free time thinking about death. Whenever you read a cancer booklet or website or whatever, they always list depression among the side effects of cancer. But in fact, depression is not a side effect of cancer. Depression is a side effect of dying. (Cancer is also a side effect of dying. Almost everything is really.) But my mom believed I required treatment, so she took me to see my regular Doctor Jim, who agreed that I was veritably swimming in a paralyzing and totally clinical depression, and that therefore my meds should be adjusted and also I should attend a weekly Support Group.
The End
Favorite Part
“There will come a time when all of us are dead. All of us. There will come a time when there are no human beings remaining to remember that anyone ever existed or that our species ever did anything. There will be no one left to remember Aristotle or Cleopatra, let alone you. Everything that we did and built and wrote and thought and discovered will be forgotten and all of this will have been for naught. Maybe that time is coming soon and maybe it is millions of years away, but even if we survive the collapse of our sun, we will not survive forever. There was time before organisms experienced consciousness, and there will be time after. And if the inevitability of human oblivion worries you, I encourage you to ignore it. God knows that’s what everyone else does.”
The Fault in Our Stars
By John Green
Yes, it is a novel about cancer, but this isn't just your average story about a girl with some terminal disease. This novel is a story about life, death, immortality, oblivion, and coping with it all. Diagnosed with lung cancer at 13, Hazel was prepared to die until, at 14, a medical miracle shrunk the tumours in her lungs... for now. Two years post-miracle, sixteen-year-old Hazel is post-everything else, too; post-high school, post-friends and post-normalcy. And even though she could live for a long time, Hazel lives tethered to an oxygen tank, the tumours tenuously kept at bay with a constant chemical assault. Then there's Augustus Waters. A match made at cancer kid support group, Augustus is gorgeous, in remission, and shockingly to her, interested in Hazel. Being with Augustus is both an unexpected destination and a long-needed journey, pushing Hazel to re-examine how sickness and health, life and death, will define her and the legacy that everyone leaves behind.

Pictures
Second Favorite Part
Full transcript