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Priests of Ancient Rome

Project for Latin 2011
by

Tommy Mahon

on 7 September 2012

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Transcript of Priests of Ancient Rome

Priests of Ancient Rome Sybils Tommy Mahon the the (aka, Oracles) Haruspices the Pontifex the Templa Pantheon the Thank you for watching Chew leaves, trance.
Only women, Greek=prophetess
Interpret dreams, omens, events predict future/fate
Gods spoke through her
Sibyl of Cumaean & Aeneas
Sibyl of Cumaean & Apollo http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4e/SibylCumae.jpg Sybil of Cumae http://freebeerforyorky.com/spices_files/bayleaves.jpg Bay leaves (above) http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/19/DelphicSibylByMichelangelo.jpg Oracle of Delphi (below) Flights of birds
Roman official
Consent and dissent of gods
Ira deorum/pax deorum
A little cheesey
Noises, groups, direction
Influential The curved crop, common symbol of Roman augurs Priest, interprets gods and their wills
"Read" the guts/entrails of animals like lambs and goats.
Death, burning, liver
Liver Size, shape color texture
Spurinna predicts Caesar's death
Divine happiness (below) sheep liver interpreter An engraving of an augur (below) Mosaic from Seville (left) Augurs Augur on a Roman coin (left) Head of Roman religion
"Pope" of Romans
"bridge maker" pons+fex
Pax/ira deorum
Controlled religious law.
Regulated sacrifices, temples, marriage, burial and cemetery, adoption, public religious values.
Power and influence, see coin above (Sacerdotes Romae) Built by one of Augustus's generals
"all gods" in Greek.
Greek architecture
Burned to ground twice.
Biggest dome in the world until 1400!
Brick and concrete, 20 feet
Hole in the ceiling=oculus Take a look inside! (left) www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMoNpOkopDk&feature=player_embedded http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/de/Le_Panth%C3%A9on_de_nuit.jpg Exterior (below) An alter (below left) http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/35/Pantheon_%28Rome%29_altar.jpg http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ee/Augur,_Nordisk_familjebok.png http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-GyWc00fT78Q/TZM3x62GC8I/AAAAAAAAAZ0/nLWWMDvIAUw/s1600/RomanMosaic_Italica_Sevilla_imm0011_N11.jpeg http://www.forumancientcoins.com/moonmoth/coins/pics/sep_sev/sep_sev_019.jpg http://www.ewetel.net/~martin.bode/schau.gif http://www.the-romans.co.uk/g4/05.haruspex.jpg http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/27/Piacenza_Bronzeleber.jpg (above) Haruspex, assistants and victim. (below) Inspecting entrails Denarius with Pontifex http://bookofcels.com/assignments/rome/caesar_denarius.jpgs Agustus, pontifex, ready for sacrifce Greek and Roman Temples (right) Worship and sacrifice
Sacrifices (Food, wine, pig, ox, sheep, lamb....libations, even humans,)
Generals thank gods for war victories.
Culturally important
Incredible attention to detail (distance=diameter of the colums)
Meal vs. smoke http://www.shafe.co.uk/crystal/images/lshafe/Rome_Temple_of_Vespasian_entablature.jpg Temple of Jupiter http://www.decorarconarte.com/WebRoot/StoreES2/Shops/61552482/4958/8B9E/30B1/2699/AD34/C0A8/28B8/6BFF/Greek_0020_and_0020_roman_0020_temples.jpg Detail of a temple arch (above) http://thewanderingscot.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/IMG_9878.jpg http://www.free-photos.biz/images/consumer_products/clothes/augustus_as_pontifex_maximus.jpg Bronze Sacrificial Knife (above) http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1439/5143846363_8a9ecd0d29.jpg (The temples) One specific temple... Similar to the Augur... Who's in charge?... I think we're done so... Bibliography Works Cited:
"Pontifex Maximus." Wikipedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Nov. 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontifex_Maximus,>.
Pope, Stephanie. Cambridge Latin course. North American 4th ed. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Print.
Carr, Karen. "pantheon," Kidipede - History for Kids. 2011. http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/romans/architecture/pantheon.htm
Carr, Karen. "temples," Kidipede - History for Kids. 2011. http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/romans/architecture/temples.htm
"Sibyl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Nov. 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sibyl>.
Virgilius, Publius. Aeneid. Rome: None, 29. Print.
"Cumaean Sibyl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Nov. 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumaean_Sibyl>.
"The Cumaean Sibyl Ancient Rome's Great Priestess and Prophet." Dreamscape. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Nov. 2011. <www.dreamscape.com/morgana/desdemo2.htm>.
Tibullus. "Selections from Tibullus and others - Tibullus - Google Books." Google Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Nov. 2011. <http://books.google.com/books?id=4JUuAolqU5MC&pg=PA132&lpg=PA132&dq=sibyl+chewed+leaves&source=bl&ots=rvNU0BV4AK&sig=PEt2mTntcpgk3vEk4kpJCB13EiI&hl=en&ei=PlKiTtiJIsmtiQLTgOVd&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CCIQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=sibyl%20chewed%20leaves&f=false>.
"Roman Temples." Castles. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Nov. 2011. <http://www.castles.me.uk/roman-temples.htm>.
Mills, Dorothy. The Book of the Ancient Romans. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1937. Print. = Same And now a word from our Sponsor...
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